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  • Request for Images — Dumbarton Oaks
    fee will be charged for research scanning and processing Payment is by check drawn on a U S bank For payments via credit card please contact 202 339 6410 for additional instructions Individual departments may charge additional fees when appropriate Requests for images from the Dumbarton Oaks Rare Book Collection may have additional requirements and charges Requests will be considered on a case by case basis we regret that sometimes we may not be able to accommodate a request due to the volume or the condition of the materials When filling out the Online Request Form please be as specific as possible about intended use Incomplete image requests may be delayed or returned Requests for commercial use such as advertising will not be approved on any grounds Textbook reproduction fees may apply Please note although they may belong to Dumbarton Oaks images or objects appearing in the images may be protected by copyright publication rights or related interests that are not owned by Dumbarton Oaks In such cases Dumbarton Oaks may not be authorized to grant permission and it will be the requestor s responsibility to contact the appropriate party Upon making a request please allow a minimum of two

    Original URL path: http://www.doaks.org/about/photographic-services/rights-and-reproductions (2016-02-18)
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  • Dumbarton Oaks
    to reset your password fill out the form below and we will send you an email at the address you gave when you registered to start the process of resetting your password Lost Password My user name is If this will not work for you for example if you forgot your user name or your email address has changed contact the site administration Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection 1703

    Original URL path: http://www.doaks.org/Plone/mail_password_form?userid= (2016-02-18)
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  • Dumbarton Oaks
    are closed until further notice Info Error Cookies are not enabled You must enable cookies before you can log in Login Name Password Forgot your password If you have forgotten your password we can send you a new one Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection 1703 32nd Street NW Washington DC 20007 Site Map Web Accessibility Contact Us Visit Us Staff Directory Employment Rights and Reproductions Staff Login Newsletter Webmail

    Original URL path: http://www.doaks.org/login_form (2016-02-18)
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  • The Oaks News, February 2016 — Dumbarton Oaks
    More Claude Monet to Unknown Recipient February 24 1894 Read More From Olympus to the Streets of Constantinople The Byzantine Retirement of the Ancient Gods National Gallery of Art West Building Lecture Hall from Mar 03 2016 03 30 PM to Mar 03 2016 04 30 PM Public Lecture National Gallery of Art Anthony Kaldellis Professor of Classics Ohio State University Read More Librarian Bookbinder Poet Patriot Ethel Burnet Clark Read More 75 Years Ago this Month The First Junior Fellows Arrive by James N Carder Feb 04 2016 10 42 AM Read More Tyler Fellow Update David Ungvary by Meredith Baber Feb 04 2016 11 14 AM Literary Identity in Latin Poetry Read More Dumbarton Oaks Seeks New Volunteers by Meredith Baber Feb 04 2016 11 14 AM Read More Wintersession at Dumbarton Oaks by Meredith Baber Feb 04 2016 11 14 AM Harvard Undergraduates Study Art and Power in Washington Read More From the Garden Blog by Meredith Baber Feb 04 2016 11 14 AM Read More Document Actions Print this Share Navigation News Events Hotels near Dumbarton Oaks Events Friends of Music Newsletter News Archives Blogs and Social Media Public Events Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection

    Original URL path: http://www.doaks.org/news-events/newsletter/newsletter/ (2016-02-18)
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  • William Makepeace Thackeray to Harriet Leslie, February 27, 1860 — Dumbarton Oaks
    sold 120 000 copies of its first issue Anthony Trollope wrote in his biography of Thackeray It will be well remembered still how much The Cornhill was talked about and thought of before it first appeared and how much of that thinking and talking was due to the fact that Mr Thackeray was to edit it In the first year contributors included Alfred Tennyson George Henry Lewes Leigh Hunt Elizabeth Gaskell Elizabeth Barrett Browning John Ruskin Anthony Trollope and even a posthumous fragment by Charlotte Brontë Thackeray wrote this letter to Harriet Leslie on Cornhill letterhead which must have been quite new at the time but he used his home address then 36 Onslow Square in South Kensington In the letter Thackeray seems to be referring to two articles The first which he proposed to Harriet Leslie was almost certainly a tribute to her late husband it ultimately ran in the April 1860 Cornhill under the title The Last Sketch It commemorated C R Leslie s artistic career in effusive terms the good the gentle the beloved Leslie while also setting the stage for a posthumous fragment of Charlotte Brontë s the story Emma which ran in the same issue This must have been delayed so that Thackeray could finish the urgently required article for the March Cornhill which seems to have been the second installment of his Roundabout Papers column a genially rambling essay in a manner that he himself identifies as Montaignesque It is unclear from content alone why it was so urgent to finish this piece The early issues of the Cornhill are available at the HathiTrust Digital Library The letter is accompanied in the Rare Book Collection by an unrelated drawing cut and mounted and titled presumably by the dealer New York Loafer Thackeray was as

    Original URL path: http://www.doaks.org/library-archives/rare-book-collection/autograph-letter-collection/william-makepeace-thackeray-to-harriet-leslie-february-27-1860 (2016-02-18)
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  • Claude Monet to Unknown Recipient, February 24, 1894 — Dumbarton Oaks
    from Cézanne you know that I admire him and that he has made some very beautiful things full of might and grandeur as for details about him his purpose his aspirations you ll find Renoir teaches you more directly because he has lived more in close quarters with him he was rather wary and barely tipped his cards at all Do you know Guillaumin he lived for a long time in the tightest friendship with Cézanne Look at him all the same he s an excellent boy who I am certain will give you all the details you want and who will also be happy to see him set in the limelight but see Renoir too as for seeing his works they are quite widely scattered A lot of them must have been lost Zola must have some in an attic M onsieu r Choquet had the most beautiful ones and a lot of them but I don t know how to go about seeing them no one could get past Madame Choquet s door after the death of her husband but since they both had a veritable cult for Cézanne maybe you would be welcomed willingly if you wrote what you want to do It would be worth the trouble to try a step deletion you could take me as your endorsement if you need to if you think it s called for As for the address you ll find it with Dubourg the gilder De Bellio and Caillebotte had it too and I think you could see them easily I ll be coming to Paris on Monday for the burial of our friend maybe I ll see you there but I have to come back the same night but since my wife will be coming too it s possible in order to tire ourselves out as little as possible that we ll arrive tomorrow night at the end of the line either around 10 o clock or for dinner I ll send it to you by telegram at La Justice In that case we could see each other if you re free or you could have dinner with us Friendship from your faithful Claude Monet I m not pulling myself away from my Cathedrals and am very discouraged I hesitate to expose myself Commentary We cannot know for certain who received this long chatty letter from Claude Monet he addresses it only to My dear friend and there is no envelope It is unclear whether this letter has been previously collected and published One strong candidate is Gustave Geffroy a friend of Monet s who was the art critic at the magazine La Justice Not long after the date of this letter on March 25 1894 Geffroy published an article praising Cézanne then still comparatively little known calling him Cézanne fantomatique Whoever the correspondent was he or she must have written to Monet to inquire about Cézanne occasioning this reply Monet had first moved to Giverny the famous

    Original URL path: http://www.doaks.org/library-archives/rare-book-collection/autograph-letter-collection/claude-monet-to-unknown-recipient-february-24-1894 (2016-02-18)
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  • Librarian, Bookbinder, Poet, Patriot: Ethel Burnet Clark — Dumbarton Oaks
    sometimes shocks me by flashing its light when I ought to be sad Clark was especially moved by the Blisses donation of Dumbarton Oaks to Harvard University She wrote about the gift All this time I have marveled saying It can t be possible No human being certainly not two could so consistently so unswervingly follow an ideal She compared the Blisses creation of the Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection to a road built with wisdom vision and will for pilgrims aspiring to reach the mountain top During her time working for the Blisses Clark contributed much to the growth of what came to be called the Founders Room collection Working with all forms of media including books manuscripts letters photographs and even 78 rpm vinyl records Clark was responsible for cataloging a significant portion of both the Blisses personal holdings and Mildred s garden library rare book collection Beyond cataloging she took responsibility for the acquisition of new rare books and miscellaneous other library matters As such she frequently interacted with book dealers collectors and authors to obtain new works She also dealt with what she called the exciting challenges relating to the functioning of the library Some of these challenges included rebinding library books devising and mounting bookplates and sensibly and efficiently organizing the location of books in the rooms at Dumbarton Oaks She assisted in the binding of 388 volumes during her time working in the house bindery from 1940 to 1942 In 1943 44 Clark supervised a volunteer group that assisted the Arts and Skills Corps of the American Red Cross This group took equipment and supplies to the Forest Glen Hospital an annex of the Walter Reed Hospital where they taught convalescing soldiers the art of bookbinding She was strongly affected by the Second World War and strove to serve the nation s war effort as best she could She attempted to qualify for the cipher and code division of the Office of Naval Intelligence In a letter to Mildred Clark revealed her diligence in preparing for the aptitude exam Often I reluctantly put away my pads and pencils at midnight and later jump out of bed because a possible solution has flashed across my brain Clark contributed her time and effort as well to several book sales organized to raise funds for American troops Acorn House converted from a kennel by G Chapman as a residence for Ethel Burnet Clark 1941 Having happily worked to catalog and build the libraries at Dumbarton Oaks Clark only surrendered her position because she had reached the age at which Harvard required retirement A year before Clark had commented on the sorrow of her predicament especially after learning that she had no chance of being an exception to the retirement age after several conversations with gentle and compassionate John Thacher the first Director of Dumbarton Oaks Nonetheless Clark was able to remain at Dumbarton Oaks after her official retirement under the title Keeper of Rare Books Emerita

    Original URL path: http://www.doaks.org/75th-anniversary/blog/librarian-bookbinder-poet-patriot-ethel-burnet-clark (2016-02-18)
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  • Dumbarton Oaks
    07 2013 Gary Urton Sep 05 2013 Sarah Underwood ICFA Interview Jul 20 2015 Sarah Underwood DOA Interview Oct 02 2014 File Vasiliev Memoir Autobiography Notes Oct 26 2015 FineGothicTapestries pdf Mar 20 2015 Goths in the Crimea Reviews Mar 10 2015 Alexander A Vasiliev Crimea Radio Talk Text Feb 02 2015 Albert Mathias Friend Jr Byzantine Studies at Dumbarton Oaks unpublished Read on April 26 1947 at the Dumbarton Oaks symposium on Byzantine Art and Scholarship Oct 07 2014 Folder French Company Correspondence and Related Documents Sep 11 2014 Blissiana Files and Artifacts Sep 11 2014 News Item 75 Years Ago this Month The First Junior Fellows Arrive Feb 02 2016 75 Years Ago this Month The New Dumbarton Oaks Bookplate Jan 14 2016 Dumbarton Oaks Celebrates Its 75th Anniversary Sep 21 2015 The Swimming Pool Jul 27 2015 Secretary General Ban Ki Moon s Visit to Dumbarton Oaks Jun 16 2015 Exhibit The Underworld Courier An Early Dumbarton Oaks Newsletter Jul 08 2013 The Bliss Album of Garden Photographs Oct 10 2014 Exhibit Item 301 AR LA GP 13 14 Oct 10 2014 305 AR LA GP 13 38 Oct 10 2014 302 AR LA GP xx 09 Oct 10 2014 292 AR LA GP 14 14 Oct 10 2014 291 AR LA GP 35 42 Oct 10 2014 Exhibit Section Service Court 273 283 Oct 10 2014 Service Entrance 272 Oct 10 2014 Wilderness 245 271 Oct 10 2014 Flower and Kitchen Gardens and Grape Arbor 230 233 Oct 10 2014 East Lawn and Terrior Column 202 209 Oct 10 2014 OLP Essay Fifty Years Later Apr 18 2013 Philip Johnson and Mildred Barnes Bliss Apr 18 2013 The Pre Columbian Pavilion as Postmodern Design Apr 18 2013 Critical Appraisal of the Philip Johnson Pavilion Apr 18

    Original URL path: http://www.doaks.org/author/jamesc (2016-02-18)
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