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  • Environment New Jersey
    this March The drilling plan would have allowed drilling 90 miles from Cape May endangered the Jersey Shore and tarnished the President s climate legacy Read more PREV NEXT Report Environment New Jersey Wind Power for a Cleaner America As Hurricane Sandy and its aftermath prompt more New Jerseyans to call for action to tackle global warming and the rise in extreme weather Environment New Jersey released a new report that shows that New Jersey s current power generation from wind energy displaces as much global warming pollution as taking 2000 cars off the road per year A 2010 law passed by the Legislature and signed by Governor Christie will bring far more wind power to New Jersey over the next decade significantly reducing global warming pollution and cutting the state s reliance on fossil fuels Keep Reading News Release Environment New Jersey Wind Energy in New Jersey Will Prevent as Much Global Warming Pollution as Taking 376 482 Cars Off the Road Each Year As Hurricane Sandy and its aftermath prompt more New Jerseyans to call for action to tackle global warming and the rise in extreme weather Environment New Jersey released a new report today that shows that New Jersey s current power generation from wind energy displaces as much global warming pollution as taking 2000 cars off the road per year A 2010 law passed by the Legislature and signed by Governor Christie will bring far more wind power to New Jersey over the next decade significantly reducing global warming pollution and cutting the state s reliance on fossil fuels Keep Reading News Release Hurricane Sandy is the Worst Possible Wake Up Call This is the worst possible wake up call Our Shore communities are suffering unspeakable loss More than 2 million households lost power Tens of

    Original URL path: http://environmentnewjersey.org/home?page=21 (2016-05-01)
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  • Environment New Jersey
    Obama Administration to drill off the Atlantic Coast for oil and gas this March The drilling plan would have allowed drilling 90 miles from Cape May endangered the Jersey Shore and tarnished the President s climate legacy Read more PREV NEXT News Release Environment New Jersey On the Eve of Governor s Decision on Fracking Waste Ban Environment New Jersey Report Documents the Cost of Fracking Trenton Firing a new salvo in the ongoing debate over the gas drilling practice known as fracking Environment New Jersey Research Policy Center today released a report documenting a wide range of dollars and cents costs imposed by dirty drilling As documented in The Cost of Fracking fracking creates millions of dollars of health costs related to everything from air pollution to ruined roads to contaminated property Keep Reading News Release Environment New Jersey New Jersey Poised To Make History in the Race for Offshore Wind As the clock ticks down for Congress to extend critical tax credits for wind power a new report shows that with continued state and federal leadership New Jersey could be among the first states along the Atlantic seaboard with offshore wind farms Keep Reading Report Environment New Jersey The Turning Point for Atlantic Offshore Wind Energy As America struggles to revitalize our economy create jobs secure an energy independent future and protect our communities and wildlife from the dangers of climate change one energy source offers a golden opportunity to power our homes and businesses without creating more pollution Atlantic offshore wind Keep Reading News Release Environment New Jersey Final Green Light for Clean Cars Today the Obama administration finalized new clean car standards that will double the fuel efficiency of today s vehicles by 2025 drastically reducing emissions of carbon pollution and cutting oil use in New

    Original URL path: http://environmentnewjersey.org/home?page=22 (2016-05-01)
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  • Environment New Jersey
    Percent in NJ Just days a series of severe storms ripped through Central Jersey leading to severe rains and flooding that devastated the town of Freehold a new Environment New Jersey report confirms that extreme rainstorms and snowstorms are happening 33 percent more frequently in New Jersey since 1948 The Central Jersey storm followed a June 29th storm that brought high winds and rain to Southern Jersey now considered one of the most destructive and severe thunderstorms in the region s history 206 000 people in Atlantic Cumberland and Salem counties lost power following the June 29th storm Keep Reading Report Environment New Jersey Research and Policy Center When it Rains it Pours Just days a series of severe storms ripped through Central Jersey leading to severe rains and flooding that devastated the town of Freehold a new Environment New Jersey report confirms that extreme rainstorms and snowstorms are happening 33 percent more frequently in New Jersey since 1948 The Central Jersey storm followed a June 29th storm that brought high winds and rain to Southern Jersey now considered one of the most destructive and severe thunderstorms in the region s history 206 000 people in Atlantic Cumberland and Salem counties lost power following the June 29th storm Keep Reading News Release Environment New Jersey Despite Record Breaking Heat and Numerous Bad Air Days Gov Christie Vetoes Clean Air Bill Gov Christie has again vetoed a bill to continue New Jersey s participation in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative RGGI originally a 10 state program designed to reduce harmful power plant pollution make polluters pay for their emissions and invest those payments in local clean energy programs Gov Christie pulled the state from the program last December The New Jersey Legislature having received over 60 000 public comments in support

    Original URL path: http://environmentnewjersey.org/home?page=23 (2016-05-01)
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  • Benefits of the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative | Environment New Jersey
    consumers According to a recent study by Analysis Group RGGI s emission cap has caused an 0 7 percent increase in electricity bills an increase of less than one half of 1 percent of annual energy expenditures for New Jersey homes and businesses Those costs however will be more than made up for over time by reductions in energy consumption driven by RGGI programs According to Analysis Group RGGI s investments thus far will lead to average energy savings of 25 per residential customer across the Northeast In New Jersey total energy bill savings will amount to approximately 150 million Economic benefits RGGI is helping to fuel the transition to a clean energy economy in New Jersey RGGI has led to the installation of approximately 7 5 megawatts of solar energy in New Jersey and the creation of nearly 1 800 job years of employment in the state according to ENE Environment Northeast New Jersey can reap even greater benefits by simply staying in the program even if pollution allowance prices remain low Environment Even if pollution allowance prices remain at current low levels New Jersey would achieve significant emissions reductions by simply staying in RGGI and directing program revenues to clean energy programs By 2018 New Jersey will avoid 127 000 metric tons of carbon dioxide pollution annually the equivalent taking 24 300 of today s passenger vehicles off the road Consumer costs The cost of pollution allowances under RGGI is projected to remain low through 2018 Remaining in the program and investing revenues from the program in clean energy programs would eliminate demand for 461 gigawatt hours GWh of centrally generated electricity per year enough to power 52 000 typical New Jersey homes and reducing the need for costly investments in new generation and transmission capacity Economic benefits Remaining in RGGI would enable the state to install 100 MW of solar and 95 MW of combined heat and power capacity assuming the state continues its current practices of clean energy investment fueling continued growth in the state s clean energy economy By working with other Northeastern states to strengthen RGGI New Jersey can maximize the benefits of the program Environment By adjusting RGGI s emission cap to reflect real as opposed to projected 2009 emissions and doubling the reduction target to achieve a 20 percent reduction in emissions by 2020 the Northeastern states could reduce carbon dioxide emissions region wide by 31 million tons annually by 2020 the equivalent of taking about 5 9 million of today s cars off the road Consumer and economic benefits Strengthening RGGI s emission cap would result in only a small impact on electric rates with the cost of allowances causing an average increase of only 3 6 percent even at allowance prices of 10 per ton of carbon dioxide and accelerate New Jersey s transition to a clean energy economy with the installation of between 370 to 730 megawatts of clean in state electricity generation enough to replace one mid sized

    Original URL path: http://environmentnewjersey.org/reports/nje/benefits-regional-greenhouse-gas-initiative (2016-05-01)
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  • Senate Environment & Energy Committee Testimony In Favor of S246 | Environment New Jersey
    The findings are consistent with water samples the EPA has collected from at least 42 homes in the area since 2008 Last year after warning residents not to drink or cook with the water and to ventilate their homes when they showered the EPA drilled the monitoring wells to get a more precise picture of the extent of the contamination The Pavillion area has been drilled extensively for natural gas over the last two decades and is home to hundreds of gas wells Residents have said that for nearly a decade that fracking has caused their water to turn black and smell like gasoline Some residents suffer from neurological impairment loss of smell and nerve pain they associate with exposure to pollutants The chemical compounds the EPA detected are consistent with those produced from drilling processes including a solvent called 2 Butoxyethanol 2 BE widely used in fracking The wells also contained benzene at 50 times the level that is considered safe for people as well as phenols another dangerous human carcinogen acetone toluene naphthalene and traces of diesel fuel Earthquakes Fracking s full impacts are just now starting to come to light Youngstown Ohio is many things including the subject of a Bruce Springsteen song Until last year it was not known for earthquakes because the city had never suffered from a recorded earthquake By New Year s Eve Youngstown had suffered 11 of them in 2011 alone slightly less than one a month The epicenter of the New Year s Eve quake was within half mile of the 9 000 foot deep well All of the earthquakes emanated from within five miles of local drilling and in some cases as close as a few thousand feet Because quakes are otherwise rare in the Youngstown area the Ohio Department

    Original URL path: http://environmentnewjersey.org/news/nje/senate-environment-energy-committee-testimony-favor-s246 (2016-05-01)
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  • Testimony to the National Park Service Lafayette, New Jersey | Environment New Jersey
    actions of Casey Kays and the hundreds of residents who joined him to protect the Gap by hiking to Sunfish Pond The movement to save the Gap from the ill fated Tock Island Dam project is a legendary case of citizen organizing to stop a massive federal intrusion We have come too far to allow the Gap to be stamped with a massive industrial project which will change and scar it forever The findings of the draft EIS are exhaustive and they should be finalized The best option for the Gap is not to build a massive new powerline through it This incursion can t be mitigated by additional land purchases as PSEG is attempting to do Our members come to the Gap not to see power lines and so presumably do the 5 million visitors annually The tourism economy that these visitors produce is substantial and clearly running a massive powerline through the heart of the Gap will impact visitor numbers and visitor s experiences The National Park Service has a responsibility to reject this powerline not so because of the immediate ecological and aesthetic impacts on the Gap It has a responsibility to reject this powerline because of the type of energy it will transmit With all apologies to Gertrude Stein a coal line is a coal line is a coal line The Park Service has a responsibility to take into consideration the impacts of global warming to the Park over the course of this century We can anticipate if we continue as business as usual that we will see the climate of the Delaware Water Gap as well as all of New Jersey shift to average temperatures that we more accustomed to seeing in Southern states Greater average temperatures will also increase air pollution across the state

    Original URL path: http://environmentnewjersey.org/news/nje/testimony-national-park-service-lafayette-new-jersey (2016-05-01)
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  • Testimony: Proposed Fuel Efficiency and Carbon Pollution Standards for Cars and Light Trucks in Model Years 2017-2025 | Environment New Jersey
    monumental victory for our environment and the biggest step this country has ever taken to get off oil and tackle global warming Our cars and trucks use almost half of the oil we use every day and spew out nearly 20 percent of the pollution that contributes to global warming Multiple analyses have shown that the standards will achieve impressive savings for our environment for our economy and for our national security We released Gobbling Less Gas for Thanksgiving which evaluated the impact the standard would have over the Thanksgiving travel week alone one of the busiest weeks of the year for auto travel Our analysis found that if the average car or truck met the proposed 2025 standards today over the 2011 Thanksgiving weekend alone New Jersey residents would have used 1 8 million fewer gallons of oil and would have cut emissions of carbon pollution by 47 percent all while saving New Jersey residents 6 4 million at the pump The standards obviously lead to even greater savings over the course of an entire year While the Environment New Jersey report examined the potential benefits from just one Thanksgiving weekend s worth of travel a separate analysis by the Natural Resources Defense Council and the Union of Concerned Scientists found that a fleet wide 54 5 miles per gallon equivalent fuel efficiency standard for new cars and light trucks in 2025 would cut global warming pollution by 2030 by nearly 280 million metric tons equivalent to shutting down roughly 70 coal fired power plants for one year cut our annual oil consumption by 23 billion gallons equivalent to our annual imports from Saudi Arabia and Iraq and save New Jerseyans 727 million at the gas pump in 2030 As proposed the 2017 2025 fuel efficiency and carbon pollution

    Original URL path: http://environmentnewjersey.org/news/nje/testimony-proposed-fuel-efficiency-and-carbon-pollution-standards-cars-and-light-trucks (2016-05-01)
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  • Preserving America's Natural Heritage | Environment New Jersey
    lost approximately 34 6 million acres of agricultural land over that same time period lands that are not only important for the production of food but which also play an important role in local ecosystems 1 Despite the recent downturn in the real estate market there is every indication that the long term trend toward sprawling development will result in continued paving over of woods pastures and other open spaces across America If states want to save the special places that remain within their borders they need to redouble their efforts and quickly Fortunately the examples set by existing state land preservation programs hold important lessons for states as they seek to protect their most treasured natural areas This report profiles the experiences of preservation programs in 15 states as they have striven for consistent and adequate funding for open space protection The experiences of these states suggest that future state level land preservation efforts in the United States should Plan for and finance preservation over the long term States in which funding for preservation is subject to the annual state budget process have a more difficult time sustaining consistent and meaningful land preservation efforts Consistent funding is important because there is often a very short window of opportunity during which threatened open spaces can be protected The loss of funding at a critical moment could result in important natural areas being lost forever The most effective way to ensure longterm stability in funding is to adopt multiyear programs paid for with bonds backed by dedicated revenue streams States such as Florida which has established 10 year preservation programs funded through the issuance of bonds have been able to maintain momentum for their preservation programs without having those efforts interrupted by funding cuts during periods when state budgets are tight Create a dedicated funding stream States have created a variety of dedicated funding streams for preservation programs ranging from real estate taxes to a percentage share of lottery revenue to a designated portion of the state s general sales taxes In reality however no source of funding is truly dedicated forever and legislators in several states have diverted funding from these sources to fill shortterm budget holes The dedicated funding sources that appear least likely to be diverted are those that are dedicated in the state constitution to land preservation or are used to secure revenue bonds Constitutional provisions that dedicate specific funding sources to preservation programs are difficult to overturn Issuing revenue bonds secured with a stable source of dedicated funding can make it difficult to divert funding from preservation activities while providing consistent funding for preservation needs over a period of time In several states dedicated sources are not the main source of preservation funding but still play a useful role in helping a state to diversify its funding stream for preservation minimizing damage in cases where funding from one source temporarily dries up Set goals and evaluate progress Several states including Connecticut and North Carolina have set

    Original URL path: http://environmentnewjersey.org/reports/nje/preserving-americas-natural-heritage (2016-05-01)
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