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  • Drawings — Dumbarton Oaks
    Library Archives Garden Archives Drawings and Photographs by Garden Area Green Garden Drawings Archive Navigation Garden Archives Home Contents Index Search Refine Help Drawings Info Drawings Come back later Document Actions Print this Share Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection 1703 32nd Street NW Washington DC 20007 Site Map Web Accessibility Contact Us Visit Us Staff Directory Employment Rights and Reproductions Staff Login Newsletter Webmail Service Desk 2014 Dumbarton Oaks

    Original URL path: http://www.doaks.org/library-archives/garden-archives/drawings-and-photographs-by-garden-area/green-garden/drawings (2016-02-18)
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  • About the Herbaceous Border — Dumbarton Oaks
    Kitchen Gardens the garden room features a long turf walkway stretching east to west lined with parallel 100 foot long seasonal flower beds and thick green hedges Tall solitary Irish yews mark the ends of the Herbaceous Border In many ways the plantings remains unchanged from Beatrix Farrand s original design as it was created in 1928 29 Farrand intended the Herbaceous Border to be a lush floral space providing a color counterpoint to the rich beds of the Fountain Terrace Where the Fountain Terrace was planted to warm reds and oranges the Herbaceous Border featured blooms in cool shades of pink lavender and pale blue Farrand chose the plantings not only for color but also for peak bloom times that fell in spring and fall This coincided with the Bliss s occupancy of the house and maximized the beauty of the gardens when they could appreciate it most The inclusion of the Irish yews at the east and west injected a bit of playfulness into the garden room The yews were christened Mrs Yew west and Mr Yew east and they whimsically represented the Blisses The tall green markers echoed the yew hedges and bookended the garden room with enclosed seating areas including the four Elizabethan benches Farrand designed in 1934 By the 1940s the yew hedge proved a headache to Beatrix Farrand It was overgrown and hard to maintain and she began plans to replace it with stone walls The proposed redesign coincided with the new stone walls being built on the North Vista in 1943 44 However the yew hedge remained for some time until it was finally replaced with new low maintenance shrubs rather than hardscape After the 1950s and Beatrix Farrand s departure the greatest change to the Herbaceous Border was an expansion of the

    Original URL path: http://www.doaks.org/library-archives/garden-archives/drawings-and-photographs-by-garden-area/herbaceous-border/about-the-herbaceous-border (2016-02-18)
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  • Drawings — Dumbarton Oaks
    Herbaceous Border Plan and elevation for Herbaceous Border walls to replace yew hedges 1 Plan and elevation for Herbaceous Border walls to replace yew hedges 2 Preliminary study for plan and elevations of Herbaceous Border walls 2 Plan and elevation for Herbaceous Border walls to replace yew hedges 3 Finial behind Mr Yew seat 1 Finial behind Mr Yew seat 2 Planting plan for Herbaceous Border 1928 1943 Gate between

    Original URL path: http://www.doaks.org/library-archives/garden-archives/drawings-and-photographs-by-garden-area/herbaceous-border/drawings (2016-02-18)
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  • About the House Exteriors — Dumbarton Oaks
    and detail of the pre existing house and integrated it with the newly designed gardens She paid particularly close attention to the size and spread of the plants she chose watching carefully so that greenery never overwhelmed or obscured important details of the building These calculations took into account not only the height of shrubs and bushes but also the size and color of their foliage In the Plant Book she said that evergreens of dark bluish green shades are suggested rather than those of yellow or brownish greens Magnolia and rhododendron should be avoided because their large leaves would look coarse and clumsy 3 The plants she chose which included hemlock ivy and boxwood were strategically placed to mask unwanted features of the house like the basement windows Other plantings enhanced existing lines colors and design elements of the building On the entrance steps Farrand recommended a carefully balanced amount of clinging vine to help age and soften the balustrade Along the walls of the house she suggested that climbing ivy cover no more than one third of the brick The integration of greenery with the hardscape of the house helped to soften the mansion s façade and gave

    Original URL path: http://www.doaks.org/library-archives/garden-archives/drawings-and-photographs-by-garden-area/house-exteriors/about-the-house-exteriors (2016-02-18)
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  • About the House Interiors — Dumbarton Oaks
    repair and renovation Beyond the necessary cosmetic changes the Blisses plans for the estate required major construction work They hired architects and artists to help build beautify and furnish their home First Frederick Brooke and then later McKim Mead White were responsible for building additions to the mansion Armand Albert Rateau Allyn Cox and Samuel Yellin contributed to beautiful interior spaces Beatrix Farrand also provided plans for interior ornaments and furniture Although the mansion was not a garden area Mildred Bliss so trusted and valued Farrand s artistic vision that she commissioned her landscape architect to create items for the house Farrand continued to advise even after the building became a Harvard University institution After 1940 Farrand consulted on the storage of books the layout and furnishing of office space and the possible conversion of the Orangery into a visitors center Because of her involvement in the Blisses interior decorating as well as the functioning of the house after 1940 the Garden Archives contain drawings photographs and correspondence that pertain to interior non garden spaces In general the history of the house can be found in the Dumbarton Oaks House Collection Researchers interested in more information are encouraged to visit

    Original URL path: http://www.doaks.org/library-archives/garden-archives/drawings-and-photographs-by-garden-area/house-interiors/about-the-house-interiors (2016-02-18)
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  • Drawings — Dumbarton Oaks
    F S horizontal section through shell Hall console F S D end elevation Hall console F S D direct side elevation of leg Hall console F S D 1 2 plan of marble top 1 Hall console F S D 1 2 plan of marble top 2 Hall console F S D front elevation Hall console F S D 1 2 plan of iron frame under marble top looking up

    Original URL path: http://www.doaks.org/library-archives/garden-archives/drawings-and-photographs-by-garden-area/house-interiors/drawings (2016-02-18)
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  • About the Kitchen Gardens — Dumbarton Oaks
    kitchen garden was especially important to Farrand s design as she saw the beautiful yet utilitarian space as unifying the whole scheme of terraces house and wilderness Her first drawings divided the space into a grape arbor frame yard espaliered fruit trees and vegetable garden to the east with an arboretum to the west and a north south walkway cutting down the center A flower cutting garden eventually replaced the arboretum as the western side of the kitchen garden proved too small for a proper arboretum During the years of Bliss residence the kitchen garden provided flowers for the house and fruit and vegetables for the estate It began as an economical set up but in the 1940s the transition to Harvard necessitated a change A reduced garden staff as well as better prices for market produce prompted Dumbarton Oaks Director John Thacher to begin plans to discontinue the vegetable garden After consultation with Mildred Bliss and Beatrix Farrand he made the decision final in 1944 However before removing the vegetables altogether the kitchen garden served for two years 1942 43 as a model Victory Garden to help the war effort The frame yard was also suppressed in 1949 which opened much of the kitchen gardens up for redesign In the 1950s Mildred Bliss commissioned Robert Patterson to draw plans for new garden rooms that could replace the empty vegetable garden and frame yard Patterson drew designs for a fragrant Garden for the Blind and a Byzantine Garden but neither design was ever realized Among other reasons the kitchen garden site proved particularly unsuitable for the Garden for the Blind due to its extreme remoteness After almost sixty years of serving other purposes the vegetable garden returned to vegetables in 2009 and has been replanted successfully each year since by

    Original URL path: http://www.doaks.org/library-archives/garden-archives/drawings-and-photographs-by-garden-area/kitchen-gardens/about-the-kitchen-gardens (2016-02-18)
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  • Drawings — Dumbarton Oaks
    Kitchen Garden houses and toilet room Door to wash house Iron handles for the Kitchen Garden houses doors 1 Iron handles for the Kitchen Garden houses doors 2 Handle for Kitchen Garden houses doors Rafter ends for Kitchen Garden houses Kitchen Garden stairs Kitchen Garden stairs full size details New roof for houses in Kitchen Garden New roof Kitchen Garden wash house Weathervane for tool house front elevation Weathervane for

    Original URL path: http://www.doaks.org/library-archives/garden-archives/drawings-and-photographs-by-garden-area/kitchen-gardens/drawings (2016-02-18)
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