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  • Dumbarton Oaks
    jpg Sep 29 2015 Rapplectureimage jpg Sep 29 2015 StevensCatherwood jpg Sep 29 2015 News Item Tyler Fellow Update David Ungvary Feb 04 2016 From the Garden Blog Feb 04 2016 Dumbarton Oaks Seeks New Volunteers Feb 04 2016 Wintersession at Dumbarton Oaks Feb 04 2016 Behind the Scenes Jan 14 2016 OLP Annotation Dimitri de Gourko 1872 1945 Dec 09 2015 All content created by Meredith Baber Dumbarton Oaks

    Original URL path: http://www.doaks.org/author/meredithb (2016-02-18)
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  • Anniversary Blog — Dumbarton Oaks
    the Friends of Music commissions and performances of contemporary music Friends of Music Concert A Program of Music by Young American Composers February 7 1940 Read More Beatrix Jones Farrand Dumbarton Oaks Landscape Gardener Posted on Jan 28 2016 11 00 AM by Dumbarton Oaks Archives Permalink Filed under Garden Library Garden and Landscape Studies Beatrix Farrand Dumbarton Oaks Gardens Read comments None yet Beatrix Jones Farrand 1872 1959 was raised in the gilded splendor of New York s nineteenth century upper class Yet Farrand eventually decided to avoid what society and the pomp and polish of the era expected of her and instead to pursue her passion for garden design which had been kindled by childhood trips to Reef Point in Maine Her mother Mary Cadwalader Jones and her father the handsome Frederic Rhinelander Jones who came from a wealthy family and worked in manufacturing divorced in 1896 after years of estrangement The separation placed a long standing financial burden on her and her mother Fortunately they maintained their relationship with Farrand s paternal aunt the novelist Edith Wharton Wharton provided critically needed employment to Mary over the years as well as inspiration and encouragement to the young Farrand From 1893 to 1894 Farrand studied under Charles Sprague Sargent a professor of horticulture at Harvard University and founder of Harvard s Arnold Arboretum An outstanding student Farrand recognized that much of the knowledge she obtained during her time there had not been found in books With this in mind she toured Europe after completing her studies to gain additional insight into garden design To augment her limited finances Farrand sought work as a landscape gardener For a woman to pursue such a career was not entirely unheard of at the time however most found limited success in the field Initially depending on sponsorship and commissions from wealthy family friends Farrand soon became renowned and expanded her clientele In 1899 she became the only female founding member of the American Society of Landscape Architects Beatrix Farrand in Maine at her Reef Point library In 1921 Farrand first met with Mildred Bliss who needed a landscape gardener to oversee the development of the gardens at the newly acquired Dumbarton Oaks With overlapping social circles and similar backgrounds Farrand and Bliss immediately took a liking to each other and became close enough in the course of their relationship to consider themselves gardening twins Though certainly not Farrand s only clients Mildred and Robert Woods Bliss would become her close friends and her work at Dumbarton Oaks would become one of her longest and most rewarding projects earning her international recognition When Robert was appointed U S Minister to Sweden in 1923 the Blisses moved to Europe leaving Farrand alone for much of the garden design process Corresponding frequently with Mildred Farrand continued her work overseeing everything from the grandest conceptual schematics to the smallest aesthetic decisions Inspired by classical Roman ideas about the purpose of gardens Farrand and Mildred together designed many of the gardens to serve as extensions of the home living space Accordingly Farrand constructed enclosed garden areas for both pleasure and entertaining allocating space in the garden plans for facilities such as a swimming pool a tennis court and an outdoor theater Beatrix Farrand correspondence to Mildred Bliss August 14 1950 After the Blisses gave Dumbarton Oaks to Harvard University in 1940 the purpose and use of the estate changed dramatically Farrand was now charged with adapting the gardens to suit institutional and public needs At the request of John S Thacher the first Director of Dumbarton Oaks Farrand began work on her Plant Book in 1941 It was hoped that with the Plant Book as a directive proper steps could be taken by the institution and future landscape architects to preserve the original artistic spirit of the garden when Farrand s involvement came to an end This private manual was published in 1980 and the work reveals a deep connection between Farrand and her landscape creation as evidenced in numerous references to individual plants and specific outlines for their care Approaching her seventies after nearly twenty years of work at Dumbarton Oaks Farrand began to distance herself from the active refashioning of the gardens Ruth Havey a longtime member of Farrand s staff who was familiar with Dumbarton Oaks began to work with Mildred on new projects By 1947 even Farrand s advisory position for the gardens had become too much for her and she instead devoted her time to helping Mildred assemble a garden library of rare books for Dumbarton Oaks By the early 1950s the library had more than tripled in size and the Blisses donated it to Dumbarton Oaks In 1951 they created the Garden Endowment Fund which partly was to be used for the maintenance and enlargement of the Garden Research Library already established at Dumbarton Oaks Read more about the Garden Endowment Fund in posts about the Garden Library Rare Book Collection and the evolution of the Garden and Landscape Studies program In 1950 Farrand gave Dumbarton Oaks her archive of drawings photographs and letters that related to the creation of the gardens She felt that this collection was of real value as few places have so long a carefully kept record of attempts accomplishments and failures For the art of landscape these records are worthwhile and they should be kept safely catalogued and protected She advised Thacher It is rare that a continuous history of a place covering more than 20 years is to be found Therefore the papers have considerable professional value You will of course want to make this material available and useful to students of Landscape Architecture After thirty years of involvement with Dumbarton Oaks Farrand retired in 1951 She remained in close contact with the Blisses until her death in 1959 Grieving the loss of a dear friend as well as a creative collaborator Mildred paid tribute to Farrand in a publication that she edited in 1960 Beatrix Jones Farrand 1872 1959 An Appreciation of a Great Landscape Gardener Read More The Collection Goes Underground Posted on Jan 25 2016 11 00 AM by Dumbarton Oaks Archives Permalink Filed under The First Decade of Dumbarton Oaks Dumbarton Oaks at War Collection Read comments None yet The Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection opened a little more than a year after the outbreak of the Second World War Indeed its founder Robert Woods Bliss later recounted that the war s beginning and the opening of the institution were more than coincidental As the depression increased and Nazism gained control of Germany we knew war was a certainty and that inevitably this country would be sucked into the cataclysm So we faced the future squarely and decided to transfer Dumbarton Oaks to the University in 1940 To ease the wrench we assured each other that freedom of choice is a privilege not often granted by Fate and that to give up our home at our own time to assure the long range realization of our plan was the way of wisdom Mildred Bliss right in her American Women s Voluntary Services uniform with an unidentified woman 1943 At first the war seemed to have little impact on the embryonic institution However with the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor on December 7 1941 and America s entry into the conflict Dumbarton Oaks quickly shifted from the academic to the pragmatic Dumbarton Oaks in effect reacted to and then joined the war effort the collection was quickly packed and sent to various distant locations for safekeeping until the end of the war in 1945 use of the property was offered to relief organizations and then to the Departments of War and State first to expedite the war effort and then to facilitate the establishment of world peace a victory garden was maintained and Dumbarton Oaks Fellows provided the War Department with lists of potentially endangered sites monuments and artworks in Hungary Bulgaria Germany Greece Yugoslavia Romania and Tunisia in order to help insure their protection These activities notwithstanding throughout the war years the Blisses also continued to collect art in order to further improve the Byzantine collection that they had given to Harvard University On December 7 1941 the Dumbarton Oaks staff began to pack the Collection s artworks and antiquities in order to store them at various locations across the country including a basement vault that was constructed at Dumbarton Oaks Some objects went to other museum storerooms and the most precious objects were deposited in the vault of the City Bank Farmers Trust Company in New York City Having seen wartime destruction firsthand while living in France during the First World War the Blisses asked Dumbarton Oaks to make this preemptive move to protect artworks in case there was a military attack on Washington Mildred Bliss was particularly anxious On January 16 1942 she wrote to Director John Thacher I hope you are getting on with the protection of the vault in the new building for I have a feeling that the raiding season will come sooner than expected She continued It is also of vital importance to the future of Dumbarton Oaks and consequently to that of the University itself that nothing harmful to the best interests of the plant life should be done unless the war makes it necessary by making their continued care impossible But nothing short of impossible would justify it to us After the establishment of peace in 1945 120 Dumbarton Oaks artworks that had been stored at Harvard s Fogg Art Museum were shown there between November 15 and December 31 in an exhibition titled A Selection of Ivories Bronzes Metalwork and Other Objects from the Dumbarton Oaks Collection Upon their return to Dumbarton Oaks the Collection was reinstalled and opened once again to the public in the fall of 1946 Read More Pre Columbian Studies From Collection to Research Program Posted on Jan 21 2016 11 00 AM by Dumbarton Oaks Archives Permalink Filed under Scholars of Dumbarton Oaks Pre Columbian Collection Pre Columbian Studies Collection Fellows Pre Columbian Pavilion Read comments None yet Although Pre Columbian Studies at Dumbarton Oaks can be dated to 1963 it matured somewhat slowly as a program and became full fledged only in 1970 with the appointment of its first Fellow Arthur Miller In December of 1963 curator Elizabeth P Benson and Director John S Thacher opened the Robert Woods Bliss Collection of Pre Columbian Art The collection formerly exhibited at the National Gallery of Art was beautifully installed in a glass walled pavilion designed by the architect Philip Johnson In addition to the art collection Robert Bliss had also given Dumbarton Oaks 2 400 books on Pre Columbian art history anthropology and archaeology and this library would provide the basis for the research program In 1964 soon after the collection opened Dumbarton Oaks appointed a Pre Columbian Advisory Committee Initially tasked with making recommendations on acquisitions for the collection the Committee soon also came to advise on lecturers and conferences as well as on publications resulting from these events Central to this early period in the development of the Pre Columbian Studies program at Dumbarton Oaks was Michael D Coe professor of anthropology at Yale and a noted Mayanist In 1963 Coe authored the Handbook of the Robert Woods Bliss Collection of Pre Columbian Art and in 1964 he was appointed Advisor for Pre Columbian Art at Dumbarton Oaks a position he would hold through 1979 Coe also gave the first Pre Columbian public lecture at Dumbarton Oaks On February 7 1964 he delivered a paper The Beginning of Mesoamerican Civilization which would be the basis for a 1966 Dumbarton Oaks publication An Early Stone Pectoral from Southeastern Mexico This would be the first of a now 37 volume series of occasional papers in a series published by Dumbarton Oaks titled Dumbarton Oaks Pre Columbian Art and Archaeology Studies Michael D Coe b 1929 Robert Bliss s first exotic cultural other acquisition diopside jadeite standing figure Olmec 900 300 BCE PC B 014 Pre Columbian Collection Dumbarton Oaks Museum Michael Coe also led the first Pre Columbian symposium then called a conference in 1967 Titled the Dumbarton Oaks Conference on the Olmec the papers would be published by Dumbarton Oaks the following year in a volume edited by Elizabeth Benson The Olmec civilization was of particular significance to Dumbarton Oaks as one of the first pieces of Pre Columbian art that Robert Bliss had acquired in 1912 was an Olmec jadeite carving although at the time of its purchase it was not yet recognized as being Olmec in origin In addition scholarly understanding of the antiquity of the Olmec culture had recently profited from the advent of carbon 14 dating technology which helped to date the Olmec civilization to early within Pre Columbian history ca 1500 300 BC After the death of Mildred Bliss in 1969 and the appointment of a new Director William Royall Tyler who served from 1969 to 1977 Pre Columbian Studies at Dumbarton Oaks began to quickly evolve into a research program that was parallel if smaller in scale to the Byzantine Studies program The Garden and Landscape Studies program then called Studies in Garden and Landscape Architecture underwent a similar transformation at that time In 1970 the Robert Woods Bliss Fellowship in Pre Columbian Studies was created and the first fellowship was awarded to Arthur G Miller Miller worked for two years on a catalogue of the Teotihuacán mural fragments in Mexico work that Dumbarton Oaks published as The Mural Painting of Teotihuacán in 1973 In 1971 the number of Bliss Fellow appointments in Pre Columbian Studies was increased to two with the appointment of the first doctoral candidate Junior Fellow S Jeffrey K Wilkerson In 1973 the program invited its first Visiting Scholar Floyd G Lounsbury Summer Fellowship appointments were first made in 1980 Informal gathering of the Pre Columbian Studies program and others in the Dumbarton Oaks Refectory The Pre Columbian Studies program evolved in other ways as well Although the program was initially grounded in the collection and the early publications and lectures were focused on Pre Columbian art history the research program quickly grew to be more inclusive of the varied disciplines that make up Pre Columbian studies Pre Columbian history anthropology ethnography and especially archaeology became important components of the studies program This was due in large part to the next program director and curator Elizabeth Hill Boone and the noted archaeologist Gordon R Willey who had served on the Board of Advisors since 1963 and would transition to the board of Senior Fellows in the 1970s He was an influential chair of the Senior Fellows for over a decade between 1973 and 1986 During this period the Pre Columbian library also grew exponentially under the stewardship of librarian Bridget Gazzo and transitioned from a specialized art library to a world class comprehensive collection Since 1963 the Pre Columbian library has since grown to more than 33 000 volumes In his oral history interview former Director of Pre Columbian Studies Jeffrey Quilter emphasized the unique significance of the Dumbarton Oaks Pre Columbian Studies program Pre Columbian studies as a field or a discipline or area realm arena of discussion or interaction really only exists at Dumbarton Oaks So by the very framing of the discourse as Pre Columbian Studies Dumbarton Oaks created a place and a space where art historians and field archaeologists and whose who work in the early colonial period on documents and those who work in remote antiquity can all not always all at the same time but over the long haul over years have a place to meet exchange views and interact in ways that they often don t get to do or at least get to do as easily elsewhere Jeffrey Quilter and Juan Antonio Murro in the Pre Columbian Collection Read More A Poem for Dumbarton Oaks during Wartime Posted on Jan 18 2016 11 00 AM by Dumbarton Oaks Archives Permalink Filed under Dumbarton Oaks at War Read comments None yet This poem was published in the Washington D C newspaper the Evening Star on September 21 1942 Dumbarton Oaks Anna M Priestley 1883 1967 Could Eden have been lovelier than this A woman asked who wandered at my side Through these vast grounds that once were one man s pride Whose home was in this stately edifice This is an Eden with no serpent s hiss No flaming sword by which men are denied Entrance through gates hospitably set wide That art and nature s union none may miss We may not lose our faith in humankind While through the generosity of men Such beauty spots as this invite the soul The world will not continue to be blind The flowers of hope and love will bloom again When a torn earth has once more been made whole Read More Hans Peter L Orange Remembers His Year at Dumbarton Oaks 1950 Posted on Jan 14 2016 11 00 AM by Dumbarton Oaks Archives Permalink Filed under Scholars of Dumbarton Oaks Byzantine Studies Life at Dumbarton Oaks In Their Own Words Visiting scholar Read comments None yet Hans Peter L Orange 1903 1983 an art historian and classical archaeologist was a Visiting Scholar in the Byzantine Studies program at Dumbarton Oaks in 1949 50 and he participated in the 1950 symposium The Emperor and the Palace After his return to Oslo he wrote the Blisses on July 5 1950 reminiscing on his year at Dumbarton Oaks An excerpt from that letter follows Some part of my person is still staying with the friends and colleagues at the Dumbarton Oaks working in the library and meditating in the gardens and will not in spite of my energetic efforts acquiesce to the forms and principles of pre Dumbartian life The energies of this part of my person would naturally manifest themselves in some written records from the Dumbarton Oaks its library collections and gardens and first of all its scholarly life I would prepare these records for some Scandinavian reviews and newspapers but cannot begin before having the photographs from the Dumbarton Oaks which I am eagerly waiting for At the Dumbarton Oaks it impressed me very much to see how in a circle of specialized scholars who are supplementing each other the true reality of knowledge which was the fortune of earlier generations and modern specialized research has lost in some way is reestablished This was perhaps my greatest experience in that beautiful American Platonopolis of Washington which was more successful than that of Plotianus in Campania 17 centuries ago When I recall this experience and my whole stay at the Dumbarton Oaks not only as a place of study and scholarship but also of art and beauty and last but not least of what I think is true American friendliness I am full of thankfulness to the country the institution and persons who offered it to me My special thank is then addressed to you Mr and Mrs Woods Bliss also for all your kindness to me in your house in Washington Speakers at the 1950 Byzantine Studies Symposium left to right Andreas Alföldi Francis Dvornik Albert Mathias Friend Jr Hans Peter L Orange Ernst Kantorowicz Paul Underwood André Grabar seated Read More Librarian Bookbinder Poet Patriot Ethel Burnet Clark Posted on Jan 11 2016 11 00 AM by Dumbarton Oaks Archives Permalink Filed under Rare Book Collection Garden Library Underworld Courier Dumbarton Oaks Research Library The First Decade of Dumbarton Oaks Oaks News Acorn House February 2016 Dumbarton Oaks at War Read comments None yet A devoted bibliophile and longtime friend of the Blisses Ethel Burnet Clark helped Mildred Barnes Bliss catalog the Blisses personal library before the transfer of Dumbarton Oaks to Harvard University in 1940 After the transfer she served as Keeper of Rare Books from 1940 until 1944 when she reached mandatory retirement age Highly knowledgeable about the rare holdings of Dumbarton Oaks Clark published occasional essays on the collection such as Chronicles of Froissart at Dumbarton Oaks in 1947 Particularly close to Mildred Clark wrote to her frequently and enthusiastically often compiling extensive accounts of events at Dumbarton Oaks While the Blisses were in California after they transferred Dumbarton Oaks to Harvard in 1940 Clark helped to generate the Underworld Courier a short and sometimes tongue in cheek summary of events taking place at Dumbarton Oaks see post Mildred commented encouragingly on both the versatile informativeness and feather pated folly that characterized the publication In a letter written to Mildred Clark expressed how fond she had become of writing for the publication noting that after it ceased she had been lonely without it as her heart had been kept warm and young as a result of the pleasant exercise of weaving pieces for it Mildred Robert Woods Bliss in the Dumbarton Oaks Founders Room with the Rare Book Collection March 2 1956 Sunday Star Clark was also fond of creative writing and she frequently wrote short segments of poetic prose to Mildred An excerpt from one such work reads Life has bestowed many gifts upon me Health with its companion resiliency delight in the sky the earth and the sea unaccountable joy in life itself that surprises and sometimes shocks me by flashing its light when I ought to be sad Clark was especially moved by the Blisses donation of Dumbarton Oaks to Harvard University She wrote about the gift All this time I have marveled saying It can t be possible No human being certainly not two could so consistently so unswervingly follow an ideal She compared the Blisses creation of the Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection to a road built with wisdom vision and will for pilgrims aspiring to reach the mountain top During her time working for the Blisses Clark contributed much to the growth of what came to be called the Founders Room collection Working with all forms of media including books manuscripts letters photographs and even 78 rpm vinyl records Clark was responsible for cataloging a significant portion of both the Blisses personal holdings and Mildred s garden library rare book collection Beyond cataloging she took responsibility for the acquisition of new rare books and miscellaneous other library matters As such she frequently interacted with book dealers collectors and authors to obtain new works She also dealt with what she called the exciting challenges relating to the functioning of the library Some of these challenges included rebinding library books devising and mounting bookplates and sensibly and efficiently organizing the location of books in the rooms at Dumbarton Oaks She assisted in the binding of 388 volumes during her time working in the house bindery from 1940 to 1942 In 1943 44 Clark supervised a volunteer group that assisted the Arts and Skills Corps of the American Red Cross This group took equipment and supplies to the Forest Glen Hospital an annex of the Walter Reed Hospital where they taught convalescing soldiers the art of bookbinding She was strongly affected by the Second World War and strove to serve the nation s war effort as best she could She attempted to qualify for the cipher and code division of the Office of Naval Intelligence In a letter to Mildred Clark revealed her diligence in preparing for the aptitude exam Often I reluctantly put away my pads and pencils at midnight and later jump out of bed because a possible solution has flashed across my brain Clark contributed her time and effort as well to several book sales organized to raise funds for American troops Acorn House converted from a kennel by G Chapman as a residence for Ethel Burnet Clark 1941 Having happily worked to catalog and build the libraries at Dumbarton Oaks Clark only surrendered her position because she had reached the age at which Harvard required retirement A year before Clark had commented on the sorrow of her predicament especially after learning that she had no chance of being an exception to the retirement age after several conversations with gentle and compassionate John Thacher the first Director of Dumbarton Oaks Nonetheless Clark was able to remain at Dumbarton Oaks after her official retirement under the title Keeper of Rare Books Emerita In this capacity Clark continued her work at Dumbarton Oaks and received a small monthly pension in addition to living quarters at the Acorn House a small cottage on the Dumbarton Oaks property Later in the 1960s she also helped catalog the Mary Mellon collection of books and manuscripts on alchemy and the occult which Paul Mellon then gave to Yale University Robert Woods Bliss remembered Clark s service and friendship She was the doyenne of our staff and bore the strain and inconvenience of bringing order out of our personal Library as well as in organizing a Bindery rebuilding the Quarters and making catalogues at the same time For this and much besides the unfailing charm she brings to all her relationships and duties we thank her warmly Particularly fond of the Acorn House which had originally served as a kennel for the Blisses guard dog Doberman Pinchers Clark wrote about her new home lovingly in correspondence with Mildred describing her fundamental happiness and content in being allowed to reside in the small house and even admitting that she had not dared to put her delight into words for fear that she would suddenly wake up Mildred expressed her equal thrill at having Clark on the estate writing I long to cross your threshold and to have you think aloud to me as we sit on the little terrace sipping lemonade Read More Then and Now Midday Meals at Dumbarton Oaks Posted on Jan 07 2016 11 00 AM by Dumbarton Oaks Archives Permalink Filed under Life at Dumbarton Oaks Fellows Read comments None yet Midday mealtimes have always played an important role in the culture of Dumbarton Oaks providing an opportunity for Fellows and staff to both socialize and strengthen interdepartmental bonds For over sixty years midday dining took place in the Fellows Building now the Guest House see post until the Refectory was opened in the fall of 2006 occupying a space that had once been the Director s house Dining however did not always include the entire institution Prior to the directorship of Giles Constable from 1977 to 1984 see post only the faculty and the Fellows dined together the general staff were excluded Constable in an effort to democratize Dumbarton Oaks both opened up the midday meal to all staff and Fellows and switched the dining style from a formal served affair to buffet style allowing diners to come at their convenience and sit where they wanted Constable remembered this change in his oral history interview Of course when I went there the memory of Mrs Bliss serving tea and Sirarpie Der Nersessian presiding at the lunch table and ringing the bell for the servants to come in was still there And there was this rather strong and not altogether bad sense of being one large family with a number of family retainers But that is not the basis upon which a serious scholarly institution can run And on the straight forward level one of my first initiatives was to open up the Fellows Building But even so the feelings of resentment were so great that some of the staff would never come to lunch Above all Irene Vaslef who is my dear friend still is she absolutely refused to come to lunch because she had so bitterly resented being kept out for so many years And I absolutely sympathized with that Today Fellows and the Dumbarton Oaks staff continue to enjoy the midday dining tradition at Dumbarton Oaks in the Refectory sharing in Chef Hector Paz s delicious and eclectic preparations Following are some images of the midday meal at Dumbarton Oaks Fellows Building dining room 1953 Lunch in the Fellows Building 1962 Lunch in the Fellows Building ca 1977 1978 Midday meal in the Refectory Summer 2015 Lunch in the Refectory prepared by Chef Hector Paz August 2015 The Refectory s coffee and dessert room The Dumbarton Oaks Refectory formerly the Blisses male staff quarters and later the Director s House Read More In Memoriam Gifts to the Dumbarton Oaks Collection Posted on Jan 04 2016 11 00 AM by Dumbarton Oaks Archives Permalink Filed under Pre Columbian Collection Byzantine Collection Collection Read comments None yet The Dumbarton Oaks Collection has received a number of remarkable objects that were given to the museum in someone s memory Since the giver typically wished to commemorate someone who had recently died these gifts were doubly meaningful they both enriched the collection and kept alive the memory of the deceased associating the person with an object of beauty and importance Frequently the gifts that came to Dumbarton Oaks were offered in memory of a spouse or family member Robert Woods Bliss was also honored in this way After his death in 1962 many friends and dealers gave Pre Columbian artworks in his memory for the Pre Columbian Collection that was about to open to the public see post The dealer John Wise for example gave a unique incised Moche stone box PC B 536 in Bliss s memory and this object is the only known complete Moche stone box of its kind in existence Hayford Peirce an amateur Byzantine scholar and collector was a close friend of the Blisses and a collaborator with the Blisses friend Royall Tyler Peirce died on March 4 1946 and in his memory in 1947 his widow Polly Peirce gave Dumbarton Oaks a Byzantine micromosaic icon which the Blisses had been interested to acquire in 1931 but had not pursued due to its price At the time of the gift Polly Peirce also lent Dumbarton Oaks other objects from Peirce s collection including his 5 000 piece Byzantine coin collection In 1948 the Blisses would fund the acquisition of the coins and in 1963 Mildred Bliss would fund the acquisition of the objects a rock crystal ring and a red porphyry head On December 18 1947 Robert Bliss wrote Royall Tyler We have seen the Peirce miniature mosaic which is a wonder I am about to write Polly to tell her how grateful and pleased we are to have at Dumbarton Oaks such an object as a memorial to Hayford She has left at Dumbarton Oaks as a loan the rock crystal ring and a red porphyry head both of which are very fine In addition she has deposited at Dumbarton Oaks also on loan that part of the collection of coins which was in America with the assurance that those coming from Europe will be added upon arrival I have not seen the coins yet but Jack Thacher says they are very fine Miniature Mosaic Icon with Forty Martyrs of Sebasteia gift of Polly Peirce in memory of her husband Hayford Peirce 1947 BZ 1947 24 Byzantine Chalice gift of Elisina and William R Tyler in memory of Royall Tyler 1955 BZ 1955 18 Royall Tyler himself died on February 3 1953 His wife Elisina Tyler and the Tylers son William Royall Tyler who was Mildred Bliss s godson and who would be the second Director of Dumbarton Oaks gave Dumbarton Oaks an early Byzantine silver chalice BZ 1955 18 in his memory Royall Tyler had acquired this chalice in 1913 as one of his first Byzantine purchases see here for letters in the Bliss Tyler Correspondence that mention the chalice This gift was particularly poignant to the Blisses as the chalice was from the same hoard as their silver paten BZ 1924 5 and liturgical fan BZ 1936 23 and the Blisses and the Tylers often referred to these pieces as their family When Royall Tyler first alerted the Blisses to the paten in a letter of January 26 1924 he noted It is perhaps the most moving thing possibly excepting my chalice I ve ever seen for sale If you do get it live with it for a good long time anyway It will teach you a great deal about the age when Santa Sophia and the great churches of Ravenna were built when the most perfect Byzantine enamels were made and the throne of Maximian was carved Eventually give it to the Cabinet des Médailles the only place in the world I know of that s fit to receive it You may imagine how excited I am The thought of your having it intoxicates me and it would be a happiness for life to think that the two pieces would one day be joined together and live happily ever after at the Cabinet des Médailles Byzantine amethyst gem depicting Christ gift of Mildred and Robert Woods Bliss in memory of Royall Tyler 1953 BZ 1953 7 Maya panel from Palenque gift to Dumbarton Oaks from Mildred Bliss in memory of her husband Robert Woods Bliss 1963 PC B 528 The Blisses themselves made a gift to Dumbarton Oaks in memory of Royall Tyler a sixth seventh century carved amethyst gem with a standing figure of Christ Tyler had discovered the intaglio gem at the Parisian dealer Charles Ratton and had recommended it to then Director John Thacher on April 16 1952 The Blisses presented the gem to Dumbarton Oaks almost exactly a year later on April 14 1953 which was also their forty fifth wedding anniversary Between 1958 and his death on April 19 1962 Robert Woods Bliss was engaged in the construction of the Philip Johnson designed pavilion for his Pre Columbian Collection see post Unfortunately he would not live to see the building s completion or the installation of the collection Mildred Bliss took over that responsibility opening the collection in December 1963 In memory of her husband Mildred Bliss gave Dumbarton Oaks a large limestone Maya panel from Palenque PC B 528 Others also remembered Robert Bliss with gifts to the Pre Columbian Collection Director John Thacher gave a Maya polychrome ceramic PC B 563 Maya polychrome ceramic gift of John S Thacher in memory of Robert Woods Bliss 1968 PC B 563 Floor Panel gift of Ernest Brummer and Mrs Joseph Brummer in memory of Joseph Brummer 1949 BZ 1949 2 Other gifts made in memoriam to the Dumbarton Oaks Collection include a Cosmati floor panel BZ 1949 2 given in 1949 by Ernest Brummer and Mrs Joseph Brummer in memory of the dealer Joseph Brummer who had died on April 14 1947 The Blisses and Dumbarton Oaks had acquired some 160 Byzantine objects from the Brummers In 1951 Victoria Tytus Steward who was Mildred Bliss s goddaughter gave the Byzantine Collection a silver dish BZ 1951 31 in memory of her father the archaeologist and collector Robb de Peyster Tytus 1876 1913 Director John Thacher gave the Byzantine Collection a gold and cloisonné enamel closure with representations of Christ and Mary BZ 1965 4 in memory of his mother Frances Lake Thacher who had died in January 1962 And in 1969 the numismatist Alfred Bellinger who had authored volumes on the Byzantine coin collection gave the Byzantine Collection three Byzantine textile fragments BZ 1969 61a c in memory of his sister the textile specialist Louisa Bellinger who died in November 1968 In the early years of Dumbarton Oaks Louisa Bellinger had worked on the Byzantine Textile Census see post Read More Wilhelm Koehler The Dumbarton Oaks Program and the Principle of Collaborative Research Posted on Dec 31 2015 11 00 AM by Dumbarton Oaks Archives Permalink Filed under Scholars of Dumbarton Oaks In Their Own Words Byzantine Studies Fellows Read comments None yet Wilhelm Koehler a professor of medieval art history at Harvard University came to Dumbarton Oaks in 1941 as Senior Research Fellow in Charge of Research

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  • The Birthing Figure in the Robert Woods Bliss Collection of Pre-Columbian Art — Dumbarton Oaks
    with inspiring the gold figure that Indiana Jones pursues in the 1981 film Raiders of the Lost Ark It is also the inspiration for Mexican artist Frida Kahlo s painting Childbirth For over fifty years this sculpture was considered to be Late Postclassic Aztec ca 900 1521 and to represent Tlazolteotl an Aztec deity associated with both supplying a person with sin and in turn removing it The gender neutral name Tlazolteotl means filth deity In addition to being a patroness of childbirth Tlazolteotl was fused with many Aztec goddesses including Ixcuina the goddess of spinning weaving and fertility who in another case of identity fusion simultaneously embodied four sisters Having generated so much attention over the years the sculpture has also produced its critics Many of the characteristics that made the sculpture popular to modern audiences such as the impassioned face of the figure in the midst of the agony of childbirth the nudity of the figure and the highly polished finish are the very qualities that skeptics point out as evidence that the work is a forgery Such critics assert that the work appeals too strongly to contemporary tastes suggesting that it was crafted as late as the nineteenth century in the Aztec style Moreover the carving technique used to fashion the sculpture appears through microscopic analysis to be decidedly Post Columbian rather than Pre Columbian Despite the controversy this sculpture remains a public favorite As such it has acquired a modern cultural identity that transcends the issues of origin and genuineness For many the sculpture has a powerful hold on the human imagination and has become an icon of the power and pain of childbirth This notwithstanding as a museum object at a research institute it also stands as an icon of the ever changing perceptions and

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  • Ernest Brummer (1891–1964) — Dumbarton Oaks
    December 12 1926 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss December 14 1926 Mildred Barnes and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler December 17 1926 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler December 18 1926 Elisina Tyler to Mildred Barnes and Robert Woods Bliss December 21 1926 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes and Robert Woods Bliss December 25 1926 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss December 29 1926 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes and Robert Woods Bliss January 7 1927 1 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss January 7 1927 2 Elisina Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss January 7 1927 3 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss January 13 1927 Mildred Barnes and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler January 17 1927 Elisina Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss January 25 1927 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler January 31 1927 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss February 6 1927 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss February 21 1927 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss March 1 1927 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss March 9 1927 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss May 3 1927 Elisina Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss May 4 1927 Elisina Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss May 7 1927 Elisina Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss May 19 1927 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss July 17 1927 Elisina Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss July 29 1927 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss September 25 1927 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss October 24 1927 1 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss October 24 1927 2 Elisina Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss November 20 1927 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler December 3 1927 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss December 31 1927 Argentina Budapest and Paris 1928 1933 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss January 5 1928 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss January 8 1928 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler January 28 1928 Mildred Barnes Bliss to Royall Tyler January 31 1928 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss February 1 1928 1 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss February 1 1928 2 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss February 11 1928 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss February 17 1928 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss March 13 1928 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler April 9 1928 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss April 29 1928 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss May 10 1928 Elisina Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss May 29 1928 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss May 30 1928 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss June 6 1928 1 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss June 6 1928 2 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss June 26 1928 Elisina Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss July 30 1928 1 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss July 30 1928 2 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Elisina Tyler July 31 1928 Elisina Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss August 4 1928 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss August 7 1928 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss August 11 1928 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss September 6 1928 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler September 12 1928 1 Mildred Barnes Bliss to Royall Tyler September 12 1928 2 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss September 16 1928 1 Elisina Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss September 16 1928 2 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler October 6 1928 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss November 3 1928 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss November 8 1928 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss December 8 1928 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss December 16 1928 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss December 18 1928 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss January 30 1929 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss February 5 1929 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss February 9 1929 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss February 12 1929 1 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss February 12 1929 2 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler February 16 1929 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss February 28 1929 1 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss February 28 1929 2 Mildred Barnes Bliss to Royall Tyler March 11 1929 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss March 27 1929 Elisina Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss March 29 1929 1 Mildred Barnes Bliss to Royall Tyler March 29 1929 2 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss April 11 1929 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss April 12 1929 Elisina Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss April 19 1929 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss May 8 1929 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss May 9 1929 Elisina Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss May 19 1929 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss May 29 1929 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss June 17 1929 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss July 17 1929 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss July 24 1929 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss August 11 1929 Elisina Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss August 13 1929 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss August 22 1929 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss September 18 1929 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss September 28 1929 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss October 12 1929 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss October 13 1929 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss October 23 1929 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss November 8 1929 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss November 13 1929 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler December 14 1929 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss December 15 1929 1 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler December 15 1929 2 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss December 17 1929 1 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler December 17 1929 2 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss December 18 1929 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss December 26 1929 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss December 28 1929 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss December 30 1929 Mildred Barnes Bliss to Royall Tyler January 6 1930 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss January 26 1930 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss February 10 1930 Ellis Russell for Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss February 11 1930 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler February 23 1930 Mildred Barnes Bliss to Royall Tyler March 1 1930 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss March 6 1930 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss March 25 1930 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss March 27 1930 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Unknown Recipient undated 6 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler Postmarked April 7 1930 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss April 21 1930 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss April 25 1930 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler April 27 1930 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss April 28 1930 1 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss April 28 1930 2 Elisina Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss May 1 1930 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss May 3 1930 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler May 6 1930 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss May 16 1930 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss May 26 1930 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss June 13 1930 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss June 19 1930 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler June 20 1930 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss June 21 1930 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler June 23 1930 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss June 29 1930 Elisina Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss July 1 1930 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss August 9 1930 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss August 15 1930 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss August 25 1930 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler September 23 1930 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss September 25 1930 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler September 27 1930 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss September 28 1930 1 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler September 28 1930 2 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss September 29 1930 1 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Unknown Recipient September 29 1930 2 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler September 29 1930 3 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss September 29 1930 4 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss October 2 1930 Mildred Barnes Bliss to Royall Tyler October 3 1930 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss October 4 1930 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss October 14 1930 Mildred Barnes Bliss to Royall Tyler October 20 1930 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss October 21 1930 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss October 25 1930 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss October 31 1930 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler November 1 1930 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss November 3 1930 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss November 13 1930 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler November 22 1930 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss November 28 1930 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss December 6 1930 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss December 13 1930 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler January 6 1931 1 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss January 6 1931 2 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss January 19 1931 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler January 27 1931 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss February 3 1931 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss February 5 1931 William Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss February 6 1931 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler February 13 1931 Mildred Barnes Bliss to Royall Tyler February 14 1931 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss March 1 1931 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler March 2 1931 Mildred Barnes Bliss to Royall Tyler March 4 1931 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss March 7 1931 1 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss March 7 1931 2 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss March 14 1931 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss March 17 1931 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss March 27 1931 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss March 30 1931 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss April 11 1931 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss April 12 1931 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss April 13 1931 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss April 20 1931 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss April 23 1931 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss April 30 1931 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler May 1 1931 1 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss May 1 1931 2 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss May 7 1931 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss May 9 1931 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler May 19 1931 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss May 21 1931 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss May 23 1931 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler May 25 1931 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss May 28 1931 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler June 8 1931 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss June 10 1931 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss June 17 1931 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler June 18 1931 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss June 24 1931 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss July 8 1931 1 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler July 8 1931 2 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss July 10 1931 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss July 11 1931 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler July 13 1931 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss July 14 1931 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss July 16 1931 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss July 18 1931 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss July 20 1931 1 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss July 20 1931 2 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss July 26 1931 1 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss July 26 1931 2 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss August 12 1931 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss August 17 1931 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss August 31 1931 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss September 26 1931 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler October 3 1931 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler October 26 1931 Mildred Barnes Bliss to Royall Tyler November 11 1931 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss January 8 1932 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss January 29 1932 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss February 15 1932 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler March 4 1932 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss March 7 1932 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss March 15 1932 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss March 16 1932 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss March 17 1932 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss March 31 1932 Thérèse Malye for Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler May 7 1932 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss May 11 1932 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss May 15 1932 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss May 17 1932 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss June 3 1932 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss June 10 1932 Mildred Barnes Bliss to Royall Tyler July 26 1932 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss August 15 1932 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss October 1 1932 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss October 26 1932 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss November 1 1932 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss December 10 1932 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss December 21 1932 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss January 17 1933 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss February 7 1933 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss February 10 1933 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss February 11 1933 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss February 13 1933 Elisina Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss February 15 1933 1 Elisina Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss February 15 1933 2 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler March 2 1933 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss March 13 1933 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler undated 7 Mildred Barnes Bliss to Royall Tyler March 25 1933 1 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss March 25 1933 2 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler March 27 1933 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss March 28 1933 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss April 25 1933 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss April 30 1933 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss May 2 1933 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss May 24 1933 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss June 6 1933 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss June 12 1933 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss June 15 1933 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss June 18 1933 Elisina Tyler Royall Tyler William Royall Tyler Hayford Peirce and Robert Woods Bliss to Mildred Barnes Bliss August 21 1933 1 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss August 21 1933 2 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss August 28 1933 Elisina Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss August 31 1933 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss September 15 1933 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss November 19 1933 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss November 27 1933 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss December 21 1933 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss December 22 1933 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss December 27 1933 Washington D C and the Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection 1934 1940 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler January 31 1934 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss February 1 1934 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss February 19 1934 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler March 7 1934 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss April 30 1934 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss May 2 1934 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss June 5 1934 Mildred Barnes Bliss to Royall Tyler June 6 1934 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler June 7 1934 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss June 8 1934 1 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss June 8 1934 2 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss June 14 1934 William Royall Tyler and Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss June 15 1934 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss June 16 1934 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss June 21 1934 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss July 6 1934 1 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss July 6 1934 2 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss July 6 1934 3 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss July 18 1934 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler July 21 1934 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss July 22 1934 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss August 1 1934 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss August 10 1934 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss August 11 1934 Elisina Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss August 18 1934 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler August 28 1934 1 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler August 28 1934 2 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss September 5 1934 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler September 6 1934 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss September 13 1934 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss September 18 1934 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss September 25 1934 1 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler September 25 1934 2 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler October 13 1934 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss October 16 1934 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss October 27 1934 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss October 29 1934 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss November 3 1934 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler November 13 1934 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler November 21 1934 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss December 14 1934 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss January 4 1935 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler January 19 1935 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss February 1 1935 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss February 6 1935 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss February 21 1935 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss March 5 1935 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss March 9 1935 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss March 15 1935 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss March 21 1935 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss March 22 1935 Elisina Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss March 27 1935 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss April 13 1935 Robert Woods Bliss undated 8 between April 14 and 19 1935 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler April 19 1935 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss April 26 1935 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler May 8 1935 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss May 11 1935 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss May 15 1935 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler May 16 1935 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss May 17 1935 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler June 4 1935 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss June 23 1935 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler July 17 1935 1 Elisina Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss July 17 1935 2 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss July 17 1935 3 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss July 31 1935 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss August 1 1935 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss August 10 1935 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss August 20 1935 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss September 3 1935 Elisina Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss October 6 1935 Elisina Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss November 12 1935 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss November 27 1935 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss December 5 1935 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss December 11 1935 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss January 2 1936 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss January 20 1936 1 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss January 20 1936 2 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss January 28 1936 1 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler January 28 1936 2 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss February 1 1936 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss February 17 1936 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss February 28 1936 1 Elisina Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss February 28 1936 2 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss February 29 1936 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss March 1 1936 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss March 6 1936 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss March 7 1936 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss March 9 1936 1 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss March 9 1936 2 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss March 11 1936 Elisina Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss March 14 1936 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss March 16 1936 Elisina Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss March 20 1936 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler March 21 1936 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss March 24 1936 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss March 27 1936 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss March 28 1936 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss April 6 1936 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss April 10 1936 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss April 11 1936 Elisina Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss April 13 1936 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss April 18 1936 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss April 23 1936 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss April 28 1936 Elisina Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss May 11 1936 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss May 26 1936 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss May 28 1936 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss June 28 1936 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss August 16 1936 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss September 8 1936 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss September 30 1936 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss October 11 1936 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss October 27 1936 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss October 31 1936 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss November 6 1936 1 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss November 6 1936 2 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler December 11 1936 1 Elisina Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss December 11 1936 2 Elisina Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss December 11 1936 3 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss December 13 1936 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss December 21 1936 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss December 23 1936 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler January 6 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss January 7 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss January 9 1937 Elisina Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss January 21 1937 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler January 23 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss January 25 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss February 1 1937 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler February 4 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss February 5 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss February 27 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss March 1 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss March 5 1937 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler March 26 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss March 27 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss March 31 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss April 6 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss April 8 1937 1 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler April 8 1937 2 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss April 9 1937 1 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss April 9 1937 2 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss April 16 1937 1 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss April 16 1937 2 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler April 21 1937 1 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler April 21 1937 2 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss April 21 1937 3 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss April 22 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss April 24 1937 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss April 26 1937 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler April 28 1937 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss April 29 1937 1 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss April 29 1937 2 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss May 6 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss May 10 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss May 13 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss May 15 1937 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler May 22 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss May 24 1937 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler May 26 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss May 27 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss May 28 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss May 29 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss June 3 1937 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss June 4 1937 1 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler June 4 1937 2 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler June 5 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss June 7 1937 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler June 8 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss June 9 1937 1 Robert Woods Bliss to Ellis Russell June 9 1937 2 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss June 15 1937 1 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler June 15 1937 2 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss June 16 1937 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler June 22 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss June 23 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss June 26 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss July 5 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss July 6 1937 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler July 9 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss July 11 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss July 16 1937 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler July 18 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss July 25 1937 Ellis Russell to Robert Woods Bliss July 26 1937 1 Robert Woods Bliss to Ellis Russell July 26 1937 2 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss July 29 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss July 31 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss August 1 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss August 2 1937 Elisina Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss August 5 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss August 9 1937 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler August 18 1937 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss August 21 1937 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss September 4 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss September 11 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss September 13 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss September 15 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss September 18 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss September 20 1937 1 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler September 20 1937 2 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss September 25 1937 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler September 26 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss October 7 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss October 8 1937 1 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss October 8 1937 2 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler October 11 1937 1 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler October 11 1937 2 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss October 11 1937 3 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss October 17 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss October 20 1937 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler October 21 1937 1 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss October 21 1937 2 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler October 22 1937 1 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss October 22 1937 2 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss October 25 1937 1 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler October 25 1937 2 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss November 10 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss November 16 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss November 17 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss November 20 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss November 23 1937 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler November 26 1937 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss November 28 1937 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler December 3 1937 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler December 4 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss December 5 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss December 13 1937 1 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss December 13 1937 2 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss December 13 1937 3 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss December 16 1937 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss December 19 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss December 20 1937 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss December 22 1937 1 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss December 22 1937 2 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler December 27 1937 1 Elisina Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss December 27 1937 2 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler December 31 1937 Elisina Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss January 7 1938 1 Mildred Barnes Bliss to Elisina Tyler January 7 1938 2 Elisina Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss January 8 1938 1 Elisina Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss January 8 1938 2 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss January 8 1938 3 Elisina Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss January 9 1938 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss January 10 1938 Elisina Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss January 13 1938 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Elisina Tyler January 19 1938 1 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler January 19 1938 2 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss January 20 1938 1 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss January 20 1938 2 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler January 29 1938 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss January 31 1938 1 Elisina Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss January 31 1938 2 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss January 31 1938 3 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler February 1 1938 1 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss February 1 1938 2 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss February 2 1938 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler February 11 1938 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss February 12 1938 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss February 15 1938 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss February 18 1938 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss February 25 1938 1 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler February 25 1938 2 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss February 28 1938 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss March 15 1938 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler March 30 1938 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss March 31 1938 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss April 5 1938 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss April 12 1938 1 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss April 12 1938 2 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss April 15 1938 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss April 25 1938 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss May 6 1938 1 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss May 6 1938 2 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler May 7 1938 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss May 8 1938 Unattached Account by Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss ca May 8 1938 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss May 16 1938 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler May 21 1938 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss June 13 1938 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler June 16 1938 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss June 18 1938 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss June 22 1938 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss June 24 1938 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss June 28 1938 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss July 2 1938 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss July 4 1938 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss July 10 1938 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss July 13 1938 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss July 14 1938 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss July 20 1938 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler July 25 1938 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss July 26 1938 Mildred Barnes Bliss to Royall Tyler July 29 1938 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler August 3 1938 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss August 4 1938 1 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss August 4 1938 2 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler August 5 1938 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss August 8 1938 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss August 10 1938 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler August 12 1938 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss August 15 1938 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler August 16 1938 1 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss August 16 1938 2 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss September 6 1938 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler September 8 1938 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler September 14 1938 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss September 19 1938 Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler September 21 1938 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss September 22 1938 1 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss September 22 1938 2 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss September 23 1938 Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss September 26 1938 1 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss September 26 1938 2 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss September 27 1938 Royall Tyler to Robert Woods Bliss September 30 1938 Mildred Barnes Bliss and Robert Woods Bliss to Royall Tyler October 3 1938

    Original URL path: http://www.doaks.org/resources/bliss-tyler-correspondence/annotations/ernest-brummer (2016-02-18)
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  • Inspiring Art: The Dumbarton Oaks Birthing Figure — Dumbarton Oaks
    perceptions of this one of a kind sculpture and illustrates its powerful hold on the human imagination In Conjunction with the Exhibition Lecture Pre Columbian Art between the Ethnographic and the Surreal Man Ray s Imagined Americas Wendy Grossman Thursday September 26 2013 5 30 PM RSVP Lecture Bringing the Pre Columbian World to Life The Scholar s Role in Entertainment Media John Pohl Thursday February 6 2014 5 30 PM RSVP This exhibition is part of a year long program of exhibitions and events to celebrate 50 Years of Pre Columbian Art at Dumbarton Oaks Document Actions Print this Share Navigation Museum About Plan Your Visit Guided Tours Byzantine Collection Pre Columbian Collection House Collection Browse the Collections Online Galleries and Exhibitions Special Exhibition Gallery 75 Years 75 Objects Past Special Exhibitions Drink and Prosper Inspiring Art The Dumbarton Oaks Birthing Figure Architectural Contrasts 50 Years of Pre Columbian Art Four Byzantine Manuscripts All Sides Considered New Research on the Maya Collection Still Life Landscape Lasting Impressions Body Art in the Ancient Americas Cross References American Art at Dumbarton Oaks Selections from the House Collection Scattered Evidence Excavating Antioch on the Orontes Flights of Fancy Birds in Pre Columbian

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  • Kurt Weitzmann on the Beginning of Dumbarton Oaks — Dumbarton Oaks
    dogs roaming around in the house during the night At that moment the trainer came around with the two leashed dogs and Mr Bliss remarked Even I am not allowed to touch them Before my lecture I had gone into the beautiful garden laid out by Beatrix Farrand one of America s most outstanding garden architects which had become quite famous Mrs Bliss had taken a very personal interest in everything concerning the garden and at that time it was almost twice as large as it is today half of it was given to the city of Washington when Dumbarton Oaks became a Harvard institution Mrs Bliss had an ulterior motive in asking me to give the lec ture In her effort to turn Dumbarton Oaks into a scholarly place devoted to the study of Byzantine art and culture she was eager to build up a research library in this field The task fell to Mrs Sessions who had no training in Byzantine art and so I was asked whether I would be willing to be consulted on library acquisitions and I agreed Not long after my lecture I spent a couple of days in Washington studying the collection and discussing details of the building up of a library After this Mrs Sessions would come to Princeton regularly with book lists and catalogues and we would go over them Thus I had a part in building the ground stock of the Dumbarton Oaks library which later under the expert guid ance of Mrs Vaslev and with the assistance of the research fellows in residence grew into the outstanding library it is today Mrs Sessions was a highly intelligent and very charming woman and we became lifelong friends remaining so even after she left Dum barton Oaks In 1940 Dumbarton Oaks was given by the Blisses to Harvard University and officially turned into a research institution The Blisses moved out of the big house and bought a smaller one in Georgetown where every year on the last day of a symposium the guests would be entertained Some of the living rooms at Dumbarton Oaks were turned into library rooms and stacks were built on two floors The main concern of the new institution was intended to be Byzantine art and culture but it was not the sole concern Some years later Mr Bliss left his pre Columbian art collection to Dumbarton Oaks after it had been exhibited for several years in the National Gallery A special building was erected by Philip Johnson the well known architect The third unit is the garden library which had always been Mrs Bliss s very special pride second only to the Byzantine collection On October 1 1940 the Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection held its grand opening Igor Stravinsky had been commissioned by Mrs Bliss to compose a concerto known today as the Dumbarton Oaks Concerto Stravinsky came to Wash ington to conduct the piece personally and it was such a success that he had to play it twice The next day a series of four lec tures were given by scholars who were not only considered the most outstanding representatives of their fields but had been se lected for rotating yearly appointments as Director of Studies at the new institution Actually two or three years earlier when plans began to shape up the first directorship had been offered to Adolph Goldschmidt This was meant as an inducement to bring him to America and have him for two years as the first director after which time he would retire under such conditions that he could live comfortably in the United States But he declined be cause of his advanced age and since he was living in Switzerland in 1940 he was not even able to come to the opening The first of the four lectures at the opening was given by Henri Focillon the Frenchman who had for years divided his time between Paris and Yale University He had been a very successful teacher at Yale and trained quite a group of American scholars there Yet he was that type of Frenchman who although he came every year to America refused to the last to speak a word of English Focillon was the first Director of Studies succeeded the next year by the second speaker Charles Rufus Morey Since Princeton was at that time the center of research in the field of Byzantine art Mrs Bliss had from the very beginning when she first be came interested in it sought Morey s advice and became one of the supporters of the Antioch project As a result Dumbarton Oaks received some of the best Antioch mosaics and a few ob jects Moreover Dumbarton Oaks acquired a copy of the Index of Christian Art from Princeton an important research tool The third speaker was Wilhelm Koehler who had been a professor at the University of Jena and at the same time director of the Museum of Weimar but had left Germany before the Nazi regime to accept a professorship at Harvard As I remember he was Director of Studies for two years and for a time it seemed that he would become the permanent director He began some research projects like the Fontes but then was succeeded by Albert M Friend from Princeton Koehler took this replacement very personally and broke off his old friendship with Friend I personally stayed out of this deplorable situation and maintained my good relations with Koehler I visited him regularly when I went to Cambridge twice a year for meetings of the Dumbarton Oaks advisory council of which I was a member The fourth lecturer was Michael Rostovtzeff the eminent Russian historian who had become a professor at Yale I pre sume it was for reasons of health that he never became Director of Studies for a year Dumbarton Oaks was run by two people The Director of Studies was responsible for all scholarly activities and research projects and another

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  • Anniversary Blog — Dumbarton Oaks
    was his idea that the whole series of lectures should be given by only two persons Friend and myself We were asked to present in condensed form the essential ideas of the Manuscript Course we gave together every year in Princeton and which had become known beyond our university LaPiana came to Princeton to dis cuss this symposium We had dinner together and over drinks LaPiana s tongue was loosened and he talked not only about the symposium but told us his life story how he had been a monk and eloped Friend and I agreed to give the symposium but later Friend reneged and it fell upon my shoulders to give my half of the course in four lectures while the rest of the symposium was composed of unconnected papers My lectures outlined what was four years later in 1947 published under the title Illustrations in Roll and Codex My main idea was that the copying of pictures took place according to certain rules comparable to but not identical with those of textual criticism so that we could talk of picture criticism In the lively discussion that followed old Vasiliev a permanent member of Dumbarton Oaks got up and remarked What you said about textual criticism is all right which relieved me greatly since I am not a trained textual critic and had to rely on secondhand information but when it comes to art the artist is free He like many art historians resisted the idea that an artist should be under any restrictions I did not have to defend myself Who should come to my rescue but Werner Jaeger the renowned classicist from Harvard While still in Berlin he had edited the journal Die Antike which contained articles from both the fields of philology and archaeology and he himself had a remarkable insight into the creative process of writ ing and of the visual arts Thus he was in a position to recognize the similarity of the principles that operated in both fields Jaeger supported me and defended my ideas to the hilt K Weitzmann Sailing with Byzantium from Europe to America The Memoirs of an Art Historian Munich 1994 143 51 Read More Hans Peter L Orange Remembers His Year at Dumbarton Oaks 1950 Posted on Jan 14 2016 11 00 AM by Dumbarton Oaks Archives Permalink Filed under Scholars of Dumbarton Oaks Byzantine Studies Life at Dumbarton Oaks In Their Own Words Visiting scholar Read comments None yet Hans Peter L Orange 1903 1983 an art historian and classical archaeologist was a Visiting Scholar in the Byzantine Studies program at Dumbarton Oaks in 1949 50 and he participated in the 1950 symposium The Emperor and the Palace After his return to Oslo he wrote the Blisses on July 5 1950 reminiscing on his year at Dumbarton Oaks An excerpt from that letter follows Some part of my person is still staying with the friends and colleagues at the Dumbarton Oaks working in the library and meditating in the gardens and will not in spite of my energetic efforts acquiesce to the forms and principles of pre Dumbartian life The energies of this part of my person would naturally manifest themselves in some written records from the Dumbarton Oaks its library collections and gardens and first of all its scholarly life I would prepare these records for some Scandinavian reviews and newspapers but cannot begin before having the photographs from the Dumbarton Oaks which I am eagerly waiting for At the Dumbarton Oaks it impressed me very much to see how in a circle of specialized scholars who are supplementing each other the true reality of knowledge which was the fortune of earlier generations and modern specialized research has lost in some way is reestablished This was perhaps my greatest experience in that beautiful American Platonopolis of Washington which was more successful than that of Plotianus in Campania 17 centuries ago When I recall this experience and my whole stay at the Dumbarton Oaks not only as a place of study and scholarship but also of art and beauty and last but not least of what I think is true American friendliness I am full of thankfulness to the country the institution and persons who offered it to me My special thank is then addressed to you Mr and Mrs Woods Bliss also for all your kindness to me in your house in Washington Speakers at the 1950 Byzantine Studies Symposium left to right Andreas Alföldi Francis Dvornik Albert Mathias Friend Jr Hans Peter L Orange Ernst Kantorowicz Paul Underwood André Grabar seated Read More Wilhelm Koehler The Dumbarton Oaks Program and the Principle of Collaborative Research Posted on Dec 31 2015 11 00 AM by Dumbarton Oaks Archives Permalink Filed under Scholars of Dumbarton Oaks In Their Own Words Byzantine Studies Fellows Read comments None yet Wilhelm Koehler a professor of medieval art history at Harvard University came to Dumbarton Oaks in 1941 as Senior Research Fellow in Charge of Research see post He stayed until 1944 Arriving at the height of the Second World War Koehler devised a program of collaborative research whereby Fellows spent roughly half of each work day researching early Byzantine architecture mosaics and wall paintings In their research they employed both primary and secondary materials from the Dumbarton Oaks Library Their findings were stored in vertical files organized by geographical location site and building This collective material constituted the Research Archives and was meant to enable future scholars to better pursue their research see post It also was intended to complement the Princeton Index of Christian Art of which Dumbarton Oaks owned a copy and the Census of Objects of Early Christian and Byzantine Art in North American Collections a survey which Mildred and Robert Woods Bliss had initiated in 1938 before the transfer of Dumbarton Oaks to Harvard University Koehler read his paper on The Dumbarton Oaks Program and the Principle of Collaborative Research before the College Art Association on January 23 1942 a year before he published the paper in Speculum The following are extracts from that paper At the end of November 1940 the Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection was formally conveyed to the President and Fellows of Harvard College by the founders Mr and Mrs Robert Woods Bliss The magnificent gift consisting of the former residence of Mr and Mrs Bliss with the beautiful gardens of the famous collection and the excellent Fine Arts Library envisaged also the continued acquisition of objects for the Collection the further development of the Library and the pursuit of research in the Byzantine and Mediaeval humanities Though connected with Harvard Dumbarton Oaks could be developed in a direction which would make it possible for other than Harvard students to partake in its activities By admitting only students with a record of some years of graduate work a patent weakness in the present academic training of young scholars could be corrected Normally a graduate student who has passed his generals for the doctor s degree must rush into a job which absorbs him completely He can hardly spare the time to work on his thesis and his scholarly training has come to an end at a point where it just begins to dawn on him what scholarship and original research mean At least for a number of particularly able students Dumbarton Oaks as its founders had foreseen could offer an opportunity for research and intellectual development unhampered by a heavy burden of duties since it was not difficult to provide at Dumbarton Oaks attractive living quarters and study rooms We expect that eventually a certain regularity in the yearly turn over of older Fellows into suitable positions elsewhere and their replacement by younger scholars will develop which would provide at the same time for a continuous circulation of new blood and for the establishment of the necessary tradition and continuity in research and scholarship There are two serious lacunae in the scholarly equipment at the disposal of the scholar who investigates the problem first the written sources have never been systematically collected secondly while the smaller objects like ivories manuscripts etc have been studied and published the monumental material consisting of structures and of their sculptural and pictorial decoration has never been comprehensively investigated and coordinated It is not difficult to account for this neglect Both tasks are of such a scope that no single scholar could hope to tackle them successfully But we were in a more fortunate position Dumbarton Oaks offered an opportunity to fill the gap and thus to make an important contribution to the solution of the crucial problem which had defied the efforts of earlier scholars The research program of Dumbarton Oaks implies that individual efforts of a group of scholars are directed towards a common goal of broad historical scope That means that to a certain degree the individual scholar yields his independence in favor of collaboration with other scholars I hope my report on the program has shown that the limitation of independence is in fact negligible and involves no sacrifice on the part of the individual that would endanger his scholarly integrity or would entail any suppression of original thought and independent judgment W Koehler The Dumbarton Oaks Program and the Principle of Collaborative Research Speculum 18 No 1 January 1943 118 123 Read More Kurt Weitzmann Byzantine Art and Scholarship in America Posted on Dec 14 2015 11 00 AM by Dumbarton Oaks Archives Permalink Filed under Scholars of Dumbarton Oaks In Their Own Words Byzantine Studies Read comments None yet Byzantine art historian Kurt Weitzmann a professor at Princeton University had a long informal relationship with Dumbarton Oaks eventually becoming a Visiting Scholar in the 1970s and participating in symposia and publications at Dumbarton Oaks throughout his career He also advised on acquisitions for the Byzantine Collection He eventually donated to Dumbarton Oaks his extensive collection of photographs of Byzantine manuscripts which are now housed in the Image Collections and Fieldwork Archives see here The following are extracts from his paper Byzantine Art and Scholarship in America published in the American Journal of Archaeology 51 no 4 October December 1947 394 418 A few years ago a second center of studies in Byzantine art arose in this country at Dumbarton Oaks in Washington D C After Mr and Mrs Robert Woods Bliss became interested in Byzantine art and began to collect Byzantine objects they soon envisaged combining their collection with a research library When in 1940 they made Dumbarton Oaks a generous gift to Harvard University the establishment already contained a sizeable and workable library in the field of the arts which had been brought together in a very short time Since this transfer to Harvard University took place after the outbreak of the war it was foreseen that a difficult period lay ahead but it is a testimony to the vitality of this institution that in these trying years it developed almost immediately into a research center which today is firmly established and has taken its permanent place among the research institutions of America The end of the war has also made it possible to call visiting scholars from abroad for a certain length of time and Dumbarton Oaks has been very fortunate to have had as its guest this year André Grabar from the Collège de France Thus another ambition of the founders of Dumbarton Oaks has been realized namely the establishment of a close personal contact with European scholars In the years to come scholars from other countries will be invited for a length of time and in this respect Dumbarton Oaks fulfils a great mission by paving the way for closer international cooperation and mutual understanding The reputation of Dumbarton Oaks as of any learned institution will ultimately rest on the standard of its publications Even before Dumbarton Oaks was donated to Harvard plans had been made for the publication of a series of studies called The Dumbarton Oaks Papers to appear at irregular intervals The scope of the Papers was broadened and they were turned into an organ in which studies on all aspects of Byzantine culture principally those of the scholars in residence could be published In the meantime plans have been laid by A M Friend for another series consisting of larger monographs to include documentary studies of important single monuments or groups of monuments Some of them grew out of lecture series delivered during the yearly symposia about which we should like to say a few words Ever since the inaugural lectures in November 1940 the idea had been cherished to have a symposium once a year which would bring together the scholars in the Early Christian and Byzantine field The beginning was made by the late E K Rand when in the spring of 1942 he gathered a number of his former students to present papers on a variety of subjects But beginning in the following year the symposium began to crystallize around a central topic and thus took on a distinct character different from the annual meetings of learned societies in which a great number of short papers are usually presented In outlining briefly the activities of the Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection we are fully aware that we have not described their full scope but in accordance with the purpose of this report have primarily stressed the work in the Fine Arts Yet it must be emphasized once more that the aim of this institution is not exclusively the furtherance of the knowledge of Byzantine art but the study and integration of all aspects of Byzantine history and culture so that ultimately a coherent picture of this great civilization can be achieved although art and archaeology will remain the focus by the very nature of the foundation Read More Mildred Bliss In Memoriam Henri Focillon 1943 Posted on Oct 12 2015 11 00 AM by Dumbarton Oaks Archives Permalink Filed under Scholars of Dumbarton Oaks In Their Own Words The First Decade of Dumbarton Oaks Read comments None yet Henri Focillon 1881 1943 was the first Senior Scholar at Dumbarton Oaks After a prolonged illness he died on March 3 1943 having been unable to return to France due to the Second World War Mildred Bliss was enormously fond of Focillon and close to both him and his wife Two days after his death she read this memorial tribute to those assembled in the Dumbarton Oaks Music Room Friday March 5 1943 4 o clock Dumbarton Oaks today is moved very deeply moved Maître Henri Focillon its friend will never again sit amongst us radiating wisdom and charm and wit One s memory sees him coming cautiously down these steps his head stooped and to one side and from under heavy lenses those clever and observing eyes seeing everything while he deprecatingly says Ah Madame j ai de si mauvais yeux je ne vois rien But a moment later still looking down though pointing upward to a textile high on the wall Ah La belle tapisserie copte les Néréïdes n est ce pas J aurai beaucoup de plaisir a l étudier de plus près Seldom has knowledge been disseminated with so gentle a touch or wit been so kindly or instruction so enthralling Henri Focillon was the embodiment of the Mediterranean Culture as expressed through the long and distinguished tradition of the humanistic discipline in France His nature as capacious for right feeling as his brain for broad thinking held unswervingly to his self imposed loyalties He abhorred cruelty despised insincerity and had contempt for the meretricious in all its forms Yet it was not because of his intense dislikes that the world recognized the strength of his unusual personality but because of the integrities by which he lived Kindliness and witty ridicule were his most devastating arms and he had never I imagine been defeated in a tilt With apprehensions so sensitive and analytical abilities so developed he had the exceptional capacity for moral suffering which is the price that must be met by the intellectual and the aesthete The somber tragedy of his country bowed him down Dumbarton Oaks cannot forget the physical battle for survival that Professor Focillon waged with his stricken heart waged and won during two years of torment A lesser nature would have been destroyed long since But the wound was too deep The Master groped through the black night which engulfs France and knew he would never see his land again But though too late for him he held the certainty of the rebirth of his race and the continuity of his nation Of Focillon s scholarly activities I am not alas competent to speak Professor Koehler his colleague whose gifts our friend greatly respected will I know do justice to the results of a lifetime of great industry and constructive accomplishments We laymen will remember him for his genius for stimulating the best within our poor selves no longer barren under the spell of his radiating mellowness Dumbarton Oaks has had the rare privilege of being led by him he lived among us he shared our daily life and his wisdom and his smile are woven into the texture of our inheritance the rich inheritance of the Humanism of France of which he was both the disciple and the master From the Thames to the Rio de la Plata from Moscow and Leningrad to Constantinople and throughout the breadth of Europe there was admiration for the scholarship and respect for the character of Maître Henri Focillon of the Collège de France and of Dumbarton Oaks where there is enduring affection as well Mildred Bliss For a tribute to Henri Focillon by his former students see here Jurgis Baltrušaitis Sumner Crosby and Henri Focillon Yale University Read More Life in the Fellows Building Posted on Oct 05 2015 11 00 AM by Dumbarton Oaks Archives Permalink Filed under In Their Own Words

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  • The Dumbarton Oaks Conversations, 1944 — Dumbarton Oaks
    and to take other appropriate measures to strengthen universal peace to achieve international co operation in the solution of international economic social and other humanitarian problems and to afford a center for harmonizing the actions of nations in the achievement of these common ends The delegates agreed on a tentative proposal to meet these goals on October 7 1944 In his Witness to History 1929 1969 New York 1973 C E Bohlen observes that Dumbarton Oaks settled all but two issues regarding the organization of the United Nations the voting procedure in the Security Council and the Soviet pressure for the admission of all sixteen of the Soviet republics to the General Assembly It took the conference at Yalta plus further negotiations with Moscow before the issues were solved p 159 Informal meeting in the Study at Dumbarton Oaks Seated left to right Peter Loxley Sir Alexander Cadogan Edward R Stettinius Jr Andrei A Gromyko Arkadii A Sobolev Valentin M Berezhkov Standing left to right James Clement Dunn and Leo Pasvolsky Photo National Archives Washington D C 1944 British delegation meeting in what is now the Director s Office at Dumbarton Oaks Robert Woods Bliss 1875 1962 who with his wife Mildred Barnes Bliss 1879 1969 had given Dumbarton Oaks to Harvard University in 1940 to establish a scholarly research institute and museum in Byzantine studies was instrumental in arranging these meetings Already in June 1942 on behalf of the director John S Thacher and the Trustees for Harvard University he had offered to place the facilities of Dumbarton Oaks at the disposal of Secretary of State Cordell Hull When the State Department found that Dumbarton Oaks could comfortably accommodate the delegates and that the environment was ideal the offer was renewed by James B Conant the president of Harvard University in a letter of June 30 1944 The State Department accepted the offer in large part because the alternative venues had unattractive rooms in comparison to the sophisticated interiors of Dumbarton Oaks Dumbarton Oaks also was situated at the heights of Georgetown one of the coolest locations in Washington D C a major consideration given the hot and humid summer weather and the rarity of air conditioning at the time The size and layout of the rooms at Dumbarton Oaks were appropriate for seating the number of people and installing offices as necessary and the estate s relative isolation offered the privacy and security needed for these unofficial talks In order to host the discussions and make visiting delegates feel comfortable the Main House at Dumbarton Oaks had to undergo some minor adjustments During the course of the conversations the Music Room was temporarily renamed the Assembly Room the Orangery served as a cafeteria for buffet luncheons and a signed photograph of Polish pianist Ignacy Jan Paderewski which sat atop the Steinway concert grand piano was removed for fear that it would ignite conflict with the Soviets Members of the American delegation at luncheon on the Orangery terrace at

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