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  • Direction: God as Worker: How It Affects Life and Ministry
    God s work we can see God s hand in our everyday tasks Unless we do so we will underestimate the importance of God s work and either worship our work or think it worthless 11 God s Work Is a Model for Us Third the work of God while it is unique is a model for human work God s work can be correlated with human work 12 For example we tend to prize and value the work of evangelists pastors and apologists for the faith because what they do connects so readily to God s own work as Redeemer Unfortunately writes Robert Banks in some quarters it is only when someone is engaged in these activities 169 that they are regarded as doing God s work 13 We need to rediscover the fact that the work God does is far broader than Christ s work of reconciling people or helping them grow together in faith and obedience To be sure God s redeeming and transforming work is central to his plan for humankind But God is also Creator Sustainer Preserver Provider Revealer and Lawgiver to mention only a few of his many other occupational hats All of this means that everyone who does legitimate work should be able to say My work is God s work For example the work of a teacher could be said to reflect something of God s desire to reveal truth to people The work of a doctor reflects something of God s healing power and gift The work of a musician reflects something of God s creative ability The work of a secretary involved in scheduling appointments reflects something of God s own love of order In other words we should all be able to say My work is God s work 14 An Important Issue for Evangelism Fourth the image of God the worker communicates an important message to persons outside the church As evangelists and apologists of the Christian faith we are always looking for points of contact between our message and the life experiences of those outside the faith If we bypass the world of work says Banks we miss one of the most fruitful points of contact we have available 15 Most adults spend more time at their workplace than anywhere else The average person spends some eighty eight thousand hours on the job from the first day of full time employment until the retirement celebration 16 Work occupies so much of their lives Says Banks It is therefore crucial for the gospel to interact with this sphere of life We have an opportunity to show people that God is highly interested in work that God understands the possibilities and frustrations of work that God knows the complexities involved in depending on others at work that God is also concerned to balance work and rest and above all that the world of work is not strange to God that God is a worker 17 The Church Needs Worker

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  • Direction: Ministers in the Marketplace
    work of naming animals and birds Genesis 2 19 To Moses God gave the responsibility of leading captive Israelites out of Egypt Exod 3 19 To the disciples Jesus entrusted the work of distributing bread and fish to a hungry crowd Matt 14 16 To Peter God gave the task of explaining Pentecost to Jerusalem residents and visitors Acts 2 According to 1 Timothy 5 8 providing for the daily needs of one s relatives and family is a natural outgrowth of Christian faith Proverbs in various ways proclaims the worth of work All hard work brings a profit but mere talk leads only to poverty 14 23 NIV passim Do you see a man skilled in his work He will serve before kings he will not serve before obscure men 22 29 He who works his land will have abundant food but the one who chases fantasies will have his fill of poverty 28 19 Give her the reward she has earned and let her works bring her praise at the city gate 31 31 The last citation Proverbs 31 devotes significant space to enumerating the virtuous woman s skill and capacity for work it is readily apparent that she is at home in the marketplace Work is part of God s design for people and is therefore inherently worthwhile to the kingdom of God One quickly gains a sense of a church s value system by the stories it tells the people it profiles the causes it addresses and the issues it elevates The church demonstrates its understanding of God s design for the marketplace when it takes the efforts of marketplace ministers seriously when it gives voice in its corporate life to faithful marketplace laborers and their stories and when it grapples sincerely with the various dilemmas e g financial ethical which businesspeople face God s People Need to Be Equipped Some Christians are of the opinion that in the church the pastor is the main doer and all others are part of the passive supporting cast The words lay people or laity are sometimes used to differentiate between nonpastors and pastors But the Bible never uses the word in this way Rather laos is a term of honor to describe the whole people of God Peter says But you are a chosen people a royal priesthood a holy nation a laity belonging to God that you may declare the praises of him who called you out of darkness into his wonderful light Once you were not a laity but now you are the laity of God once you had 178 not received mercy but now you have received mercy 1 Pet 2 9 10 In God s economy the laity is comprised of all believers making pastors part of laity Pastors are not special in a set apart sense They simply have a specific role to play in believers lives to equip them for useful kingdom work Nor are pastors to equip people to do church work or to lighten the pastor s load Pastors together with other under equippers listed in Ephesians 4 11 are called of God to equip Eph 4 12 7 the chosen people royal priests and fellow laity for works of service so that the body of Christ may be built up until we all reach unity in the faith and in the knowledge of the Son of God and become mature attaining to the whole measure of the fullness of Christ 4 12 13 so that each part can do its work 4 16 According to Ephesians 4 it is the job of some laity that is apostles prophets evangelists pastors and teachers to make themselves useful in equipping other laity that is plumbers interior designers and engineers for kingdom purposes The role of the equipper is that of teaching though not necessarily in a sermon sense Equippers aim to present people with the power and the substance of the word of God 1 Thess 5 14 Equipping has to do with repairing and preparing all laity to be effective kingdom laborers Heb 13 20 21 These spiritual equippers construct a biblical foundation for living so that whether the issues being faced are ethical relational financial or something else marketplace people find themselves equipped to respond in kingdom ways And they do so mindful that equipping is inherently relational and does not occur in isolation One indicator that people have been well equipped is always the understanding that they are part of a community that they are not alone Their individual occupations are important to their community of faith and the body of Christ of which they are part recognizes them as vital components 1 Cor 12 11 31 Knowing that equippers and the church are deeply interested in their lives and occupations gives marketplace ministers courage joy and fulfillment in their work Pastors and Members Need to Understand Each Other Understandings gained in isolation are one sided at best and are rarely accurate or durable True understanding occurs through intentional relationships forged through sustained interaction It is this sort of interaction that needs to innervate churches particularly pastors and their marketplace ministry laborers Marketplace workers have an obligation to round out the understandings of their spiritual equippers 179 Plumbers interior designers and engineers can take the initiative in ensuring that their spiritual equippers grasp just how complex and demanding the marketplace can be Pastors need to understand the marketplace and believers who work in it While they cannot be and should not try to be experts in every field and occupation they can become knowledgeable by simply taking an active interest in the issues marketplace people talk about What makes a market bullish How does the global economy affect local manufacturing How does SARS affect hospital staff morale How exactly does one find oil deep underground or under the ocean floor How do competition the presence of a labor union or a shortage of capital affect a business leader

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  • Direction: Work and Christian Calling
    based on the traditions of the Greek view of law and the Judeo Christian vision of souls all equal in the sight of God Initially it excluded women and slaves but citizens began to achieve equality before the law and the threat of tyranny Ward here is talking about the beginnings of what we call our constitution and bill of rights Equality before the law gave the citizen a final sense of integrity against the tyranny of a single leader or the tyranny of an arbitrary majority Here we find the seeds of the modern human rights movement What emerged to dominant positions in Western civilizations especially were people and groups who had never achieved such breakthroughs in other civilizations Democratic ownership and power is inextricably linked to law and equality Ward s second great idea is what she calls this worldliness an immense interest in this world and how it can be set to work to improve life The Greek understanding of law and science derives confidence in a material universe orderly and predictable That the whole of God s creation is to not only be respected and cared for as a stewardship but to be explored is the Judeo Christian inheritance While other Eastern cultures accepted the world as fleeting and unchangeable the Christian sees in creation opportunity and hope best expressed in the Messiah s mission as deliverance and salvation Such ideas says Ward over the centuries became transmuted into this worldly terms of being able to see hope ahead and of working for a better future not hereafter but here and now 4 Early Western societies thus identified work as God s work and a way to build the kingdom now But they were frugal too Material progress always requires savings Medicine and public health the third of Ward s great ideas is an outgrowth of the first two Better health and longer lifespan produced a boost to economic growth in expanding countries The final idea behind the growth of Western societies is the application of savings and capital to produce a better life in the future The eighteenth century produced an enormous expansion in our understanding of science of inventions and in applying tools and techniques to increase the efficiency of labor A CHRISTIAN CHALLENGE TO NOTIONS OF PROGRESS AND GROWTH Ward s review of how Western nations became wealthy is useful not so much as grand formula there are many exceptions and abuses but for its roots in creation and the Creator Howard Loewen provides a 188 useful way of moderating Ward s optimistic this worldliness 5 The problem with progress and growth says Loewen is the assumption that more and more is always better As actors in the garden of creation should we not be concerned about preservation as well as production Economic growth and the lifestyle choices we make must always be done with recognition that we are caretakers that all goods belong to God While Ward acknowledges that theology has been secularized into materialism Loewen asks whether religion can work in business Has there not been a tragic separation of the sacred and the secular in our business world so that the business person becomes schizophrenic alternating between the realism of the business world and the idealism of Christian faith Has the Protestant Mennonite work ethic become secularized Do we still have a strong sense of vocation or calling or meaning in our work 6 Though not addressing directly the question of how we identify a calling Loewen emphasizes the biblical approach to integrated living A theology of creation requires stewardship which does not separate the secular from the sacred When we do separate them we lose meaning in our daily work and our set of values and ethics becomes divided Work as our calling is where we exercise faith and godliness Work as well as our possessions are a gift from God to be held in stewardship 7 This holistic approach to life then becomes one standard by which to distinguish genuine from false concepts of calling NOT ALL WORK IS GOD S WORK It is in integrated wholeness that we offer our lives to the work of the kingdom But what is kingdom work Is it different from my current job And if all work is God s work what difference does it make which one I am called into We are first of all called into salvation a holy virtuous life of selflessness This macro call of a Jesus follower must limit our professional choices We are not called into success or comfort or happiness In the letter to the church at Colossians Paul writes Whatever you 189 do work at it with all your heart as working for the Lord not for human masters since you know that you will receive an inheritance from the Lord as a reward It is the Lord Christ you are serving Col 3 23 24 Working with all one s heart is at least implicit in most job descriptions It is good motivation good personal psychology good advice It is what I learned as a child on the farm It is advice respected by the farmer the soldier the bartender the fashion model use the abilities you have to do the best job you can But the modifying phrases in Colossians change everything not all work is God s work 8 Grandfather Isaak was probably called to the position of associate pastor of the Alexanderpol MB church by casting the lot In his service with the church he made at least two trips to visit and minister to young Mennonite men drafted by the military but working in civilian service conservation camps 9 His farm work handled by the older sons and hired workers allowed him this form of service But as an educated person he also knew the scriptural teachings well He would have felt then as perhaps pastors do today that one should not enter Christian service in the

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  • Direction: Rediscovering the Calling and Sending Church
    body is gifted for the benefit of the whole 196 body v 7 and that this is the determination of the Holy Spirit v 11 Renewing a culture of discernment considers that the Holy Spirit endows the church with all of the spiritual gifts it needs I urge that the biblical discipline of discernment of spiritual gifts be renewed in our churches for the benefit of all believers and the body as a whole One of the benefits of such a renewal of discernment may be that those with the gifting necessary to serve as pastors would be found already in the local church This is the biblical ideal and has happened in many cases When those persons are identified next steps include a gathering of experience and education as emerging leaders are equipped for the ministry vocation to which their gifting has called them The Inadequacy of Present Practice Practically our pastoral preparation and placement patterns have lead to another sort of problem As a pastor friend of mine has said Candidating is a lot like going to bed on the first date a lot of action based on attraction rather than on depth of relationship This kind of problem arises when we overlook the discernment and development of spiritually gifted people in the local church However when we foster a culture of discernment that assumes that God has already gifted us with what we need within the church we will look for leaders who are already among us We will know their foibles and follies and embrace them anyway Their histories will taint them but then again our history as a church taints us all and we do not walk away from each other because of it When we discern who will lead us we do everything in our power to prepare equip and support that person in the call that God and the local church extend I have no illusion that this is easy In fact I would suggest that it is much more difficult than our current patterns of hiring pastors externally But I believe it is by far preferable to a hiring process that has at its core a series of assumptions and accommodations that defer to our culture s addiction to individualism Roots of Resistance to a Culture of Discernment I suspect that our greatest resistance to renewing a culture of discernment comes in a constellation of related issues I will not develop these issues here but will name some of them Hesitance to understand the gifting of the Holy Spirit as determinative in the life of the believer and to accept the corresponding loss of individual choice 197 Hesitance on the part of the local church body to take responsibility for discerning calling and equipping a person for ministry because of the real costs it implies for the church and for the individual Hesitance on the part of the local church to invest themselves in the nurture of an emerging leader and a preference for hiring a finished product for a pastor Hesitance on the part of individuals to invite or accept the discernment of the church as authoritative in their lives and a corresponding hesitance on the part of the local church to speak with words of specific blessing or direction towards any given individual HOW HEARING THE CALL CAN HELP CONGREGATIONS A call to vocational ministry has three elements which complement each other an individual s inner call divine awareness the call as discovered through spiritual gifts skills and aptitudes and the call of a faith community While there may be exceptions to this three fold pattern Hearing the Call initiatives affirm and seek to strengthen opportunities for participating churches to engage in such leadership gift discernment Youth are given the opportunity to explore ministry as a vocational choice and thus to become sensitive to the various general and specific calls claims God has made on their lives Developing a culture of discernment comes only after much practice Initially it seems awkward and sometimes even artificial Yet after a time it can become the chosen route for seeking and developing another generation of leaders Becoming a leader has always required individual initiative Yet we know that the call of God still finds significant voice in and through the local church Those in leadership regularly illustrate this by pointing to the advocates supporters sponsors and mentors who have opened doors of opportunity and windows of understanding for them PROJECT PRIORITIES The Hearing the Call project is comprised of three related priorities The primary project activity is Ministry Quest a program which directly engages high school youth in a two year journey exploring pastoral leadership congregational leadership and missional leadership Ministry Quest activities may be briefly described as three leadership retreats supporting a two year mentoring relationship in the local church A significant secondary activity is supporting our congregations by helping to renew a culture of discernment and leadership development Our hope is to work with every congregation that has youth 198 participating in Ministry Quest A third purpose is to strengthen communication between our denominational ministries working with youth in training and the sending congregations of these youth While none of these project purposes is particularly original implementing them has not been seriously undertaken as a denominational effort A glance over our past indicates that we have taken ministry preparation very seriously Individual congregations have strong histories of calling and sending people into ministry Our schools and mission initiatives have had a strong entrepreneurial bent with significant regional ownership In spite of this positive history of calling training and sending people into ministry relatively little communication takes place between our denominational ministries and the sending congregation about the ongoing development of our youth Too often youth have moved among the congregation the camp and the school and had to begin the leadership development process as if they had no previous experience Some will continue despite this frustration while others will disengage and

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  • Direction: The North American MB Call to Pastoral Leadership
    includes bulletin inserts sermon outlines worship suggestions posters Bible study lessons etc The Lutheran Church reports that in four years of following this program they have had more than three hundred names submitted and every one of those persons has had a personal interview with their pastor 11 Mennonite Brethren denominational leaders would do well to consider this program BIBLICAL FOUNDATIONS FOR CALLING PASTORAL LEADERS It is immediately clear from the Scriptures that there is no uniform pattern of calling and commissioning leaders However there is one Old Testament leader who serves especially well as a model for addressing the need that exists in the MB church today Joshua went through a long and careful mentoring process directed by Moses That process can be traced through the pages of the Pentateuch Bobby Clinton and Katherine Haubert note that Joshua provides a good biblical model for leadership development under mentoring influence 12 Joshua is introduced in Exodus 17 as if he was already known to the readers His family heritage was impressive His grandfather Elishama was a captain and the head of the tribe of Ephraim Num 1 10 2 18 How Joshua came to the attention of Moses is not known but Moses called on Joshua to lead the Hebrew troops into battle as recorded in Exodus 17 This demonstrates that from the very beginning Joshua was given tasks that tested his leadership ability His assignments were important ones with real consequences should he fail Other insights about Joshua s training include the following He was an aide to Moses the only person who received that designation He learned the discipline of solitude when he went with his mentor up 207 Mount Sinai where Moses received commandments from God Exod 24 He saw how Moses dealt with conflict in the incident of the golden calf Exod 32 and 33 He learned to receive rebuke Num 11 from his mentor without giving up In perhaps the greatest crisis of his training Joshua stood up against the entire assembly of Israel when the people wanted to reject Moses after the visit of the twelve spies to the land of promise Num 13 and 14 In addition Joshua was publicly encouraged and commissioned for his leadership role Moses took the lead in this ordination ceremony Num 27 12 23 following God s clear direction Moses was to lay hands on Joshua thus symbolizing the blessing which would rest upon the younger man Then Joshua was to stand before the entire congregation and there Moses was to publicly affirm this man and give some of Moses authority to Joshua The open recognition of a new leader especially when that recognition is given by another who is already a respected leader is an important part of leadership calling and training Finally Moses was told to encourage Joshua Deut 1 38 If Joshua was to earn the respect of the people he would one day lead he would need to be encouraged to lead with strength As one reads the rest of the story it is clear that Moses mentoring process was a success Joshua became the leader who did what Moses was unable to do he led the people across the Jordan River and into the Promised Land The New Testament contains a wealth of information on the call and training of leaders It is clear that Jesus set out to form a community of disciples He determined to gather around himself people who would help to fulfill his mission Jesus enters into what can best be called a mentoring relationship with his followers From the very beginning he laid out a clear objective for them They were to fish for people Jesus saw potential in people and called on them to develop that potential That reality should not be missed Jesus had eyes that looked not only at who people were but also at who they could become The details of Jesus plan for training his followers have been well documented in such classic works as those of A B Bruce and Robert Coleman 13 However at the foundation Jesus intention was that his disciples would spend time with him and he would give them ministry tasks to complete They were to have access to Jesus and they could watch him in ministry asking questions about things he said or did that they did not understand Four lessons can be learned from the ministry of Jesus with his followers There is the lesson of observation He took the disciples with him They saw him at weddings funerals in evangelism and in the 208 ministry of healing They saw him pray and watched him when he was alone Second is the lesson of participation They began to baptize converts early in their ministry with Jesus They prayed with him and asked him to teach them how to pray Third there is the lesson of delegation Jesus assigned work for them to do Luke 9 and 10 demonstrate an example of this Finally there is the lesson of commissioning as Jesus sent them out into the world to carry on his work Church leaders can learn from Jesus A plan for raising up and training leaders is essential to carry on the training of workers for the harvest As one reads the prayer of Jesus in John 17 it becomes clear that the training of these followers was the principal focus of Jesus earthly ministry The rest of the New Testament reinforces this emphasis on training and mentoring leaders Paul with Timothy or Titus and Barnabas with John Mark all illustrate that it was the intention of the early church leaders to teach and encourage those younger people who were gifted for leadership and to train them on the front lines to assume the role of pastoring the next generation Ron Clouzet in a doctoral research project at Fuller Seminary noted several characteristics of Paul s method of training leaders Clouzet found that the call to

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  • Direction: Thank God for Tears: Diaries of Susie Baltzer Kiehn
    program and by the Chinese people who were strongly male dominated Paulina Foote an MB who worked with Susie in China wrote perceptively on the role of missionary women in her book God s Hand over My Nineteen Years in China Hillsboro KS MB Publishing House 1962 In it Paulina wonders about the purpose of her ordination Why should she be ordained since she was not permitted to minister to men If she were speaking to a group of Chinese women and a man walked into the crowd should she stop speaking For Paulina the answer came during her ordination service The preacher chose to speak on the Easter text in which Mary Magdalene and the other women discover that Christ is risen In the familiar story the women run to tell the disciples It was the perfect message for Paulina The first missionaries the first believers who brought the message of the good news the gospel were women And they brought the gospel to men It cannot be denied that the work of missionary women particularly single women both in the field and in their reports to home churches during their furloughs did much to open the door for women in ministry In the best cases it was clear that God had gifted women in equal proportion to men when it came to public ministry Susie does not mention this concern in her diary She was quite used to the identity of women in her family and in her church But her diary shows that she was capable of public speaking in churches as well 218 as hard physical labor It was not until June 18 1922 three years after arriving in China that Susie recorded my first experience in leading the meetings This was because all of the missionary men were out of town Even then Susie deferred to the Chinese pastor Puo Ta Sao for the sermon On October 21 1922 Susie recorded The evangelist Dallion and I drove out to the villages We were in four villages This is the first time I drove out alone with the Chinese OFF TO CHINA On November 21 1919 Susie and Mary DeGarmo another single missionary left home on the four o clock train Susie s brother Ben came with them to the station and saw them off probably to San Francisco From there an ocean voyage to China typically took at least twenty one days making her arrival sometime in mid December Susie had concerns about what was ahead but she also had the encouragement of family members already there Her older sister Sarah had served in China since 1913 and her brother and sister in law Peter P and Lydia Maier Baltzer had arrived there in 1917 She knew that her primary role would be to care for domestic tasks and work with missionary children She would teach Chinese women and perhaps care for the girls in the orphanage These were the expected tasks of women The first two hurdles she had to overcome upon arriving on the field were language acquisition and cultural adjustment The language challenge was undertaken immediately On May 18 1920 only six months after she arrived she wrote I took my exam in reading the first chapter of John to my brother He gave me 98 in it And daily she met with a Chinese teacher who taught her out of the Bible even though he was not a believer Within a year Susie was able to present memorized testimonies to Chinese women Eventually she mastered the spoken and written language sufficiently to spread the gospel in the villages and to work with orphaned children The cultural adjustment was also a challenge Even with a brother and a sister in China Susie was given to bouts of weeping May 24 1920 And in the afternoon had a good cry Susie s underlining the enemy tried in all ways to discourage me but I finally found Romans 15 13 July 20 1920 had a good cry July 23 1920 had a good cry 219 One of her greatest trials came on May 5 1921 less than seventeen months after beginning her assignment A telegram arrived from Honolulu Sarah died on sic hearts disease remains taken to San Francisco Birkey Her sister was on her way home for furlough when she died at sea Sarah had spent eleven years working at the Sprunger orphanage in Berne Indiana and then had continued with orphanage work in China since 1913 Susie wrote I bathed myself in tears August 10 1921 Praise God for tears GOING ON IN SPITE OF TEARS Though the going was often rough Susie never shirked her assignment She met regularly with her language instructor she accompanied more experienced missionary women on house visits and she accepted the advice and sometimes admonishment of her coworkers July 13 1922 Sister Mary Schmidt gave me an awful rebuke about receiving the women She said in all her years of institutional life she never worked with such a cranky person together as I was As with most difficulties in her life Susie took this rebuke to the Lord in prayer She had a box of verses filled with scriptural words of encouragement and comfort From this box she would draw at random until she found courage to continue Her first assignment was to assist at the main compound in Tsao Hsien where H C Bartel had established the center of his mission May 26 1920 Mary De Garmo was given the kitchen and I shall over see the house The Bartel house was more like a hotel It provided housing for Susie Mary DeGarmo Mr and Mrs Bartel and their children and from time to time other missionary families It had a main floor an upstairs and an attic It was surrounded by a large garden The stream of names that appear in the diary reflects the numerous contacts Susie had with missionaries either as they

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  • Direction: Why I Do What I Do
    personal query Do I love Jesus Where am I at with Jesus How passionate is my spirituality It s not primarily about my leadership ability my theological training my administrative savvy or my preaching skills as important as these may be It is more foundationally about whether I love Jesus That is the starting point I continually need to come back to because if I don t my pastoring grows out of a love for something other than my love for Jesus And that can be dangerous even idolatrous But that is not all In John 21 Jesus raises a second issue with Peter that of shepherding Do you love me Then feed my lambs Tend my flock Feed my sheep It is ironic Here Jesus asks Peter a fisherman by trade to go work with sheep Instead of eating one s fill of fish chips it is now about feeding and caring for little lambs for hungry sheep It is no longer all about me It s about community and God s place for me among the people of God BIBLE SCHOOL FAITH Looking back I remember graduating from Bible school with a Bachelor of Religious Education Degree My major Pastoral Ministries That I thought was what I was going to do But the next two to three years of University rounding off a liberal arts degree working at 227 various jobs from tree planting to raspberry farming to grocery store shelving ditch digging and camp directing turned my Bible school faith inside out I recall agonizing whether I should move to California not for the sand and the surf but to go to seminary in Fresno in those years voted the least desirable U S city to live in What should I do Well I ended up going to seminary but I did it to get away from the church to pursue an academic degree in biblical theological studies and set myself up for a Ph D or a career as a peace mercenary with Mennonite Central Committee in Central America I avoided pastor types like the plague No divinity degree for me with its holy voice projection and plastic platitudes I preferred to be fishing relating with real people wrestling with real issues in the real world not playing church being a religious shopkeeper Not a chance Give me fish and chips and dialogue with dock side folks by the sea But while in a part time job paying off my seminary tuition God used a bunch of high school students in a church youth group to show me that pastoral ministry is not about playing church and keeping shop It is about loving Jesus and being human with people as we discover God s grace together Eugene Peterson puts it this way in his book on pastoral integrity The biblical fact is that there are no successful churches There are instead communities of sinners gathered before God week after week in towns and villages all over

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  • Direction: On Vocation
    the Bible says about economics and money Hammond Pete R Paul Stevens and Todd Svanoe The Marketplace Annotated Bibliography A Christian Guide to Books on Work Business and Vocation Downers Grove IL InterVarsity 2002 Two decades ago this book would have been very thin as books on the integration of work business and vocation were scarce Now there are hundreds and more than seven hundred are annotated here providing a handy guide to the best writing available on the ministry of daily life Kreider Carl The Christian Entrepreneur Scottdale PA Herald 1980 When the late Carl Kreider then economics professor at Goshen College wrote this book he was a pioneer in the exploration of what it might mean to see entrepreneurship from a Christian perspective Even after all these years this book still stands tall Kroeker Wally God s Week Has Seven Days Monday Musings for Marketplace Christians Scottdale PA Herald 1998 231 A collection of fifty two weekly reflections on what the priesthood of all believers might mean for Christians in the daily workplace Nash Laura L Believers in Business Nashville TN Thomas Nelson 1994 Can faith and business be reconciled Are Christian values like charity and selflessness out of place in the executive suite Laura Nash examines eighty five Christian CEOs to find what they say about the link of business and faith Nash Laura and Scotty McLennan Church on Sunday Work on Monday The Challenge of Fusing Christian Values with Business Life San Francisco CA Jossey Bass 2001 Two scholars from Harvard and Stanford examine the uneasy detente between business and the church and issue a wake up call to take the relation of spirituality faith and business more seriously Pierce Gregory F Augustine Spirituality Work Ten Ways to Balance Your Life On the Job Chicago IL Loyola 2001 The former president of the National Center for the Laity provides helpful comments on how to expand a sense of God in one s place of work These range from congratulating coworkers to creating some sacred office space to building community with coworkers Redekop Calvin Stephen C Ainlay and Robert Siemens Mennonite Entrepreneurs Baltimore MD Johns Hopkins University Press 1995 Are Mennonite entrepreneurs black sheep in the church or trailblazers seeking new ways to express faith in ways that others can t These authors suggest that Mennonite businesspeople though suspect by some actually lead the way in adjusting our faith values to a culture in flux Rudy John H Moneywise Meditations To Be Found Faithful in God s Audit Scottdale PA Herald 1989 232 A collection of short homey meditations on money John Rudy says money doesn t have to seduce and dominate but can be used for sharing building the church and exercising Christian compassion Salkin Jeffrey K Being God s Partner How to Find the Hidden Link Between Spirituality and Your Work Woodstock VT Jewish Lights 1994 A rabbi shows how God can enter what many dismiss as the most mundane aspect of our lives our

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