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  • St. Peter & Paul Rocks - DXCC Einheiten - Dokumentationsarchiv Funk (QSL Collection) [ENGLISH VERSION]
    1968 Team PY7AKW PY7AOD PY7ACQ PY7ABU PY7AKQ PY7PO Credit pictures ext Link back login 2000 2016 Dokumentationsarchiv Funk Intern Kuratorium QSL Collection DXCC Entities Afghanistan Aldabra Amsterdam Islands Auckland Campbell NZL Subantarctis Isl Bhutan Cocos Island Desecheo Dutch East India Glorioso Kermadec Kingman Reef Navassa Malpelo Neutral Zones North Korea Palestine Middle East Pratas St Brandon Agalega St Peter Paul Rocks Swain s Island Scarborough Reef Sikkim South Orkney Sudan

    Original URL path: http://dokufunk.org/amateur_radio/dxcc_entities/index.php?CID=9630&ID=11032 (2016-02-01)
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  • St. Peter & Paul Rocks - DXCC Einheiten - Dokumentationsarchiv Funk (QSL Collection) [ENGLISH VERSION]
    rocky outcropping the original location was regularly inundated by huge waves at high tide We ended up installing our 80 10 m vertical in a shallow crater instead of the planned tip of a dock The dock was being used by research divers By the way the antenna in the crater gets out very well as the bottom is always covered by 10 to 20 cm of salt water We cannibalized our Garden Beam Yagi for materials for the 10 m vertical as the place it was planned to be installed is now being worked on by a Brazilian Navy construction crew Instead of being able to locate our RX antennas on the remote rock of Cabral where I had no problem landing in July we had to locate our RX antennas on top of Belmonte Cabral being pounded by 5 meter waves that often was over it around the clock Our current operations are strongly influenced by the need to work around the local RF noise the very limited space and the need to continuously repair antennas Also because the Internet service of the research station which we were planning to rely on is down we have to spend 3 to 4 hours every day to get the logs uploaded through a 2 4 kbps low availability satellite link One of those LEO s On the other hand we have two stations on the air virtually all the time while a 10 and 6 meter station is on the air about 12 hours a day We now have over 30 000 QSO s in the log including 2400 on 160 and 800 on 6 Please keep in mind there are only the four of us Low Bands 160 Noise was OK this time but conditions were mediocre We were on 160 early in the evening a few times for an hour each during the night and just before our sunrise No JA s At other times we were using Station One to work JA s and others on 40 and 30 meters 80 The band started off very poorly but conditions improved later during the night No JA s this morning 40 The band was open all night to EU and NA with strong signals Both in the earlier part of the night and for a few hours around SR it was also open to JA with some very big and stable signals JH1GNU George AA7JV Sleepy Operators Chocolate and Coke Running Out 11 19 2012 from AA7JV Nov 19 2012 SPSP The waves just never stop The 10 m vertical got swamped again this time we have filled the gamma match capacitor with Teflon grease No salt water can get in there anymore Also the CAT5 control cable to the main antenna tuner got shredded by the strong wave action at high tide and the sharp rocks it was laid over The cable was replaced and suspended this morning We got buried a few times by some large waves as we did the job at high tide we did not want to lose the time waiting for low tide Low and high tides alternate approximately every 6 hours The tidal range on SPSP is about 2 5 meters We are all suffering from a lack of sleep It is no longer just me others are starting to fall asleep at the key We also ran our Coke now munching on instant coffee powder to stay awake Chocolate and other treats have been long gone It is not that we did not plan sufficiently but we are sharing with our Brazilian Navy friends their facility and our stuff Last night we concentrated on Japan on 30 and 40 meters We feel that it is better to make actual contacts than chase elusive openings on 160 meters One aspect of the location is that most bands are open to both Europe and North America at the same time This results in huge and very difficult to manage pile ups Also a lot of Europeans feel that we favor NA while some North American stations believe that we favor Europe For the record the QSO counts are about even maybe one or two percent in favor of EU If we could we would favor Japan and East Asia as this is a very difficult QSO for them especially on the low bands but we cannot get enough openings to really make a difference Low Bands 160 We spent only a couple of hours on 160 Noise was high We were not on 160 at our SR 80 The band was also suffering from atmospheric noise A front passed through late yesterday afternoon and early this morning with its associated lightning activity 40 Forty meters was in excellent shape last night and that is where we focused our energies And on 30 Signals were strong from both Europe and NA Later around our SR we were able to work a lot of JA s Their signals however were very fluttery and difficult to copy George AA7JV Nov 16 2012 SPSP We have started RTTY operations We have three stations running most of the time We now have around 17 000 QSO s including 1800 on 160 Winds have increased to 25 kts and continuing large waves and swells make it impossible to install antennas on the remote rocks On the other hand we have installed a new low band antenna that is proving to be very useful Our main challenge continues to be the very limited Internet access Log updates are very difficult to send Logs need to be broken into small enough segments which must be individually compressed into files of around 15 kbytes each On some days we end up with 14 or 15 log update messages Once these are ready to go I have to climb to the top of Belmont a steep rocky climb set up the computer and the sat phone and wait for a good satellite

    Original URL path: http://dokufunk.org/amateur_radio/dxcc_entities/index.php?CID=9630&ID=11101 (2016-02-01)
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  • Auckland & Campbell / NZL Subantarctis Isl. - DXCC Einheiten - Dokumentationsarchiv Funk (QSL Collection) [ENGLISH VERSION]
    and Macquarie Islands Visits to the islands declined although recovering seal populations allowed a modest revival in sealing in the mid 1820s Now uninhabited the islands saw unsuccessful settlements in the mid 19th century In 1842 a small party of Māori from the Chatham Islands migrated to the archipelago surviving for some 20 years on sealing and flax growing Samuel Enderby s grandson Charles Enderby proposed a community based on agriculture and whaling in 1846 This settlement established at Port Ross in 1849 and named Hardwicke lasted only two and a half years The Imperial Parliament at Westminster included the Auckland Islands in the extended boundaries of New Zealand in 1863 The 1907 Sub Antarctic Islands Scientific Expedition spent ten days on the islands conducting a magnetic survey and taking botanical zoological and geological specimens From 1941 to 1945 the islands hosted a New Zealand meteorological station Several introduced species have come to the islands ecologists eliminated or allowed to go extinct cattle sheep goats dogs possums and rabbits in the 1990s but feral cats pigs and mice remain on Auckland Island The last rabbits on Enderby Island were removed in 1993 through the application of poison also eradicating mice there Campbell Island was discovered in 1810 by Captain Frederick Hasselborough of the sealing brig Perseverance which was owned by shipowner Robert Campbell s Sydney based company Campbell Co whence the island s name Captain Hasselborough was drowned on 4 November 1810 in Perseverance Harbour The island became a seal hunting base and the seal population was almost totally eradicated The first sealing boom was over by the mid teens of the 19th century The second was a brief revival in the 1820s The whaling boom extended here in the 1830s and 40s In 1874 the island was visited by a French scientific expedition intending to view the Transit of Venus Much of the island s topography is named after aspects of or people connected with the expedition In the late 19th century the island became a pastoral lease Sheep farming was undertaken from 1896 until the lease with the sheep and a small herd of cattle was abandoned in 1931 as a casualty of the Great Depression In 1907 a group of scientists spent 8 days on the Island group surveying The 1907 Sub Antarctic Islands Scientific Expedition conducted a magnetic survey and also took botanical zoological and geological specimens During World War II a coastwatching station was operative at Tucker Cove at the north shore of Perseverance Harbour as part of the Cape Expedition program After the war the facilities were used as a meteorological station until 1958 when a new one was established at Beeman Cove just a few hundred metres further east now unmanned and fully automated Campbell Island has a maritime tundra climate with consistently cool cloudy wet and windy weather The island receives only 650 hours of bright sunshine annually and it can expect less than an hour s sunshine on 215 days 59

    Original URL path: http://dokufunk.org/amateur_radio/dxcc_entities/index.php?CID=11039&ID=11040 (2016-02-01)
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