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  • About the Entrance Drive — Dumbarton Oaks
    headed north cutting through where the Garden Library stands now With the exception of Blount s side drive the driveway remains much the same as it was first constructed Beatrix Farrand s first design for the entrance drive and forecourt is dated 1926 To integrate the existing drive with her overall vision of the gardens Farrand carefully chose paving and plantings that blended in scale and color with the surrounding house and gardens To provide privacy for the house she planted tall evergreens at the R street wall and gates The evergreens which included a spruce 20 foot box trees and magnolias were chosen for dark foliage rather than hues of bluish or yellow green Plant Book 11 For paving Farrand chose tan river gravel with borders of Belgian block The forecourt at the entrance of the house was paved entirely in bluestone In 1927 the Blisses purchased two 18 th century French urns and placed them at the forecourt adding a touch of formality and ornament to the drive Privacy dictated much of the early design of the driveway Between 1931 and 1934 Farrand designed gates for the entrances on R Street as well as a Porter s Lodge The Arts and Crafts style gates were massive constructed of thick paneled wood These gates remained in place until Mildred Bliss commissioned Ruth Havey to create replacements in 1953 The new gates completed in 1956 were constructed of painted and gilded wrought iron The fresh airy design opened up a view of the house and gardens to R Street welcoming visitors who entered by way of the Porter s Lodge The construction of the Garden Library and Ribbon Walk in 1962 brought some changes to the branch of the driveway leading to 32 nd street The curve of the drive

    Original URL path: http://www.doaks.org/library-archives/garden-archives/drawings-and-photographs-by-garden-area/entrance-drive/about-the-entrance-drive (2016-02-18)
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  • Fellows’ Quarters and Yard — Dumbarton Oaks
    by Garden Area Fellows Quarters and Yard Archive Navigation Garden Archives Home Contents Index Search Refine Help Fellows Quarters and Yard Info Fellows Quarters and Yard About the Fellows Quarters and Yard Drawings Historic Photographs Document Actions Print this Share Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection 1703 32nd Street NW Washington DC 20007 Site Map Web Accessibility Contact Us Visit Us Staff Directory Employment Rights and Reproductions Staff Login Newsletter

    Original URL path: http://www.doaks.org/library-archives/garden-archives/drawings-and-photographs-by-garden-area/fellows-quarters-and-yard (2016-02-18)
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  • About the Fellows' Quarters and Yard — Dumbarton Oaks
    by Garden Area Fellows Quarters and Yard About the Fellows Quarters and Yard Archive Navigation Garden Archives Home Contents Index Search Refine Help About the Fellows Quarters and Yard Info About the Fellows Quarters and Yard Document Actions Print this Share Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection 1703 32nd Street NW Washington DC 20007 Site Map Web Accessibility Contact Us Visit Us Staff Directory Employment Rights and Reproductions Staff Login

    Original URL path: http://www.doaks.org/library-archives/garden-archives/drawings-and-photographs-by-garden-area/fellows-quarters-and-yard/about-the-fellows-quarters-and-yard (2016-02-18)
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  • Drawings — Dumbarton Oaks
    Archives Garden Archives Drawings and Photographs by Garden Area Fellows Quarters and Yard Drawings Archive Navigation Garden Archives Home Contents Index Search Refine Help Drawings Info Drawings Come back later Document Actions Print this Share Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection 1703 32nd Street NW Washington DC 20007 Site Map Web Accessibility Contact Us Visit Us Staff Directory Employment Rights and Reproductions Staff Login Newsletter Webmail Service Desk 2014 Dumbarton

    Original URL path: http://www.doaks.org/library-archives/garden-archives/drawings-and-photographs-by-garden-area/fellows-quarters-and-yard/drawings (2016-02-18)
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  • Historic Photographs — Dumbarton Oaks
    in construction 2 Fellows Building front facade 1 Fellows Building front facade 2 Fellows Building facade and courtyard Fellows Building detail of building 1 Fellows Building detail of building 2 Fellows Building detail of building 3 Path behind Fellows Building 1 Path behind Fellows Building 2 Path behind Fellows Building 3 Fellows Building front facade with fence Man walking through gate at southeast corner of Fellows Building Document Actions Print

    Original URL path: http://www.doaks.org/library-archives/garden-archives/drawings-and-photographs-by-garden-area/fellows-quarters-and-yard/historic-photographs (2016-02-18)
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  • About the Forsythia Dell — Dumbarton Oaks
    stretch down one hillside across a valley and up into Dumbarton Oaks Park to the north Originally covering a full acre the Forsythia Dell was the largest most expansive and most dramatic of the single bloom garden areas that Farrand planted Unlike Cherry Hill or Crabapple Hill which featured different varieties of similar trees the Forsythia Dell featured only one variety of forsythia Identical shrubs and blooms magnified the effect of flowers pouring down the hillside To help shape the forsythia to the contours of the landscape Farrand recommended extensive yearly pruning She also planted silver maples at the top of the hill to add height above the mass of yellow flowers In the intervening years the silver maples have been replaced with tulip poplars and pruning occurs less frequently The Forsythia Dell features a small oval terrace halfway down the hill toward Dumbarton Oaks Park On the terrace Farrand placed a limestone urn and pedestal adapted in the 1930s from an Armand Albert Rateau design Two limestone benches flank the column The benches designed in 1937 are called the Two Friends and they are dedicated to Robert and Mildred Bliss s close friends William and Caroline Phillips At the

    Original URL path: http://www.doaks.org/library-archives/garden-archives/drawings-and-photographs-by-garden-area/forsythia-dell/about-the-forsythia-dell (2016-02-18)
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  • Drawings — Dumbarton Oaks
    composite section F S D plan of kidney seat sheet 1 F S D plan of kidney seat sheet 2 Splat number 2 for kidney seat Splat number 3 for kidney seat Splat number 4 for kidney seat Splat number 5 for kidney seat Splat number 6 for kidney seat Splat number 7 for kidney seat Splat number 8 for kidney seat Splat number 9 for kidney seat Splat number

    Original URL path: http://www.doaks.org/library-archives/garden-archives/drawings-and-photographs-by-garden-area/forsythia-dell/drawings (2016-02-18)
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  • About the Fountain Terrace — Dumbarton Oaks
    Garden entrance On the staircase leading into the terrace she planned landings that overlooked the geometric planting beds below Later she added intricate iron balconies and a lead canopied bench to invite visitors to pause on the steps before entering The earliest plans for the Fountain Terrace actually did not contain any fountains The first design planted in the mid 1920s featured a central circular flowerbed anchored by boxwoods and surrounded by geometric beds outlined in flagstone In 1927 Farrand began drawing fountain designs and by 1930 two matching pools were in place The following year she added the fountains of a putto holding a fish The addition of the pools marked a turning point in the design aesthetic of the Fountain Terrace from English Cottage to a formal Mediterranean garden style Instead of a pattern of flowerbeds fanning out across the terrace the majority of the rectangular expanse became unbroken lawn and high mounded beds were planted along the walls Even in such a simplified planting design Farrand exercised her eye for detail To add a sense of gravitas and antiquity to the garden she specified in the Plant Book that the stone curbs surrounding the fountains must be

    Original URL path: http://www.doaks.org/library-archives/garden-archives/drawings-and-photographs-by-garden-area/fountain-terrace/about-the-fountain-terrace (2016-02-18)
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