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  • Solar for All | Environment New Jersey
    way so more Americans can go solar We re working with our national network to urge mayors governors and others to set ambitious solar goals and commitments offer new solar incentives and promote new community solar programs And we re mobilizing people to counter the utilities and other special interests who want to make solar more expensive and harder to install We re fighting attacks And we re winning In just the past year we ve turned back attacks on solar in Arizona Colorado and New Mexico and won new commitments to solar in Austin and Houston Athens and Atlanta and New York State and California among other places Over the last 10 years we ve helped establish dozens of pro solar programs including the biggest California s Million Solar Roofs Initiative What can you do We want you to join us by showing your support for solar You can send an email to your local officials write a letter to your local newspaper attend one of our solar forums or join us at a news conference or other special event Whatever you can do the time for action is now Solar is at a tipping point If we keep winning more pro solar policies we ll see millions more Americans go solar in the next decade putting us on a path to a 100 renewable future If we let utilities and other special interests get in the way that future will remain out of reach as solar sputters and stalls Together we can achieve Solar for All We can do this Together we can bring more solar power to our homes our communities our churches and schools our workplaces and our lives and leave a cleaner healthier world for kids growing up today and future generations Solar For All

    Original URL path: http://environmentnewjersey.org/programs/nje/solar-all?page=10 (2016-05-01)
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  • New Jersey Poised To Make History in the Race for Offshore Wind | Environment New Jersey
    more work to do if we hope to stay in the lead To get us over the finish line so we can start producing pollution free energy and creating local jobs from offshore wind development our leaders must act now first by demanding that Congress extend the offshore wind tax credit before it expires at the end of the year and second by finalizing an in state funding mechanism for offshore wind When it comes to the latter the Christie Administration is unfortunately over a year and a half late Our reliance on fossil fuels has destroyed some of our most precious landscapes is contributing to public health problems like asthma and heart attacks from dangerous air pollution is fueling global warming and is putting New Jersey s coastline at risk Offshore wind provides a cleaner way for New Jersey to meet its energy needs For years New Jersey s leaders have been laying the groundwork to ramp up offshore wind The U S Department of Interior s Smart from the Start initiative has identified an area off the coast of New Jersey in federal waters that is suitable for development and after a sound environmental and stakeholder review process has opened up the area to take lease proposals Developers have expressed interest on 11 proposals and leases will be granted through a competitive auction process In addition in July of this year Fisherman s Energy received its final permit for a 25 megawatt offshore wind project in state waters approximately three miles off the coast of Atlantic City For New Jersey offshore wind will be an important resource to help the state meet its goal of producing 22 5 percent of its electricity from renewable energy sources by 2021 New Jersey Audubon congratulates the National Wildlife Federation and the many partners who contributed to the production of this valuable report which calls for continued progress towards responsible offshore wind development in the Atlantic said Eric Stiles President and CEO of New Jersey Audubon We must move forward with appropriately sited offshore wind as a critical component of a broader strategy to mitigate climate change and protect our wildlife The Atlantic coast is an ideal location for appropriately sited offshore wind energy because of its high electricity demand and population density along the coast Along the Atlantic coast alone reaching the Department of Energy s DOE goal of 54 gigawatts of offshore wind power would reduce carbon pollution by the equivalent of taking roughly 18 million cars off the road Meeting this benchmark would also generate 200 billion in new economic activity while creating more than 43 000 permanent high paying jobs in manufacturing construction engineering operations and maintenance according to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory The broad base of support for offshore wind was demonstrated in late July when more than two hundred environmental organizations businesses and local and state officials from up and down the Atlantic coast wrote a letter to federal officials calling for bold action to

    Original URL path: http://environmentnewjersey.org/news/nje/new-jersey-poised-make-history-race-offshore-wind (2016-05-01)
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  • The Turning Point for Atlantic Offshore Wind Energy | Environment New Jersey
    energy generation off their shores New Jersey under the Christie Administration has specifically provided incentives for offshore wind development and investment This is precisely the type of leadership needed along the coast and at the federal level to jumpstart a robust offshore wind industry in America Governor O Malley has been pushing for a similar measure in Maryland which is expected to be considered by the state legislature in 2013 Nine states along the coast from Maine to Delaware have prioritized clean energy by requiring a certain percentage of the state s power be generated from renewable sources The New England Governors recently signed an agreement to pursue a coordinated strategy to purchase renewable energy Massachusetts Rhode Island and New Jersey have pursued critical research and planning efforts to facilitate sound siting decisions and similar efforts are underway in New York and Maryland Offshore Wind Energy Can Be Developed in a Manner that Protects Wildlife Europe has been producing energy from its offshore wind resources for over two decades and has been able to avoid and minimize many of the impacts to wildlife For example Danish research shows that birds have a strong tendency to avoid offshore wind energy turbines While conditions are different here in the U S initial research on birds bats sea turtles and marine mammals off our coast suggests that we can achieve the same result if leasing decisions are based on sound science and informed by key experts and stakeholders Specifically data shows that bird density is significantly lower in offshore environments farther from shore All energy sources have some impact on wildlife but research shows that appropriately sited and mitigated offshore wind energy is a much safer bet than fossil fuels A Thriving Offshore Wind Industry Will be an Economic Powerhouse for America America s wind industry currently employs over 75 000 people and research shows that approximately 300 000 jobs and over 200 billion in new economic activity could result from a robust American offshore wind industry In addition to supporting thousands of jobs to design construct and operate offshore wind energy projects substantial industrial manufacturing jobs will be needed to produce turbines foundations blades sub stations and cables along the coast Over 40 000 people are currently employed in the offshore wind industry in Europe with over 300 000 jobs expected by 2020 Offshore Wind Energy Can Provide Affordable Reliable Power When and Where We Need it Most America s immense offshore wind resource lies in close proximity to some of our biggest cities presenting an opportunity to utilize clean energy to meet the growing demand for power along the East Coast Offshore winds blow strongest during the day and at other times of peak demand such as heat waves as documented by real time wind monitors off Massachusetts and Rhode Island Plugging offshore wind into the grid will lead to lower more predictable energy prices over time For example the New York Independent System Operator has found that for every 1

    Original URL path: http://environmentnewjersey.org/reports/nje/turning-point-atlantic-offshore-wind-energy (2016-05-01)
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  • Broad Range of Stakeholders Call on Northeast Governors, Including Christie, to Improve Successful Clean Energy and Anti-Pollution Program | Environment New Jersey
    strengthen it is one of the best ways we can build on our state s progress on clean energy and on reduce the pollution that causes global warming Officials from nine of the ten RGGI states are currently evaluating options for improving the program as part of a review process established when the program was launched Currently New Jersey is no longer at the table as Governor Christie abandoned the program in December 2011 RGGI as it evolves is vital to addressing climate change New Jersey s withdrawal from RGGI is sinful and we call on the Governor to repent and to work with other states to strengthen RGGI for the future said Rev Fletcher Harper Executive Director of GreenFaith Independent analysis has shown that RGGI s impact on the economies of participating states has been positive adding 151 million to New Jersey s economy and creating 1 800 jobs New Jersey is missing out on creating new green jobs economic growth and pollution reductions because the Governor pulled out of RGGI at a time when our economy could use a shot in the arm and when people deserve a break on energy costs We are losing millions of dollars in funding for weatherization and energy efficiency We are losing out on thousands of jobs and the reduction of millions of tons of pollution These benefits are going to the other states in the region that are part of RGGI putting us at an economic disadvantage The Governor cannot have a Jersey comeback by pulling out of RGGI said Jeff Tittel Director of the NJ Sierra Club Initial projections have shown that updating the program s targets to deliver a 15 reduction in carbon dioxide pollution by 2020 would help address the health impacts of climate change and would avoid

    Original URL path: http://environmentnewjersey.org/news/nje/broad-range-stakeholders-call-northeast-governors-including-christie-improve-successful (2016-05-01)
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  • New Report: Extreme Rainstorms and Snowstorms Up 33 Percent in NJ | Environment New Jersey
    increases evaporation and enables the atmosphere to hold more water providing more fuel for extreme rainstorms and heavy snowstorms Elliott pointed to the recent rainstorms that hit Freehold and other parts of Monmouth County on July 28th 2012 as an illustration of what more extreme rainstorms and snowstorms could mean for the state That brought heavy rain and winds causing power outages for thousands in Central Jersey The new Environment New Jersey Research and Policy Center report When It Rains It Pours Global Warming and the Increase in Extreme Precipitation from 1948 to 2011 examines trends in the frequency of and the total amount of precipitation produced by extreme rain and snow storms across the contiguous United States from 1948 to 2011 Using data from 3 700 weather stations and a methodology originally developed by scientists at the National Climatic Data Center and the Illinois State Water Survey the report identifies storms with the greatest 24 hour precipitation totals at each weather station and analyzes when those storms occurred The report also examines trends in the amount of precipitation produced by the largest annual storm at each weather station Nationally the report found that storms with extreme precipitation increased in frequency by 30 percent across the contiguous United States from 1948 to 2011 Moreover the largest annual storms produced 10 percent more precipitation on average At the state level 43 states show a significant trend toward more frequent storms with extreme precipitation while only one state Oregon shows a significant decline Key findings for New Jersey and the region include Extreme rainstorms and snowstorms are becoming more frequent New Jersey experienced a 33 percent increase in the frequency of extreme rainstorms and snowstorms from 1948 to 2011 In other words heavy downpours or snowstorms that happened once every 12 months on average in 1948 now happen every 9 on average Storms with extreme precipitation increased in frequency by 85 percent in the Northeast region during the period studied The region ranks 1st nationwide for the largest increase in the frequency of storms with heavy precipitation The biggest rainstorms and snowstorms are getting bigger The amount of precipitation released by the largest annual storms in New Jersey increased by 22 percent from 1948 to 2011 Elliott was careful to note that an increase in the frequency and severity of extreme rainstorms does not mean more water will be available for human use Hotter temperatures fuel extreme rainstorms by increasing rates of evaporation At the same time however that evaporation increases soil dryness Moreover scientists expect that as global warming intensifies longer periods with relatively little precipitation will tend to mark the periods between heavy rainstorms As a result droughts are likely to become more frequent and severe in some regions of the United States Currently more than half of the lower United States is suffering through prolonged drought aggravated by the fact that the last six months have been the hottest January June period on record According to the most recent

    Original URL path: http://environmentnewjersey.org/news/nje/new-report-extreme-rainstorms-and-snowstorms-33-percent-nj (2016-05-01)
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  • When it Rains, it Pours | Environment New Jersey
    total amount of precipitation produced by the largest storm in each year at each station increased by 10 percent over the period of analysis on average across the contiguous United States This trend was most pronounced in New England and the Middle Atlantic Connecticut Delaware Massachusetts Maine New Hampshire New Jersey New York Pennsylvania and Vermont all saw the intensity of the largest storm each year increase by 20 percent or more The trend also occurred across the Midwest the South and the West In total 43 states experienced a statistically significant increase in the amount of precipitation produced by the largest annual rain or snow storm Only one Oregon recorded a significant decrease For full state data see Table A 4 on page 37 Global warming driven by pollution from the combustion of fossil fuels is helping to fuel the increasing severity of downpours The U S Global Change Research Program composed of a wide range of leading experts from the U S National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and universities called the increase in heavy downpours one of the clearest precipitation trends in the United States and linked the phenomenon to global warming in its report Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States The average temperature in the United States has increased by 2 F over the last 50 years Nine of the ten warmest years on record have occurred since 2000 Warmer temperatures increase evaporation and enable the air to hold more water Scientists have found that the water content of the atmosphere is now increasing at a rate of about 1 3 percent per decade The additional moisture loaded into the atmosphere by global warming provides more fuel for intense rainstorms and snowstorms Global warming will very likely drive future increases in extreme downpours with a wide range of harmful consequences Experts at the U S Global Change Research Program project that heavy downpours are very likely to become more frequent and more intense with further warming Heavy downpours that are now 1 in 20 year occurrences are projected to occur about every 4 to 15 years by the end of this century according to their report while producing 10 to 25 percent more precipitation per storm depending on location and on the scale of future emissions of global warming pollution Extreme rain and snowstorms can harm people and property primarily by increasing the risk of flooding In 2011 floods killed more than 100 people and caused more than 8 billion in damage to property and crops Bigger and heavier rainstorms and snowstorms will not necessarily lead to more water being available for ecosystems or human use Indeed scientists warn that some areas of the country may experience both heavier extreme rainstorms and more frequent and severe drought due to higher evaporation of soil moisture and longer dry spells between significant rainstorms To protect our communities our safety and our environment we must rapidly and substantially reduce pollution that causes

    Original URL path: http://environmentnewjersey.org/reports/nje/when-it-rains-it-pours (2016-05-01)
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  • Despite Record-Breaking Heat and Numerous Bad Air Days, Gov. Christie Vetoes Clean Air Bill | Environment New Jersey
    economy and the environment creating a win win for every resident of our state The governor s veto today moves us backward on economic growth and environmental protection with one swoop of his pen The governor s veto comes as New Jersey suffers under record heat and extreme weather conditions Already this year the state has experienced a number of heat waves 3 or more days where temperatures exceed 90 degrees and temperatures have hit record numbers in Newark Trenton and many other towns and cities across the state Extreme heat exacerbates New Jersey s air pollution problems already some of the worst in the nation The extreme weather we ve experienced this summer is uncomfortable for all of us But it s especially dangerous for the young the elderly and those who suffer from asthma and other chronic lung conditions because it makes our bad air pollution even more harmful said Elliott By signing this bill Governor Christie could have cut that air pollution from fossil fuel fired power plants and moved us forward on clean energy Instead he s put politics before public health and the environment The governor s action today means more air pollution more fossil fuels and less clean energy for New Jersey in the long run Earlier this week Governor Christie signed a bill designed to promote more solar energy for the state and subsequently touted his leadership on clean energy alternatives for New Jersey Soon after it was announced that his administration will slash funding for clean energy choosing instead to divert these funds to the state s general coffers On the heels of that announcement the governor then vetoed the bill to keep New Jersey in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative Actions speak louder than words Despite recent rhetoric by the Administration

    Original URL path: http://environmentnewjersey.org/news/nje/despite-record-breaking-heat-and-numerous-bad-air-days-gov-christie-vetoes-clean-air-bill (2016-05-01)
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  • NJ’s Solar Energy Economy Gets a Boost | Environment New Jersey
    S1925 A2966 that will help further grow New Jersey s successful and booming solar energy industry Governor Christie signed that bill today and Matt Elliott Environment New Jersey s Clean Energy Advocate issued the following statement Today we applaud the Legislature and the governor for supporting a bill to help New Jersey continue to be the nation s solar leader We are pleased that the measure passed both houses of the Legislature with overwhelming bi partisan support reflecting the people of New Jersey s strong support for clean renewable energy regardless of party affiliation And we applaud Governor Christie for signing the bill into law today Because of forward thinking policies passed by the Legislature and Republican and Democratic governors alike over the years New Jersey is one of the nation s leaders on solar power This bill continues that positive momentum Currently we have more solar per square mile than any other state in the nation with nearly 16 000 solar installations on homes and businesses across the state As a result solar is cutting harmful air pollution reducing our reliance on fossil fuels keeping more of our energy dollars here at home and creating thousands of local jobs This bill ensures the continued success of our state s solar economy Because of our remarkable success on solar to date we are building at a faster rate than ever anticipated As a result we ve seen an oversupply of solar credits on the market causing the value of those credits to plummet for homeowners and businesses The bill that the governor signed into law today would accelerate the state s solar requirements over the next few years driving up demand for the credits and helping to stabilize the solar market all while helping to bring twice as much solar

    Original URL path: http://environmentnewjersey.org/news/nje/nj%E2%80%99s-solar-energy-economy-gets-boost (2016-05-01)
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