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  • Which Is Fully Equipped With Water Cannons On Port Starboard Sides As Well As From The Bow Is A Fierce Battling Vessel There Is Also A Secret Water Cannon Hidden On The Bow Trickery Has Been Many Pirates Forte And Captain TAHJr Has A Bag Of Tricks Up His Sleeve He Is Sly Buccaneer Below Are Pictures That Captain TAJr Allowed Us To Take Of His Ship His Crew Members

    Original URL path: http://www.dryl.org/2010/A%20Pirate%20At%20Heart.htm (2016-04-25)
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  • Jersey Devil Sighted
    has it he beheaded one of his men to guard forever his buried treasure Accounts claim the headless pirate and the Jersey Devil became friends and were seen in the evenings walking along the Atlantic and in nearby marshlands In Clayton New Jersey the Devil was chased by a posse to the edge of a wooded area The Devil fled into the wood The posse afraid to pursue him halted and declared if you re the Devil rattle your chains The Devil s taste varies He was seen cavorting at sea with a mermaid in 1870 And he is reputed to have had a ham and egg breakfast with a Republican Judge French But the Devil is not known to have specific political leanings The Devil s sightings have covered great geographic distances from Bridgeton to Haddonfield in 1859 to the New York border in 1899 and from Gloucester City to Trenton in 1909 Until this time tales of the Devil were passed by word of mouth However published police and newspaper accounts during a famous week in January of 1909 took the story of the Devil from folk belief to authentic folk legend Thirty different sightings in a one week period told of the Devil sailing across the Delaware River to Maryland Pennsylvania and Delaware Newspaper articles created a near panic in the region Theory and the Devil After the 1909 appearances the scientific community was asked for possible explanations Reportedly science professors from Philadelphia and experts from the Smithsonian Institution thought the Devil to be a prehistoric creature from the Jurassic period Had the creature survived in nearby limestone caves Was it a pterodactyl or a peleosaurus New York scientists thought it to be a marsupial carnivore Was it an extinct fissiped However the Academy of Natural Sciences

    Original URL path: http://www.dryl.org/2007/History/jersey_devil_sighted.htm (2016-04-25)
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  • Tragic Ferry Disaster
    s most tragic events Walkers and riders Pedestrian traffic on the ice clogged river during the early 1800s was expected and it usually did not hinder the ferries Research at the Camden County Historical Society reveals that horses sometimes towed the ferries like sleds across the frozen river in winter To successfully glide across the Delaware the ferries had to be fitted with skids or runners on either side of their keels The ice wasn t always solid though When floating ice impeded the ferries boats with very sharp bows were pressed into service Extending from their bows was a platform where a worker would sit With boat hook in hand he would brace himself with his legs and feet and push the floating ice away Sometimes the ice was so bad that it would take a ferry from one to two hours to work around the floes and complete a crossing It was that type of manuver that led to the Camden tragedy Saturday March 15 1856 was a cold and windy day All day ice floes had floated down the river past Camden according to newspaper reports Some thought the broken ice was the promise of an early spring but there was nothing springlike about that day That evening nearly 100 people climbed aboard a ferry called the New Jersey in Philadelphia eager to get to their warm homes in Camden Sailing into darkness According to county historical documents and newspaper reports the ferry owned by the Philadelphia and Camden Steamboat Company left the Walnut Street wharf at 8 30 p m and sailed into the darkness toward Camden Documents show that Capt William S Corson of Camden was in command As he guided his vessel toward the channel heavy ice floes made it impossible to navigate so he turned the ferry upstream in search of another place to cross Moments later smoke poured from a spot on the deck near the smokestack When flames became visible passengers notified the captain and tried to put out the fire They grabbed buckets from the walls dipping them overboard filling them with water and then passing them forward to douse the flames In a desperate attempt to save the ferry Corson turned the boat around and tried to make it back to Philadelphia hoping to reach the dock before the fire raged out of control As the boat limped back flames swept across the upper deck and forced passengers to the windward side creating a bad list It was reported that the New Jersey came within 30 feet of the Philadelphia dock when the pilothouse collapsed in flames causing the boat to veer out of control Corson who reportedly survived watched as panic set in He saw women try in vain to beat out the flames that engulfed their long dresses and he saw men tear benches and chairs loose to help those who had jumped overboard He saw passengers leap into the frigid water and climb on top of

    Original URL path: http://www.dryl.org/2007/History/tragic_ferry_disaster.htm (2016-04-25)
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  • Finn
    Fort Delaware owned by the government from about 1837 was first fortified in 1814 when the British were coming and they put up an earthwork battery out there said R Hugh Simmons a member of the Fort Delaware Society and editor of the Fort Delaware Notes Fortunately he points out the British did not come or they would have had Philadelphia again In the early years of the Civil War some Confederate soldiers were confined to Fort Delaware and there were some burials there Simmons says there were few prisoners during the first two years of the war in comparison to the last two Simmons says the first mention of Confederate prisoners found in Fort Delaware Society records is from August 1861 But it was not until May 1863 when the federal government decided Fort Delaware would become a major POW camp that burial space was needed for the dozens of soldiers who were dying daily The fort was on the Delaware River which meant it could be reached from the Atlantic Ocean Through the nearby Delaware and Chesapeake Canal a short cut could be taken there from Baltimore and Fort McHenry Upstream was the railroad center in Philadelphia Simmons explained that the prison was built to house 10 000 POWs and the barracks were divided to hold about 2 000 officers and civilians in one compound and about 8 000 privates and enlisted men in the other So you had 3 800 Confederate prisoners suddenly appear on the doorsteps he says These guys were sick as dogs They were badly treated en route and the Union officers have testified to that When they arrived here they started dropping like flies Burial at Finns Point With little space on the island Soldiers Burial Ground at Finns Point was pressed into service There are 2 436 Confederates buried in seven parallel pits at Finns Point that run east to west Simmons explains They were buried in wooden coffins stacked three deep Names plates were put on each coffin and covered in leather for future identification But no records were kept and it was impossible to identify anyone after the war In 1875 the year the ground was designated a national cemetery the Corps of Engineers exhumed the remains of 135 Union soldiers and 187 Confederates on Pea Patch Island and reburied them at Finns Point Two major monuments have been erected to the fallen soldiers The Confederate monument was erected in 1910 The obelisk type monument is 85 feet tall and has eight brass plates two on all four sides which contain the names of the dead The Union monument was constructed in 1879 and bears the names of the 135 exhumed from the island According to records the prison camp on Pea Patch Island was not as bad as the one in Andersonville Ga where thousands of Union troops were badly mistreated and died During Andersonville s existence from February 1864 to May 1865 more than 45 000 Union solders

    Original URL path: http://www.dryl.org/Places/finn.htm (2016-04-25)
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  • Pennsbury Manor
    hired help and volunteers of the present day Pennsbury Manor make sure the three story manor house circa 1939 is free of rodent infestation and spick and span for the 25 000 pairs of feet that walk through during annual visits Sound easy Maybe if a week of cleaning windows dusting walls and 17th and 18th century artifacts buffing and waxing hardwood floors and vacuuming textiles and bed linens is a piece of cake Last year the yearly February cleaning took 147 hours according to Diane Reed a full time Pennsbury Manor staffer Reed said she spruces up the manor house weekly and monthly as needed but nothing comes close to the once a year top to bottom cleaning The floors for instance are transformed from dull brown hues to a reinvigorated high gloss shine with help from an orange container of butchers wax she said They used to polish bowling alleys with it Reed said It s all done by hand It takes three hours to dry and then we buff it To keep centuries old gold chandeliers wooden chests and old fashioned chairs in tip top shape curator Kim McCarty said staff and visitors follow the hands off

    Original URL path: http://www.dryl.org/2007/History/pennsbury_manor.htm (2016-04-25)
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  • Culpeper Ensign
    Tannaghmore Rural Community Group to stand shoulder to shoulder with others who along with them face the cosh of terrorism A spokesman for the Ladyhill and Tannaghmore Community Group said the area has traditionally been strong in Ulster Scots culture and heritage He said many people from the area have left and gone on to make a new life in America so the links with ourselves and our American cousins remain to this day He said Today when America and many other countries around the world have come under the cosh of terrorism the Ulsterman and woman can relate to the situation these countries find themselves in as many lives have been lost and tears shed during over 30 years of genocide against the Ulster people by Irish terrorists Ladyhill and Tannaghmore Rural Community Group want to stand shoulder to shoulder with our kinsfolk in their day of trouble and intend to fly this flag from July 4 American Independence Day until the end of Ulster s Twelfth celebrations The First Navy Jack is an American flag made up of 13 red and white stripes a picture of a moving rattle snake and bearing the inscription Don t Tread on Me An early version of the flag was first flown in America on February 1775 on the Delaware River More recently it has become the symbol of resistance by America against terrorism On May 31 2002 Gordon England secretary for the Department of the Navy in Washington DC issued a directive to ships and stations that they fly the First Navy Jack during the global war on terrorism Each ship and craft in the US Navy was issued with four flags per ship The Culpepper Ensign often referred to in error as a Navy Jack Subsequently there was a Naval

    Original URL path: http://www.dryl.org/2007/History/culpeper_ensign.htm (2016-04-25)
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  • Riverton Yacht Club
    the center of the building for carriages and freight to pass through The original fence on the second storey balustrade had a hole for a cannon for sailboat races The Burgee for the Riverton Yacht Club was designed and registered in 1865 after the Civil War and it was designed after the American Flag in the spirit of Patriotism a seldom used word nowadays and after it was made the

    Original URL path: http://www.dryl.org/2007/History/riverton_yacht_club.htm (2016-04-25)
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  • 476 foot Yacht Grille
    foot yacht Grille was dismantled and sent to the scrap heap in 1951 according to a Philadelphia Inquirer article on Thursday March 27 1997 The Grille was the private yacht of Adolph Hitler of Germany By the time the Grille passed under the Ben Franklin Bridge from the New York Navy yards to Doan Salvage in Florence it was floating junk An interesting part of the proud History of the

    Original URL path: http://www.dryl.org/2007/History/476_foot_yacht_grille.htm (2016-04-25)
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