archive-org.com » ORG » D » DIXON.ORG

Total: 384

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Symphony in the Garden
    in the Garden 05 09 2015 6 00 PM to 8 00 PM No location provided Description BRING YOUR DANCING SHOES AND JOIN US FOR AN EVENING OF BIG BAND MUSIC BY THE MEMPHIS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA IN A GORGEOUS OUTDOOR SETTING AT THE DIXON GARDENS GATES OPEN AT 4 00 Bring your picnic blankets chairs food wine beer and enjoy a night on the South Lawn with great music Also enjoy hotdogs for sale by Memphis Dawgs acclaimed hotdog vendor Adults 20 child 5 children 6 years and under are free Member Subscriber Adult 12 Child 5 Member Subscriber prices are advanced prices only Same day prices are 20 and 5 Online ticket sales have closed Tickets will be available at the door General admission parking is available in Wright Medical lot the parking garage behind the Dixon Please enter from Cherry Road across from Harding Academy Reserved parking handicapped parking is available in the Dixon lot to capacity with parking pass only Parking on Cherry Rd and Audubon is allowed Drop off is allowed in Dixon entryway Rain date Sunday May 10 2015 Sponsored by Dominion Partners Back To Full Calendar Share with a Friend Share With a Friend

    Original URL path: http://www.dixon.org/default.aspx?p=120688&evtid=378303:5/9/2015 (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • 300th Munch and Learn Recap by Linley Schmidt
    The Dixon Post News Events Event Calendar The Dixon Post Food Truck Fridays Wednesday March 11 2015 300th Munch and Learn Recap by Linley Schmidt March 4th was a milestone for the Dixon s Munch and Learn Series It was our 300th one and because we re proud of the success of this lecture series we pulled out our most loved speaker Kevin Sharp The Dixon Director certainly did not disappoint Not only did he unleash all his knowledge and charm but he brought six dozen cupcakes Kevin s lecture Whistler and Sargent Two American Expats in London was the perfect complement to the Dixon s current exhibition Hail Britannia Six Centuries of British Art from the Berger Collection which includes works by both artists Whistler s Little Housemaid at the Doorway of an Inn Petite Bonne à la Porte d une Auberge from 1889 and Sargent s Rosina Ferrara Head of a Capri Girl from 1878 are both on view in the exhibition The two artists knew each other in London and Kevin recounted their lives and careers and the reasons for their success While both artists were American they spent the majority of their careers in England Therefore qualifying their work to be included in the Hail Britannia exhibition which is even with a few imported artists definitively British Upcoming Munch and Learn March 18 Ideas of Health and Illness in the British World Posted by Chantal Drake at 10 36 AM Share The View from My Window by Nancy Trenthem Mrs Crofts Secret by Kristen Kimberling Comments No Comments yet Leave A Comment Name Please include your contact name E mail Please include your contact email address as a valid email address Comment Please include your comments Please answer the simple math question below to submit the

    Original URL path: http://www.dixon.org/the-dixon-post/posts/300th-munch-and-learn-recap-by-linley-schmidt (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • September 9th Munch and Learn Recap: Fabulous Mixed Borders
    was Hestercombe Gardens which has a beautiful gray border consisting of white gray and lavender hues Our next stop was a house familiar to many of us because of the television show Downton Abbey Highclere features a white border lavender walk secret garden and a recently restored arboretum that was originally established in the 1730 s Sissinghurst has guest quarters on property so one can have all the time one wants to walk around the gardens Sissinghurst is most famous for its white border but also has hot and purple borders Knightshayes Court has a border that is segmented by curved boxwood borders The house also has a border garden that has a tall stone wall creating the perfect backdrop There are several RHS Royal Horticulture Society gardens Hyde Hall has tall boxwood walls Rosemoor has a beautiful hot border and Harlow Carr has a striking border of purple and green Marle Place is a family home where artists have been welcomed making it an artist s colony also One enters the garden through an opening that has been cut in a tall yew hedge Since artists live there the garden contains many whimsical sculptures One of the most fun elements of the garden is a tile wall and staircase made of pieces of broken china and tea pots Linda is the Co President of the Memphis Horticulture Society so she especially loves Holehird which contains England s National Collection of Hydrangeas It is home to the beautiful Holehird purple hydrangea which is a gorgeous purple with a blue eye The National Collection of Astilble is also housed within these gardens The landscape of Holehird is cold and windy so the garden has walls which act as wind breaks Great Dixter was the home of horticulturalist Christopher Lloyd and now

    Original URL path: http://www.dixon.org/the-dixon-post/posts/september-9th-munch-and-learn-recap- (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • The Art of Curating by Kevin Sharp
    hungry Assistant Curators rising Associate Curators experienced full Curators or most coveted of all those who held endowed curator positions My boss Douglas Druick was simultaneously the Prince Trust Curator of Prints and Drawings and the Searle Curator of European Painting With that much title his business card had to be printed on both sides They were all so smart so well studied and knowledgeable I wanted nothing more or less than to be counted among them At the Art Institute of Chicago there were curators of everything African art American arts architecture Asian art European painting European sculpture and decorative arts photography prints and drawings textiles twentieth century art and probably others I am now forgetting All of these disciplines were broad areas of study and collection formation and within each were multiple sub specialties For example where I worked in the Department of Prints and Drawings there were curators with expertise in Italian renaissance and baroque drawings Dutch and Flemish printmaking 19th century French prints and drawings 19th century British printmaking and modern and contemporary prints especially lithography Plus there was a world renowned curator named Anselmo Sam Carini who worked in Prints and Drawings for thirty years and at the Art Institute for more than fifty He was conversant on some level with every one of the 11 000 drawings and 60 000 prints in the collection The breadth of his knowledge was simply remarkable great generalists like Sam barely exist anymore So when I learn that someone is curating their music through Spotify or curating their t shirt collection or getting their news curated by Facebook or any of the dozen other ways I hear the term applied I always smile and think back to 1992 I understand better than most the powerful meaning and attraction

    Original URL path: http://www.dixon.org/the-dixon-post/posts/curating (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Family Studio: Japanese Fan DIY
    half for this Don t worry about being exact eyeball measuring is perfectly fine here It doesn t even need to be a straight line This is the body of your fan If you want to make it a little more fun you could cut a zigzag pattern or a curvy line Color your fan This is where the watercolor pencils came in They re really cool and you can use them a few different ways My favorite is to color my entire image first and then go over it with water It s a surreal experience watching the colors come to life You can also put water down and color into it but the effect isn t as bold The last way to use them is to dip them in water and draw with them Dipping and drawing will create bold lines When you go over your picture with water your colors will mix after all it is paint My best advice is to go over your colors one at a time You can also use the water to your advantage to blend colors where they meet There s no wrong way to decorate your fan Believe me people tried Once you re done with the body of your fan it s time to glue on the craft stick This is going to be the handle for your fan For it to be sturdy at least a third of it should be glued onto the back of the fan You could stop here and be done or you could decorate your handle You can use the watercolor pencils or pull out some markers or even get creative with washi tape Have fun with it If you try this craft at home we would love to see it Post your

    Original URL path: http://www.dixon.org/the-dixon-post/posts/family-studio-japanese-fan-diy (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Do you know about Art to Grow?
    The program has grown dramatically over the past fifteen years and is now teaching art classes to up to 20 000 elementary students a year All of Art to Grow s lessons are hands on and teach students about the wonderful sights at the Dixon Gallery and Gardens The summer is a busy time for Art to Grow The program visits libraries summer camps and other educational institutions in June and July This summer Art to Grow will be focusing on the work of sculptor Jun Kaneko Participants will get to see a variety of images of Kaneko s work and have an active discussion about the art Pre K students will make standing heads and decorate them with detailed patterns using crayons scrapbook paper and stickers Older students will use permanent markers to decorate ceramic tiles Art to Grow is looking forward to participating in lots of community events such as festivals and Farmer s Markets Art to Grow has partnered with the Memphis Farmer s Market to visit three times this summer At each visit Art to Grow will have a craft table where children and their chaperones can stop by and make something fun that correlates with the Market s weekly theme On May 30th we will be making fingerprint hyacinths On June 13th we will be making music shakers using plastic eggs tape and sharpies Then on July 11th we will be making wax resist paintings using blueberry tea Anytime you see the Dixon out in the community please stop by and take part in the fun Art to Grow has already booked sessions all over Memphis and will be visiting hundreds of children this summer We can t wait to get creative and make some awesome art with you Christan Allen Dixon Outreach Coordinator Posted

    Original URL path: http://www.dixon.org/the-dixon-post/posts/do-you-know-about-art-to-grow (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • "Shakespeare Said It!" Munch and Learn Recap by Linley Schmidt
    Cosmopolitans Corporate Membership 1 2 3 4 5 The Dixon Post News Events Event Calendar The Dixon Post Food Truck Fridays Thursday April 16 2015 Shakespeare Said It Munch and Learn Recap by Linley Schmidt This week s Munch and Learn was alfresco The back porch of the Dixon residence is the perfect stage and backdrop for just about anything so it served Rachel Brun and Joey Shaw well as they acted out scenes from several Shakespeare plays Their performance proved to us that we do in fact quote Shakespeare all the time For instance knock knock who s there is from the porter scene in Macbeth Eating me out of house and home is from Henry IV The fault in our stars may be a book and a movie but the phrase was used in Shakespeare s Julius Caesar We even got to witness a sword fight as the actors fought their way up and down the steps from the porch to the patio Rachel and Joey played all the characters from chorus member like cheerleaders to a variety of Shakespeare s main characters They even enlisted the help of a couple of audience members As always they did a great job and further proved that the partnership between the Dixon and the Tennessee Shakespeare Company is a priceless one Posted by Chantal Drake at 10 07 AM Featured Share April 1 Munch and Learn Recap Part 2 by Linley Schmidt The Gift That Keeps On Giving by Sheryl Alexander Comments No Comments yet Leave A Comment Name Please include your contact name E mail Please include your contact email address as a valid email address Comment Please include your comments Please answer the simple math question below to submit the form 2 2 Coming Up Thursday Feb 11

    Original URL path: http://www.dixon.org/the-dixon-post/posts/shakespeare-said-it-munch-and-learn-recap-by-linley-schmidt (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Mexico City with Kevin Sharp, Part One
    the Centro was closed for the day to automobiles and buses a welcome monthly vacation from exhaust fumes for locals and travelers alike but it meant traffic just outside the district would be more congested than usual He was right as we approached the Centro we slowed to a crawl The driver got us as near to the Avenida Juarez as he dared which was not close at all and our first unguided glimpse of the city was from within wave after wave of pedestrians out on Sunday strolls Mexico City is huge nearly 22 000 000 people are packed into its many colonias and a healthy percentage were in the Centro that day I was there for the Association of Art Museum Directors AAMD meeting and looked forward to seeing friends and colleagues We arrived too late to join the sightseeing excursion that had been arranged for the afternoon so we plunged into the Alameda Central the oldest park in Mexico City Alameda Central is filled with fountains and statues and of course people enjoying the beautiful day and each other s company At the west end vendors under bright red canopies sell candy or grilled meats or toys or brightly colored running shoes It is crowded with sights and smells vivid colorful and beautiful in its unguarded candor We got in step with other strollers in the park their pace slower than ours less urgent they had seen it all before they would see it again why hurry We walked past old men with their arms crossed sitting on long curved limestone benches in sometimes heated discussions with their neighbors while just inches away lovers kiss passionately untroubled by all the talk around them We examined the gleaming white Hemicycle Benito Juarez while young skateboarders zipped around it and tourists like us snapped photos with their phones Later we stared confounded at monuments to two Germans Alexander von Humboldt the naturalist explorer and author and his near contemporary Ludwig van Beethoven at either end of the park There must surely be a reason for their presence and there is but they are completely unrelated Humboldt spent nearly a year in Mexico March 1803 March 1804 during his famous explorations of Latin America The bronze sculpture commemorating the 200th anniversary of the start of this epic journey was only dedicated in 1999 The monument to Beethoven was a 1921 gift of German expatriates living in Mexico City to the citizens of the capital At the east end of the Alameda Central just beyond the Beethoven monument we came upon the magnificent Palacio de Bellas Artes It is the national theater a museum and one of the most beautiful buildings in the world It is a hybrid of sorts begun in 1904 as Art Nouveau was taking hold of the popular imagination but not completed until 1934 the age of Art Deco In between the building project was kept from completion by more than a few engineering challenges political turmoil

    Original URL path: http://www.dixon.org/the-dixon-post/posts/mexico-city (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive



  •