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  • About the Service Court — Dumbarton Oaks
    would provide them with opportunities to ride without the need to maintain stables on their estate However removing the stables completely imbalanced White s quadrangle leaving a gaping hole in the entire scheme To make matters worse White had recently completed detailed and finalized drawings for the stable In early May White wrote to Beatrix Farrand saying that loss of the stables was upsetting to say the least and I am in despair He added that he had no idea how to resolve the imbalanced courtyard A solution only presented itself when in early 1925 the Home for the Incurables was finally demolished This pre Bliss era institution had remained on the hill south of the planned Service Court awaiting the resolution of legal issues before Robert Bliss could take control of the building When his ownership of the empty building and surrounding grounds was finalized Bliss ordered the building removed The brick was reused in the construction of the Gardener s or Superintendent s Cottage and White slated the garage to be built in the newly available space No longer stymied by the loss of the stables construction began in 1925 The finalized Service Court layout featured a driveway leading past the Cottage on S Street down a hill to an open courtyard surrounded by the Garage in the south Cool House in the west and a 18 th century garden style greenhouse in the north A fence enclosed the courtyard on the east with a gate providing staff access into the gardens Other minor construction projects introduced the Tool House Wood Shed and Cold Frames Although the Service Court was never intended to be open to the public the plantings were still of paramount importance Along the service drive Beatrix Farrand placed trees to screen the working space

    Original URL path: http://www.doaks.org/library-archives/garden-archives/drawings-and-photographs-by-garden-area/service-court/about-the-service-court (2016-02-18)
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  • About the South Lawn — Dumbarton Oaks
    first visit Beatrix Farrand wrote to Mildred Bliss and described how the rolling tree filled lawn reminded her of the large ample old half city half country houses which one associates with certain districts in England and France and to a certain extent in our own south This feeling of city country and European estate set the tone for her work in the rest of the garden The privacy afforded by the oaks was one of the reasons Robert and Mildred Bliss purchased the property To increase the visual screen between the house and road Farrand interspersed evergreens with the oaks along the wall Maintaining that barrier as well as the wooded lawn became more difficult in later years when Farrand wrote the Plant Book in the 1940s many of the original oaks had died At that time the remaining oaks were almost all over 100 years old and in fragile health In the Plant Book Farrand recommended planting small oaks densely along the borders of the lawn giving the new trees time to fill in the screen of greenery before the last of the original oaks could fail In the 1950s and 1960s most of the remaining oaks had

    Original URL path: http://www.doaks.org/library-archives/garden-archives/drawings-and-photographs-by-garden-area/south-lawn/about-the-south-lawn (2016-02-18)
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  • About the Star Garden — Dumbarton Oaks
    and privacy Robert and Mildred Bliss used the Star Garden as an outdoor dining area for small intimate groups and they infused its design with details that reflected the personal nature of the space The focus of this garden area is on ornament rather than plant material The Star Garden or Zodiac Court as it was sometimes called gained its name from the astrological motifs Mildred Bliss chose to highlight in the garden ornaments and inscriptions The garden space is defined by hedges of white Rhododendron mucronatum Azalea indica alba on the east and north The house borders on the south and a low stone wall encloses the west The western wall features a fountain embellished with a lead design of Aquarius Water pours from the Aquarius figure into a yellow marble basin which is matched with a yellow marble table on the opposite side of the garden room The zodiac theme carries throughout the other elements of the Star Garden Farrand created an iron framed table and chairs with intricate designs set into the backs featuring representations of the constellations Orion Cepheus and Boötes Lead patterns set into the paving depict Aries Capricorn Pegasus and the Phoenix These constellations surround the paving design of a star within a corona all encircled by an excerpt from Chaucer The quote is set in stylized lead letters reading O thou maker of the whele that bereth the sterres and tornest the hevene with a ravishing sweigh Beatrix Farrand and Mildred Bliss worked together to choose and abridge this quotation from the opening line of Metre V Book I of Chaucer s translation of Boethius s Consolation of Philosophy Minor changes have come and gone in the Star Garden over time The Orion Cepheus and Boötes chairs appeared at the Terrior Column for

    Original URL path: http://www.doaks.org/library-archives/garden-archives/drawings-and-photographs-by-garden-area/star-garden/about-the-star-garden (2016-02-18)
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  • About the Superintendent's Cottage — Dumbarton Oaks
    and landscape architect Beatrix Farrand The service buildings were drafted and constructed in 1923 1928 and the cottage is the only one that was not designed by Lawrence Grant White Because White was traveling in Europe for a time his partner at the firm William Mitchell Kendall drew the plans for the cottage In 1923 Mildred Bliss suggested to her architects that they build a duplex to house the butler and the head gardener William Gray and his family Following her suggestion they planned the small gabled house to be a part of the Service Court Quadrangle However when the Blisses withdrew their request for a stable Lawrence Grant White was forced to revise the layout of the courtyard As a result the construction site for the cottage was moved to its current location on S Street Beatrix Farrand consulted on the design and layout of the house interiors as well as the surrounding gardens She suggested the low brick wall topped with an iron fence which separates the house from the street In the yard Farrand planted an evergreen hedge inside the wall Ivy crept over the wall and up the exterior of the house as well The central panel was planted to grass but due to heavy shade thrown by the surrounding elms in her Plant Book for Dumbarton Oaks she suggested that the lawn be graveled over The gravel and the elms were both gone by the mid 1960s The backyard simply housed the cold frames and was a utilitarian rather than designed space Upon construction of the Research Library in 2007 the backyard was truncated and paved to create a path up the steep slope around the cottage to S Street The cottage has housed many different people over the years William Gray James Bryce and

    Original URL path: http://www.doaks.org/library-archives/garden-archives/drawings-and-photographs-by-garden-area/superintendents-cottage/about-the-superintendents-cottage (2016-02-18)
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  • About the Swimming Pool and Loggia — Dumbarton Oaks
    French design elements One of the first major changes in 1927 involved lengthening the pool extending it west The western retaining wall of the pool area proved a particular challenge for Beatrix Farrand In addition to providing support and decoration the wall needed to distract the eye from the higher elevation of the North Vista landscape in the distance Farrand knew a straight horizontal wall would exaggerate the awkward drop between the North Vista and pool Between 1929 and 1931 she experimented with various mock ups testing silhouettes and textures for the final design After toying with the idea of a lattice finish Farrand settled on a curved Rococo cast stone wall with cream colored rocaille ornamentation Into the high central arch she placed a fountain with a red marble basin to catch the falling water The pool at the base of the basin was planted with blue nymphae water lilies during the 1930s The other plantings along the western wall served to soften the lines of land and ornament Creeping vines draped over parts of the rocaille wall and two Weeping Higan Cherries Prunus subhirtella framed the fountain from above Frederick Brooke s original bathhouse also underwent serious changes Architect Lawrence Grant White and Beatrix Farrand worked together and transformed the building into an Italian style Loggia They added windows wooden doors and an intricate cut limestone paving design that carried around the pool The artist Allyn Cox 1896 1982 painted colorful canvas frescoes for the interior walls and ceiling of the Loggia Cox the painter responsible for the murals in the rotunda of the U S Capitol chose the myth of Diana and Actaeon for his canvas frescoes Unfortunately his work almost immediately deteriorated due to the damp environment Cox attempted to repair the paintings but in 1948

    Original URL path: http://www.doaks.org/library-archives/garden-archives/drawings-and-photographs-by-garden-area/swimming-pool-and-loggia/about-the-swimming-pool-and-loggia (2016-02-18)
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  • Drawings — Dumbarton Oaks
    Search Refine Help Drawings Info Drawings West end of swimming pool 1 West end of swimming pool 2 Paving south of tennis court and east of loggia 1 Paving south of tennis court and east of loggia 2 Pergola paving sketch B Paving at foot of horseshoe steps Paving plan for pool west of swimming pool Paving at north west corner of swimming pool Plan for paving southwest end of swimming pool 1 Plan for paving southwest end of swimming pool 2 Sketch plan for paving SW of swimming pool Proposed design for stonework swimming pool balcony paving scheme A Proposed design for stonework balcony paving scheme B Proposed design for stonework balcony paving 1 Proposed design for stonework balcony paving 2 Proposed design for stonework balcony paving 3 Proposed design for stonework balcony paving 4 Suggestion for paving for swimming pool balcony Swimming pool coping Northeast corner of loggia 1 East and west elevations section for loggia North elevation of loggia 1 Loggia plan Loggia details North elevation of loggia 2 Next 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 9 Document Actions Print this Share Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection 1703 32nd Street NW Washington DC 20007 Site

    Original URL path: http://www.doaks.org/library-archives/garden-archives/drawings-and-photographs-by-garden-area/swimming-pool-and-loggia/drawings (2016-02-18)
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  • Historic Photographs — Dumbarton Oaks
    Historic Photographs Info Historic Photographs Swimming Pool before enlarging Swimming Pool view northwest Swimming Pool and Loggia view southeast 1 Swimming Pool and Loggia view southeast 2 Swimming Pool and Loggia view southeast 3 Swimming Pool and Loggia view southeast 4 Swimming Pool and Loggia view southeast 5 Swimming Pool and Loggia view southeast 6 Swimming Pool and Loggia view southeast 7 Swimming Pool and Loggia with lattice view southeast Swimming Pool and Loggia with lattice view south Swimming Pool Loggia with lattice and west wall Swimming Pool west end view from Green Garden Swimming Pool east end view from Green Garden Horseshoe Steps view south 1 Horseshoe Steps view south 2 Horseshoe Steps mock up for fountain pool 1 Horseshoe Steps mock up for fountain pool 2 Horseshoe Steps mock up for fountain pool 3 Horseshoe Steps mock up for fountain pool 4 Horseshoe Steps mock up for fountain pool 5 West end of Loggia and Horseshoe Steps 1 West end of Loggia and Horseshoe Steps 2 Horseshoe Steps shell fountain 1 Horseshoe Steps shell fountain 2 Next 1 2 3 4 5 Document Actions Print this Share Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection 1703 32nd Street NW Washington

    Original URL path: http://www.doaks.org/library-archives/garden-archives/drawings-and-photographs-by-garden-area/swimming-pool-and-loggia/historic-photographs (2016-02-18)
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  • About the Terrior Column and Enclosure — Dumbarton Oaks
    brick walk terminating the Fountain Terrace s southern vista A screen of bamboo the East Lawn and brick walls along Lover s Lane and R Street provide a backdrop to the Terrior Column and its surroundings The Terrior Column and enclosure was planned as a small quiet space for reading and resting outside of the heavily trafficked garden rooms Mildred Bliss brought the idea for the Italian column and enclosure back with her from a visit to Naples where she viewed the original and admired its romantic backstory During the Napoleonic Wars a French Admiral fell in love with a Neapolitan girl Separated by a language barrier the Admiral won the girl over by visiting her often and bringing gifts On one occasion he brought her a little pet terrier The girl referred to the dog in broken English as her little terrior and the misnomer stuck When the dog died she built a monument over its grave which the Neapolitans called the Terrior s Tomb Mildred Bliss replicated the pillar and pedestal of the monument at Dumbarton Oaks and it marked the central feature of the Terrior enclosure Surrounding the column Beatrix Farrand placed an arched wire bower planted with sweet autumn clematis winter jasmine and English ivy Tall bamboo which died back during the winters framed the space and provided a sense of separation from the rest of the garden In 1935 36 Farrand designed original furniture specifically for the Terrior Column The highlight was a French Rococo swinging seat with lead canopy and metalwork featuring engraved animals from Aesop s fables The lead figures mimicked similar designs in the animal cages in the 18 th century zoo at Versailles Other furniture included benches a chair and table and a table bench of Doria stone Some time after

    Original URL path: http://www.doaks.org/library-archives/garden-archives/drawings-and-photographs-by-garden-area/terrior-column-and-enclosure/about-the-terrior-column-and-enclosure (2016-02-18)
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