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  • About the Acorn House — Dumbarton Oaks
    the Service Court and the Gardeners Court The building constructed in this location first served as the Kennels Built in 1932 the Kennels housed the Doberman Pinschers that patrolled the estate at night providing security The Blisses liked dogs and other breeds were kept at the Kennels where the Superintendent cared for them Beatrix Farrand even designed a bench for this area The Kennels were discontinued when Robert and Mildred Bliss gave Dumbarton Oaks to Harvard in 1940 A year later the building was refurbished and repurposed into a residence Ethel B Clark occupied the building Mrs Clark as she was called worked on the library staff at Dumbarton Oaks In the early 1950s Superintendent Don Smith moved into the house A series of additions made in 1951 and 1963 extended the building to the north and south G Morris Steinbraker and Sons the firm that designed and built these additions also worked on the Director s House plans for the Garden Center and much of the North Vista redesign Don Smith and his family lived in the house until 1992 when Donald Pumphrey took up residence The building which was by this time called the Acorn House continued to

    Original URL path: http://www.doaks.org/library-archives/garden-archives/drawings-and-photographs-by-garden-area/acorn-house/about-the-acorn-house (2016-02-18)
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  • Drawings — Dumbarton Oaks
    Archives Drawings and Photographs by Garden Area Acorn House Drawings Archive Navigation Garden Archives Home Contents Index Search Refine Help Drawings Info Drawings Alteration to kennels Dog bench for the kennels Document Actions Print this Share Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection 1703 32nd Street NW Washington DC 20007 Site Map Web Accessibility Contact Us Visit Us Staff Directory Employment Rights and Reproductions Staff Login Newsletter Webmail Service Desk 2014

    Original URL path: http://www.doaks.org/library-archives/garden-archives/drawings-and-photographs-by-garden-area/acorn-house/drawings (2016-02-18)
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  • Arbor Terrace — Dumbarton Oaks
    Archives Drawings and Photographs by Garden Area Arbor Terrace Archive Navigation Garden Archives Home Contents Index Search Refine Help Arbor Terrace Info Arbor Terrace About the Arbor Terrace Drawings Historic Photographs Document Actions Print this Share Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection 1703 32nd Street NW Washington DC 20007 Site Map Web Accessibility Contact Us Visit Us Staff Directory Employment Rights and Reproductions Staff Login Newsletter Webmail Service Desk 2014

    Original URL path: http://www.doaks.org/library-archives/garden-archives/drawings-and-photographs-by-garden-area/arbor-terrace (2016-02-18)
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  • About the Arbor Terrace — Dumbarton Oaks
    Terrace or E Terrace started to take shape Farrand s vision for this space developed from the European concept of a giardini segreti or secret garden To accomplish this effect Farrand planned an intimate green space enclosed by box hedges and fragrant herb borders to the north and east She masked the severity of the high retaining wall to the west with an oak arbor based on a 16th century design by French architect Jacques Androuet du Cerceau for the Chateau Montargis Lavender and white wisteria coated the arbor creating a sense of seclusion Within the arbor two stuccoed niches added ornamental detail One contained a lead book box which was removed in the 1970s due to water damage and deterioration The other niche features a fountain and pool of water The central expanse of the Arbor Terrace was one of the first elements to change Beatrix Farrand s original plan called for the space to be predominately green with diagonal planting beds of fragrant herbs leading the eye north over the orchard This design quickly proved too difficult and complex to keep up By 1933 a more formally proportioned herb garden took its place However during World War II the central beds underwent further modification as the herb plantings required too much upkeep for the reduced wartime staff and budget When Farrand wrote her Plant Book for Dumbarton Oaks in 1944 an unbroken expanse of grass filled the garden In 1949 Mildred Bliss and Ruth Havey began plans for a redesign Their work culminated in a large renovation in 1954 55 Paving of Tennessee Crab Orchard stone replaced the grass and a low Rococo parterre of Doria stone added structure to the space Stone walls replaced the box hedges and the original oak arbor was rebuilt in Cypress To

    Original URL path: http://www.doaks.org/library-archives/garden-archives/drawings-and-photographs-by-garden-area/arbor-terrace/about-the-arbor-terrace (2016-02-18)
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  • Drawings — Dumbarton Oaks
    and section Arbor on E Terrace Existing grades for Arbor Terrace Dimensioned plan for Arbor Terrace Gate and balcony Plan of Arbor Terrace Pool in arbor Plan of Arbor Terrace and Fountain Terrace Sketch of wall fountain for Terrace E 1 Sketch of wall fountain for Terrace E 2 Sketch of wall fountain for Terrace E 3 Sketch of wall fountain for Terrace E 4 Sketch of wall fountain for

    Original URL path: http://www.doaks.org/library-archives/garden-archives/drawings-and-photographs-by-garden-area/arbor-terrace/drawings (2016-02-18)
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  • Historic Photographs — Dumbarton Oaks
    Garden Archives Home Contents Index Search Refine Help Historic Photographs Info Historic Photographs Gate opening north side of flower garden before construction of gates Arbor Terrace gate view south Balcony seat overlooking orchard Arbor Terrace balcony view north Arbor Terrace parterre and balcony view north Wisteria Arbor in bloom wide view Wisteria Arbor in bloom view northwest Wisteria arbor in bloom view west Arbor in E Terrace before paving view south Wisteria Arbor and seats view south Arbor Terrace view east Mock up of bookcase panel with Italian inscription Bookcase panel with Italian inscription close up Wisteria Arbor panel with Italian inscription view west Wisteria Arbor and wall fountain view west Wall fountain close up 1 Wall fountain close up 2 Wall fountain close up 3 Arbor Terrace and Wisteria Arbor view west Arbor Terrace view northeast Terrace with scrolls view northeast Arbor Terrace and Wisteria Arbor view southwest Arbor Terrace and Wisteria Arbor view northwest Doria and wood seat in Arbor Terrace view north Terrace with Doria and wood seat Next 1 2 Document Actions Print this Share Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection 1703 32nd Street NW Washington DC 20007 Site Map Web Accessibility Contact Us Visit Us

    Original URL path: http://www.doaks.org/library-archives/garden-archives/drawings-and-photographs-by-garden-area/arbor-terrace/historic-photographs (2016-02-18)
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  • About the Beech Terrace — Dumbarton Oaks
    beech grew northeast of the Orangery The beech was original to the property and already so large that it dominated its space Farrand admired the tree and planned the terrace to highlight it When the pierced brick balustrades and retaining walls were built between each terrace level Farrand made sure that the wall separating the Beech Terrace from the Urn Terrace to the east did not disturb the beech s extensive root system The beech dominated the terrace not only due to its immense size and dark purple leaves but also as Farrand said in the Plant Book because it is notoriously hard to make anything grow under a Beech tree The webbing of roots combined with deep overhead shade made it difficult for groundcover to flourish Farrand tried periwinkle ivy and honeysuckle along with a few spring bulbs like snowdrops and scilla At the borders and especially along the footpath she planted small box bushes In the 1960s much of the box on the western edge of the terrace was replaced with a bed of ivy and turf replaced the struggling ground cover By this time the nature of the Beech Terrace had changed quite significantly due to the death of the original beech The dark purple leaved English beech died in the late 1940s and a green leaved American variety took its place The change in leaf color and size of the beech made an impact on the terrace because the central tree truly dominates the design In addition to the very simple plantings Beatrix Farrand and Mildred Bliss planned very little garden ornament for the space In 1934 35 Farrand designed a delicate swing seat with a lead canopy and it was placed in the northeast corner A Weeping Higan Cherry boxwood winter jasmine and ivy framed

    Original URL path: http://www.doaks.org/library-archives/garden-archives/drawings-and-photographs-by-garden-area/beech-terrace/about-the-beech-terrace (2016-02-18)
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  • Drawings — Dumbarton Oaks
    Info Drawings Swing seat for Beech Terrace 1 Lead roof for swing seat for Beech Terrace front elevation Construction of rafters and ridge of swing seat support for Beech Terrace Roof for swing seat A Terrace section showing end curve End elevation of roof of swing seat support Beech Terrace Construction of branches on end elevation swing seat Beech Terrace Construction of branches on front and rear elevation swing seat Beech Terrace 1 Construction of branches on front and rear elevation swing seat Beech Terrace 2 Bird number 1 for swing seat support Beech Terrace Bird number 2 for swing seat support Beech Terrace Bird number 3 for swing seat support Beech Terrace Bird number 4 for swing seat support Beech Terrace Bird number 5 for swing seat support Beech Terrace Bird number 6 for swing seat support Beech Terrace Sketch for finials for swing seat support Beech Terrace Beech Terrace and Urn Garden planting plan with legend 1959 Swing seat for Beech Terrace 2 Stool table for Beech Terrace 1 Stool table for Beech Terrace 2 Stool table for Beech Terrace 3 Document Actions Print this Share Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection 1703 32nd Street NW Washington DC

    Original URL path: http://www.doaks.org/library-archives/garden-archives/drawings-and-photographs-by-garden-area/beech-terrace/drawings (2016-02-18)
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