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  • Direction: Preaching and Teaching from the Old Testament: A Guide for the Church
    seeks to avoid what he terms a flat book hermeneutic e g interpretation in which the New Testament sits in judgment on the Old 50 51 He does so by identifying the Hebrew Bible as the powerful Word of God which points to Jesus as Messiah while it deals with life s questions The value of the OT rests on its theological center the promise fulfillment scheme Kaiser proposed in his Toward an Old Testament Theology Zondervan 1978 as well as the primacy of grace He calls for expository preaching as the solution to the silencing of the OT in the Christian pulpit Kaiser asks that the OT be allowed to stand on its own criticizing Elizabeth Achtemeier s instruction that an OT text be paired with a corresponding NT reading Just over half the book is given to part two a review of the primary OT genres of narrative wisdom prophets laments torah praise and apocalyptic The chapter on narrative is helpful giving attention to scenes characterization plot and such rhetorical devices as repetition omissions gaps chiasm and irony The sheer variety of genres within them makes for a rather cursory treatment of wisdom and prophetic literature The brief chapter on praise reviews hymn and thanksgiving song genres but fails to treat a primary problem for preachers developing sermonic tension the problem the sermon needs to overcome More 119 troubling is Kaiser s treatment of Daniel s seventy weeks in the chapter on apocalyptic texts The result is a sermon in which the preacher attempts to lay out the historical fulfillment of what he sees as a prophecy of Israelite history The genre review is a helpful primer for the beginning expositor though the sample sermons which follow each chapter seem a bit lifeless perhaps since all but one

    Original URL path: http://www.directionjournal.org/33/1/preaching-and-teaching-from-old.html (2016-02-16)
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  • Direction: Building the Christian Academy
    unity of truth doxological learning and care of the soul moral spiritual formation Holmes builds his case by starting with the Alexandrians and moving through history to John Henry Newman He carefully selects other representatives of seven historic periods in discussing the philosophy of Christian education Plato Isocrates Clement and Origen Abelard Hugh of St Victor Aquinas Bonaventure Erasmus Bacon and Milton For example in his call for holistic Christian liberal arts education Holmes cites Augustine s work On the Teacher The real teacher is the one who teaches within the soul namely the divine Logos The Augustinian call to be ruled not by what we know but by what we love clearly integrates intellectual and spiritual pursuits an assimilation that needs to be revisited in our era of specialization and fragmentation Holmes moves through his seven periods with a speed and passion that sometimes makes the reader wish he would slow down He also has a tendency to make sweeping statements that minimize the contributions of some major educators such as Princeton s John Witherspoon 102 This isn t all bad because it engenders in the reader a desire to revisit the cited original works He has included some wonderful nuggets of gold that cause today s Christian educator to wistfully dream again What if What if the professors in all disciplines would have the passion of a Bonaventure who saw truth and beauty as analogous to experiencing God in the sacrament What if every college had a common room where students selected for intelligence and originality met with teachers for dialogue similar to that of Oriel College in 1822 What if independent minds sans professors just roamed the libraries at random for three or four years meeting with other students and teachers for consultation a la J H

    Original URL path: http://www.directionjournal.org/33/1/building-christian-academy.html (2016-02-16)
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  • Direction: Doubts about Darwin: A History of Intelligent Design
    an agnostic with no religious agenda Denton was more credible Johnson became part of the ID movement as a result of a side by side reading of Denton s book and the strong defense of Darwinism by Peter Dawkins in The Blind Watchmaker 1985 In addition to agreeing with Denton Johnson also concluded that Darwinian macroevolution is ultimately based on the philosophical assumption 122 of naturalism This became his argument in Darwin on Trial Behe s reaction to Denton was anger and frustration that legitimate questions and anomalies were being ignored by Darwinists because they didn t fit the model While the work of Denton and Johnson was primarily anti narrative and designed to generate questions about Darwinism Behe supplied the first positive element with a suggestion of design as necessary to account for irreducibly complex structures He quickly became the most powerful spokesperson for the ID movement to both the scientific establishment and the general public A key accomplishment was to have ID seen as different from literal Genesis creationism thereby gaining a broader hearing for the ideas presented Woodward s rhetorical analysis of ID includes consideration of the basics ethos audience perception of character and credibility pathos feeling emotion and passion apparent and logos grasp of the scientific issues combined with the ability to communicate to a variety of audiences Behe is shown to excel in all areas Johnson as a law professor initially was not credible in the scientific community in two debates with Steven Jay Gould one of the masters of scientific discourse Johnson with style and intelligence was able to establish himself as knowledgeable about evolution I am not aware of another book that provides the history and rhetorical analysis of the ID movement Although it could be used by itself Woodward s book will

    Original URL path: http://www.directionjournal.org/33/1/doubts-about-darwin-history-of.html (2016-02-16)
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  • Direction: Darwin's Proof: The Triumph of Religion over Science
    As an agnostic with no religious agenda Denton was more credible Johnson became part of the ID movement as a result of a side by side reading of Denton s book and the strong defense of Darwinism by Peter Dawkins in The Blind Watchmaker 1985 In addition to agreeing with Denton Johnson also concluded that Darwinian macroevolution is ultimately based on the philosophical assumption 122 of naturalism This became his argument in Darwin on Trial Behe s reaction to Denton was anger and frustration that legitimate questions and anomalies were being ignored by Darwinists because they didn t fit the model While the work of Denton and Johnson was primarily anti narrative and designed to generate questions about Darwinism Behe supplied the first positive element with a suggestion of design as necessary to account for irreducibly complex structures He quickly became the most powerful spokesperson for the ID movement to both the scientific establishment and the general public A key accomplishment was to have ID seen as different from literal Genesis creationism thereby gaining a broader hearing for the ideas presented Woodward s rhetorical analysis of ID includes consideration of the basics ethos audience perception of character and credibility pathos feeling emotion and passion apparent and logos grasp of the scientific issues combined with the ability to communicate to a variety of audiences Behe is shown to excel in all areas Johnson as a law professor initially was not credible in the scientific community in two debates with Steven Jay Gould one of the masters of scientific discourse Johnson with style and intelligence was able to establish himself as knowledgeable about evolution I am not aware of another book that provides the history and rhetorical analysis of the ID movement Although it could be used by itself Woodward s book

    Original URL path: http://www.directionjournal.org/33/1/darwins-proof-triumph-of-religion-over.html (2016-02-16)
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  • Direction: Worldview: The History of a Concept
    worldview of this conceptual baggage and to replace the historical connotations with the proper biblical content He focuses chapter nine on exactly what this biblical content is Naugle s philosophical reflections culminate with two main claims first that worldview is best understood as a semiotic phenomenon and second that worldview is an inescapable function of the human heart By semiotic phenomenon Naugle means that worldview is a system 124 of signs and more specifically a system of narrative signs since humans inherently need stories to signify certain aspects of reality which in turn helps them to understand the world 300 Naugle provides a separate argument for the inescapability of worldview His ongoing theme declares there is no impartial ground from which to reason or interpret reality And his support for this claim is basically an invitation to reflect historically on the shortcomings of the Enlightenment project which aimed to understand reality through pure reason supposedly untainted by prejudice or tradition Naugle reiterates the Gadamerian claim that the Enlightenment was plagued with a prejudice against prejudice In other words Enlightenment figures were motivated to overcome prejudice even though that motivation was itself an expression of prejudice Since any attempt to overcome prejudice is self defeating prejudice itself must be inescapable and correspondingly so is worldview Unfortunately Naugle s philosophical reflections involve a few ambiguities in key places one example being his discussion on realism and antirealism Here I believe Naugle overlooks a practical distinction between epistemological realism antirealism and metaphysical realism antirealism The former delineation primarily concerns perceptual and perhaps memory beliefs though it says very little about nonperceptual beliefs regarding say the origin of the universe or the existence of God Under this delineation the debate turns on the presence of an interpositioned mental entity between the perceiver and physical

    Original URL path: http://www.directionjournal.org/33/1/worldview-history-of-concept.html (2016-02-16)
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  • Direction: Current Research
    July 2003 2 5 CMU What is Faith The Messenger 12 March 2003 3 4 CMU Guenther Titus Studying the Faith with Cuban Church Leaders Vision 4 2 2003 75 79 CMU Why Missional Church Canadian Mennonite 24 February 2003 8 CMU Heidebrecht Doug Continuing the Conversation Christian Leader January 2003 12 16 BC 128 Huebner Chris K Bioethics and the Church Technology Martyrdom and the Moral Significance of the Ordinary Vision 4 1 2003 74 81 CMU Peace and War in the Nation State and Beyond A Response to George Weigel Moral Clarity in a Time of War Mennonite Life 58 June 2003 www bethelks edu mennonitelife 2003June huebner php CMU Hiebert Dan Truth on Trial Mennonite Brethren Herald 13 June 2003 4 5 CBC Holm Jim A Personal Tribute to Henry Schmidt Christian Leader June 2003 36 MBBS The North American MB Call to Pastoral Leadership Direction 32 fall 2003 202 12 MBBS Hughes Jones Alicia Reconciling America s Divided Society Through Religious Revitalization Direction 32 spring 2003 10 20 TC Hunt Karol Leisure Christian Leader July 2003 4 7 TC Isaac Donald J Work and Christian Calling Direction 32 fall 2003 184 92 TC Isaak Jon The Christian Community and Political Responsibility Romans 13 1 7 Direction 32 spring 2003 32 46 MBBS Janzen Gerald Divine Warfare and Nonresistance Direction 32 spring 2003 21 31 CBC Janzen Rod Scholarship and the Church Christian Leader November 2003 10 12 FPU Jost Lynn Abimelech and Nahor In Dictionary of the Old Testament Pentateuch ed T Desmond Alexander and David W Baker 6 8 585 86 Downers Grove IL InterVarsity 2003 TC Baptism and Church Membership At the Heart of a Believer s Life Christian Leader July 2003 36 TC Fourth Sunday of Advent Year C Preaching Word Witness 21 December 2003 13 16 TC The Sermon What Will You Do with Jesus Preaching Word Witness 18 April 2003 99 100 TC The Third Way Christian Leader January 2003 4 8 TC Why Not Share Church Leadership Christian Leader May 2003 9 TC Koop Karl Catechisms in the Mennonite Tradition Vision 4 2 fall 2003 28 35 CMU Menno Simons The Encylopedia of Christianity vol 3 491 493 Leiden E J Brill and Grand Rapids MI Eerdmans 2003 CMU 129 Schleitheim Confession The Encyclopedia of Protestantism ed by Hans J Hillerbrand London and New York Routledge 2003 CMU Täuferisch mennonitische Bekenntnisse Ein umstrittenes Vermächtnis Mennonitische Geschichtsblätter 60 2003 23 42 CMU Kyle Richard Family of Love In Encyclopedia USA ed Donald W Whisenhunt 224 26 Gulf Breeze FL International Academic 2003 TC John Knox and the Care of Souls Calvin Theological Journal 38 1 2003 125 38 TC Loewen Wendell The Changing Face of Adolescence Christian Leader August 2003 8 11 TC Martens Elmer A How Is the Christian to Construe Old Testament Law Bulletin for Biblical Research 12 1 2002 199 216 MBBS Sin Guilt In Dictionary of the Old Testament Pentateuch ed T Desmond Alexander and David W

    Original URL path: http://www.directionjournal.org/33/1/current-research.html (2016-02-16)
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  • Direction: From the Editor: Vocation
    may be conceived on three levels The primary level concerns a fundamental reconciliation with our Creator From an Anabaptist perspective this must be understood to include a corporate relationship with God through God s people The secondary level of calling also with individual and corporate dimensions is a summons to mission The biblical roots of this mission are found in two places in particular the creation texts of Genesis 1 26 30 and 2 15 the creation mandate to both rule over and serve the rest of God s creation and Matthew 28 18 20 the great commission to go and make disciples of Jesus Christ One might also consider a third level of calling the immediate or urgent The latter is the locus of such matters as helping a neighbor move fighting a fire changing diapers and pulling one s ox from the ditch all of which have some connection to one s mission but are not necessarily at the heart of that mission The secondary level is where the articles in this issue of Direction have their focus And the interrelation of the creation mandate and the great commission is where they are energized but also partially in 152 tension I propose and believe these authors would agree that believers are called to a variety of manifestations of the creation mandate great commission mix and that there is a call to ministry for each believer whatever the mix This is secondary level vocation We might also ponder a variety of ways in which a job or profession intersects with a person s vocation for some very happily and for others perhaps very little HISTORICAL CONTEXT TWO DISTORTIONS To put the arguments of several of our authors into historical context the matter of vocation can be likened to traveling by horseback If one can avoid slipping off the back or being tossed off the front of the horse there still remains the danger of falling off on the left side or the right When riding the noble steed Vocation in Western culture Catholics have tended to fall off on one side and Protestants the other The Catholic Distortion of vocation urges for a two level understanding of Christian faith and mission At the premium level are those persons in full time Christian service often employed by the church devoted wholly to its tasks and activities On the second permitted level are those persons whose working lives are given to everything else a kind of second class existence lacking in complete faith commitment and from which not as much is expected The truths being valued here are the importance of the great commission and the reality that leadership within God s people is indeed vital so that leaders have much expected of them But the distortion is a depreciation of the creation mandate and the possibility of marketplace ministry The articles of Bystrom Toews and Isaac suggest that this kind of two level thinking about vocation may have taken subtle

    Original URL path: http://www.directionjournal.org/32/2/editorial.html (2016-02-16)
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  • Direction: Ministers of Commerce: Fifty Years of MEDA's Mission
    aimed to help those in business to be more deliberate about their ethical behavior and to provide a place where businesspersons and their critics could get together and talk things out This group was called Church Industry and Business Associates CIBA Among the Mennonite Brethren involved from the start were the late A A DeFehr of Winnipeg and his son Arthur today the president of Palliser Furniture Four years later another larger business group formed Some in the Mennonite community had felt that CIBA catered to big operators such as owners of large factories and agribusiness firms What about the smaller mom and pop businesses Several hundred smaller business operators formed their own organization called Mennonite Business Associates MBA Its purpose was to provide Christian fellowship stimulate Christian witness in business and encourage Christian ethics It soon became obvious that both CIBA and MBA were appealing to the same clientele In 1976 the two groups merged to form Mennonite Industry and Business Associates MIBA This new group sought to incorporate the concerns and interests of both large and small businesses It has been said that wherever two or three Mennonites gather together they will form an organization Another thing they will do is hold a conference By now both groups MIBA and MEDA were holding regular meetings It became apparent that a lot of the same people were coming to both groups In fact nearly all the members of MEDA were also members of MIBA Why not merge again someone wondered In 1981 after a few years of flirting and courtship the two organizations did in fact merge The language used was that of a wedding Erland Waltner a Mennonite leader of the day preached the wedding sermon entitled A United Witness in the Business World The name 160 MEDA was retained because of its tax exempt history in both Canada and the United States MEDA TODAY Today MEDA is a hybrid organization with a dual purpose To help businesspeople see their work as a form of ministry and thereby integrate their faith with their business To use the skills and resources of businesspeople to help the poor in underdeveloped countries MEDA s membership numbers some three thousand in Canada and the United States It has programs in eight countries and activities with spin off implications in many more There are microenterprise programs production and marketing programs for rural producers a trading company a consulting company a business development department and an investment fund Its most visible event is an annual convention that rotates around North America and typically draws four hundred to six hundred people MEDA publishes a bimonthly magazine The Marketplace which has a circulation of sixty five hundred in Canada and the U S MEDA has offices in Waterloo Ontario Winnipeg Manitoba and Lancaster Pennsylvania as well as in eight overseas locations There are one hundred seventy five employees around the world most of them non North American MEDA also works with ten ASSETS programs in Canada the U S and Mexico to help low income people start or expand small businesses In a typical year MEDA will help ten thousand of the world s poor with small loans and business assistance MEDA is known worldwide for its expertise in microenterprise development having been one of the pioneers of this movement in the mid 1980s Today there are four hundred agencies doing this kind of work When all aspects of its work are considered including consulting trade and currency transactions MEDA is involved in more than half of the low income countries of the world Some have called MEDA the mission arm of the Mennonite business community This mission is grounded in a larger understanding of ministry in daily life MEDA members are encouraged to see themselves as God s agents in daily life believing that not everyone is called to be a pastor or full time church worker MEDA members are not content to simply sit in the church pew as second class citizens who pay pray and obey As people in business and the professions they feel 161 called to work in the trenches and to be God s junior partners in the ongoing work of creation and redemption WHAT WE BELIEVE MEDA s faith statement has been articulated as follows We believe in God who created us redeemed us through the resurrection of Jesus Christ empowers us through the Holy Spirit and calls us together as Christ s body the church Our task is to bear witness to our life in Christ by being agents of God s caring sustaining and transforming activity characterized by love peace and justice for all These beliefs undergird MEDA s organizational mission statement MEDA is an association of Christians in business and the professions committed to applying biblical teachings in the marketplace MEDA members share their faith abilities and resources to address human needs through economic development Some of our assumptions include the following We believe work has intrinsic worth it is not valued only because of what it produces We believe God wants humanity to enjoy spiritual physical economic and social well being The biblical call to do justice compels us to empower the disadvantaged and seek more equitable opportunity Stewardship means using our resources for the fuller development of the resources of all Compassion means we respond to Scripture s clearly stated concern for the poor Christian love and by extension a commitment to human dignity forms the basis of all our relationships In our work and involvements we seek to affirm and enhance life and to avoid supporting that which harms or diminishes life The term bear witness in the faith statement means we seek to do God s will We believe God s will is not only that people be redeemed but also that they be brought closer to what was originally intended for 162 them The Good News is not only good news for individuals it is also good news for society The

    Original URL path: http://www.directionjournal.org/32/2/ministers-of-commerce-fifty-years-of.html (2016-02-16)
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