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  • Drawings — Dumbarton Oaks
    Home Contents Index Search Refine Help Drawings Info Drawings Apple Orchard and arbor planting plan with plant list 1960 Seat niche in Orchard Full size finial for arbor in Orchard Full size drawing flag for seat niche in Orchard Typical section of Goat Trail path Document Actions Print this Share Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection 1703 32nd Street NW Washington DC 20007 Site Map Web Accessibility Contact Us Visit

    Original URL path: http://www.doaks.org/library-archives/garden-archives/drawings-and-photographs-by-garden-area/orchard/drawings (2016-02-18)
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  • About the Pebble Garden — Dumbarton Oaks
    Photographs show that it served as a staging area for large construction projects but games of tennis happened rarely When Dumbarton Oaks transitioned from a private home to a research institution gameplay became even more infrequent In 1947 landscape architect Robert Patterson and director John Thacher discussed removing the Tennis Court entirely At that time Dumbarton Oaks was searching for a potential site for a Garden Center and library Robert Patterson drew plans for placing the new building on the former Tennis Court site and an architect even came out to survey and make estimates However the Garden Center never materialized The problem of the Tennis Court rested until Mildred Bliss revisited it in the late 1950s In 1957 she took a trip to Italy where she visited the Villa I Tatti there she saw Cecil Pinsent s black and white pebble mosaic terrace which may have inspired her to try such a design at Dumbarton Oaks Upon returning Mildred Bliss set Ruth Havey to replace the old Tennis Court with a pebble mosaic Havey worked on the drawings and designs from 1959 to 1963 She planned a curving limestone parterre outlining beds of thyme and sedum In the center was a pebble mosaic of multi colored stone chosen by Mildred Bliss The stone came from a Mexican beach 100 miles south of Los Angeles Havey framed the terrace at the north with a large rococo fountain and pool and at the south with a large mosaic wheat sheaf surrounded by stone cornucopia In the paving beneath the wheat sheaf she placed the Bliss family motto Quod Severis Metes On the fountain wall Havey crafted a rocaille backdrop of cast stone in a pattern similar to the one Beatrix Farrand chose for the swimming pool terrace in 1931 In front

    Original URL path: http://www.doaks.org/library-archives/garden-archives/drawings-and-photographs-by-garden-area/pebble-garden/about-the-pebble-garden (2016-02-18)
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  • Drawings — Dumbarton Oaks
    for the Tennis Court parterre 2 Preliminary study for the Tennis Court fountain plan Preliminary study for the Tennis Court fountain front elevation Preliminary study for the Tennis Court fountain rear elevation Preliminary study for the Tennis Court fountain side elevation Preliminary study for the Tennis Court fountain section looking west Preliminary study for the Tennis Court fountain section at D looking north Preliminary study 2 plan of fountain for Tennis Court parterre Preliminary study 2 fountain for Tennis Court parterre elevation of north side of pool Preliminary study 2 fountain for Tennis Court parterre section on line A A looking north Preliminary study 2 fountain for Tennis Court parterre section through N S center line looking east Study for a Doria basin and pedestal for the merchild lead fountain figure at the north side of the Tennis Court fountain Plan of doria basin for merchild Full size front elevation doria basin under merchild tennis court fountain Full size plan doria basin under merchild Tennis Court fountain 1 Full size plan doria basin under merchild Tennis Court fountain 2 Dynamic frame for the layout of the Tennis Court parterre Dynamic frame for the layout of the major and minor scrolls

    Original URL path: http://www.doaks.org/library-archives/garden-archives/drawings-and-photographs-by-garden-area/pebble-garden/drawings (2016-02-18)
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  • About the Plum Walk — Dumbarton Oaks
    The wooden gates were constructed in a herringbone pattern topped with lead bird finials A robin quail cardinal and mockingbird finial topped the two gates at the southern end The northernmost gate opening onto Cherry Hill featured a wooden owl Farrand lined the path with yew hedges a continuation of the yew hedges begun in the Herbaceous Border From the Bird Walk staff could enter the Cutting Garden to the west and Vegetable Garden to the east It was a very utilitarian walkway The bird topped gates rotted significantly by the 1940s At this time Farrand drew up a series of plans for transitioning the many yew and box hedges in the gardens to hardscape which would require little maintenance She included the Bird Walk in her redesign and she removed the rotted gates and recommended the hedges be eliminated as well In 1954 the hedges were finally uprooted A double row of plum trees took its place mimicking the double hornbeam hedge recently planted in the Ellipse The new plantation of plums completely changed the scale and feel of the walkway by raising the visual screen to eye level The plums were tightly spaced and pruned for a canopy

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  • Historic Photographs — Dumbarton Oaks
    through trees 1 Plum Walk looking north through trees 2 Plum walk looking north through trees 3 Plum walk looking north through trees in bloom Plum Walk looking north with early blooming trees Plum Walk people in walk and trees in bloom Prunus Walk Dumbarton Oaks Washington D C 20007 Plum Walk view from beside Ellipse Plum Walk detail of blossoms Document Actions Print this Share Dumbarton Oaks Research Library

    Original URL path: http://www.doaks.org/library-archives/garden-archives/drawings-and-photographs-by-garden-area/plum-walk/historic-photographs (2016-02-18)
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  • R Street — Dumbarton Oaks
    Garden Archives Drawings and Photographs by Garden Area R Street Archive Navigation Garden Archives Home Contents Index Search Refine Help R Street Info R Street About R Street Drawings Historic Photographs Document Actions Print this Share Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection 1703 32nd Street NW Washington DC 20007 Site Map Web Accessibility Contact Us Visit Us Staff Directory Employment Rights and Reproductions Staff Login Newsletter Webmail Service Desk 2014

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  • About R Street — Dumbarton Oaks
    Lovers Lane In 1921 Robert Bliss filed for a permit to build a new retaining wall at the eastern end of his property near Lovers Lane George Burnap the landscape architect at that time drew up plans for a five foot tall wall that would mimic the Linthicum stone wall in the west Burnap left the project without breaking ground and Frederick H Brooke picked up the task Brooke made new plans to simply encase the original stone in brick veneer remove the iron fence along R Street and unify everything in brick In 1923 Brooke was replaced with McKim Mead White and Beatrix Farrand Farrand took on the wall work adding the signature latticework that runs along the top of the present brick wall The design she chose is very similar to walls designed by Edwin Lutyens for residences in England Inside the wall Farrand thickly planted trees and shrubs to provide a privacy barrier between the gardens and the busy street Trailing vines were trained to drape over the wall and intertwine with the lattice After the initial construction and planting at R Street was complete very few major changes occurred Between 1931 and 1934 Farrand designed the

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  • About the Rose Garden — Dumbarton Oaks
    north Red and pink roses she relegated to the cutting gardens The rose beds were lined with low boxwood borders and smaller box bushes provided points of interest between the beds At the center of the terrace a tall spiral cut boxwood towered 15 feet over the rose beds that radiated out from the center Along the balustrades and retaining walls Farrand planted creeping vines and scented climbing roses The hybrid roses in the color graded beds were chosen for their hue and most were scentless so the border vines provided the only fragrance in the garden The Rose Garden quickly became Robert and Mildred Bliss s favorite garden room It also became a very special space for the couple as they filled the terrace with personal details In 1932 they placed a Doria stone bench in the eastern wall overlooking the fountain terrace The Bliss family motto Quod Severis Metes was carved into the back The shape and detail of the bench was probably inspired by similar designs found in Gertrude Jekyll s Garden Ornament published in 1918 The ornamentation along the top of the bench featured the Bliss family crest a sheaf of wheat and heraldic crests belonging to both the Woods and Bliss families Ruth Havey worked on the design between 1938 and 1952 during which time the details underwent various stages of revision Photographs exist of previous iterations of the bench design most notably a mock up of seated dog finials These were replaced with the current obelisk shape which was itself updated to a larger scale in the 1950s Directly across the garden set into the western retaining wall the Blisses placed another Doria bench covered by a lead baldacchino For seven years Mildred Bliss Beatrix Farrand and Ruth Havey worked together to design a

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