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  • Wasting our Waterways 2012 | Environment New Jersey Research and Policy Center
    were larger than the discharges of such toxicants to the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers combined Toxic releases continued in already damaged waterways The Calumet River system in Indiana and Illinois home to five different Superfund toxic waste sites and at one time so polluted that not even sludge worms could live there ranked high on the list of developmental and reproductive toxic releases due to ongoing discharges from steel mills and an oil refinery Toxic chemicals linked to serious health effects were released in large amounts to America s waterways in 2010 Industrial facilities discharged approximately 1 5 million pounds of chemicals linked to cancer to more than 1 000 waterways during 2010 Nevada s Burns Creek received the largest volume of carcinogenic releases with a small neighboring creek placing third The Mississippi River Ohio River and Tennessee River also suffered large releases of carcinogens Pulp and paper mills gold mines and chemical manufacturers were the industries that released the greatest volume of carcinogenic chemicals in 2010 About 626 000 pounds of chemicals linked to developmental disorders were discharged into more than 900 waterways Burns Creek in Nevada a small waterway near a gold mine suffered the greatest amount of developmental toxicant discharges followed by the Kanawha River in West Virginia and the Mississippi River Gold mining was the largest source of developmental toxicants followed by pesticide manufacturing and fossil fueled power generation Approximately 354 000 pounds of chemicals linked to reproductive disorders were released to more than 900 waterways West Virginia s Kanawha River received the heaviest dose of reproductive toxicants followed by the Mississippi Ohio and Brazos rivers Discharges of persistent bioaccumulative toxics including dioxin and mercury organochlorines and phthalates are also widespread Safer industrial practices can reduce or eliminate discharges of these and other dangerous substances to

    Original URL path: http://www.environmentnewjerseycenter.org/reports/nje/wasting-our-waterways-2012 (2016-05-01)
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  • In the Path of the Storm | Environment New Jersey Research and Policy Center
    damage at least 14 set an all time record with total damages from those disasters of at least 55 billion Record breaking extreme weather events were responsible for many of 2011 s worst weather related disasters Texas experienced the hottest summer June through August ever recorded in any U S state smashing the previous record set by Oklahoma during the Dust Bowl summer of 1934 by an astonishing 1 6 degrees The high temperatures combined with Texas driest 12 month period on record triggered an exceptional drought that ruined crops and led to the state s worst wildfire season in history Wildfires claimed the lives of 10 people in Texas while more than 20 people in Texas and Oklahoma perished from extreme heat Parts of the upper Plains experienced their wettest spring on record contributing to massive flooding along the Missouri River The Missouri basin topped its all time record for monthly runoff while the nearby Souris River overwhelmed defenses that had been designed to withstand a 100 year flood inundating much of Minot North Dakota and forcing cancellation of the North Dakota State Fair At least five people died in flooding in the upper Plains Much of the Ohio River Valley experienced its wettest spring on record causing the Mississippi River to approach a 74 year high at Memphis inflicting more than 6 billion in damage and resulting in at least seven deaths New Jersey experienced its wettest month in its history August 2011 punctuated by heavy rains from Hurricane Irene that sent rivers to historic highs and damaged more than 2 000 homes Chicago experienced its third biggest snowfall in history while much of the Northeast experienced its heaviest October snowfall in at least two centuries Some types of extreme weather events have become more common in recent years in the United States and worldwide while science projects that global warming will likely fuel further changes in extreme weather in the years ahead The United States has experienced an increase in heavy precipitation events with the rainiest 1 percent of all storms delivering 20 percent more rain on average at the end of the 20th century than at the beginning The trend toward extreme precipitation is projected to continue even though higher temperatures and drier summers will likely also increase the risk of drought in between the rainy periods and for certain parts of thecountry The United States has experienced an increase in the number of heat waves over the last half century Scientists project that heat waves and unusually hot seasons will likely become more common in a warming world Hurricanes are expected to become more intense and bring greater amounts of rainfall even though the number of hurricanes may remain the same or decrease Global warming may also increase the danger posed by extreme weather events Rising sea level ecosystem changes and changes in the form of precipitation could reduce the ability of natural and man made systems to withstand even normal weather events The United

    Original URL path: http://www.environmentnewjerseycenter.org/reports/nje/path-storm (2016-05-01)
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  • Benefits of the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative | Environment New Jersey Research and Policy Center
    of annual energy expenditures for New Jersey homes and businesses Those costs however will be more than made up for over time by reductions in energy consumption driven by RGGI programs According to Analysis Group RGGI s investments thus far will lead to average energy savings of 25 per residential customer across the Northeast In New Jersey total energy bill savings will amount to approximately 150 million Economic benefits RGGI is helping to fuel the transition to a clean energy economy in New Jersey RGGI has led to the installation of approximately 7 5 megawatts of solar energy in New Jersey and the creation of nearly 1 800 job years of employment in the state according to ENE Environment Northeast New Jersey can reap even greater benefits by simply staying in the program even if pollution allowance prices remain low Environment Even if pollution allowance prices remain at current low levels New Jersey would achieve significant emissions reductions by simply staying in RGGI and directing program revenues to clean energy programs By 2018 New Jersey will avoid 127 000 metric tons of carbon dioxide pollution annually the equivalent taking 24 300 of today s passenger vehicles off the road Consumer costs The cost of pollution allowances under RGGI is projected to remain low through 2018 Remaining in the program and investing revenues from the program in clean energy programs would eliminate demand for 461 gigawatt hours GWh of centrally generated electricity per year enough to power 52 000 typical New Jersey homes and reducing the need for costly investments in new generation and transmission capacity Economic benefits Remaining in RGGI would enable the state to install 100 MW of solar and 95 MW of combined heat and power capacity assuming the state continues its current practices of clean energy investment fueling continued growth in the state s clean energy economy By working with other Northeastern states to strengthen RGGI New Jersey can maximize the benefits of the program Environment By adjusting RGGI s emission cap to reflect real as opposed to projected 2009 emissions and doubling the reduction target to achieve a 20 percent reduction in emissions by 2020 the Northeastern states could reduce carbon dioxide emissions region wide by 31 million tons annually by 2020 the equivalent of taking about 5 9 million of today s cars off the road Consumer and economic benefits Strengthening RGGI s emission cap would result in only a small impact on electric rates with the cost of allowances causing an average increase of only 3 6 percent even at allowance prices of 10 per ton of carbon dioxide and accelerate New Jersey s transition to a clean energy economy with the installation of between 370 to 730 megawatts of clean in state electricity generation enough to replace one mid sized coal fired power plant To take advantage of RGGI s potential to clean up pollution from New Jersey s power plants and move the state toward a clean energy economy New Jersey s

    Original URL path: http://www.environmentnewjerseycenter.org/reports/nje/benefits-regional-greenhouse-gas-initiative (2016-05-01)
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  • A Tale of Two Shores | Environment New Jersey Research and Policy Center
    should definitely read Tale of two Shores because it is awesome Report A Tale of Two Shores Release date Thursday December 1 2011 Download Report PDF Getting Started This time we are trying to make an Environment Featured Resource Page as a REPORT content type and see how that works Tale of Two Shores Tips This is how you do awesome things With shores Get our RSS feed Archives Blog

    Original URL path: http://www.environmentnewjerseycenter.org/reports/njc/tale-two-shores (2016-05-01)
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  • A Tale of Two Shores | Environment New Jersey Research and Policy Center
    Little Egg Harbor estuary comes from directly from the surface water discharge of the Metedeconk River and Toms River basins which have seen some of the highest rates of development in recent years We welcome this important report said Cindy Zipf Executive Director of Clean Ocean Action It speaks to the heart of our daily work highlights the evolving struggles that New Jersey faces and calls on our leaders to take aggressive and immediate action The state is poised to pass meaningful legislation and announce real commitments for projects like Barnegat Bay We encourage them to use this document as they move forward in their efforts to give all of New Jersey what it deserves an ocean that is clean and free from industrialization and safe generations to come It s time for our legislators to be bold we are all watching The report outlines the increasing ecological markers of decline at the Shore The Bay which takes roughly three months to fully circulate its water sees the most intense declines but the trending ecological decline is not unique to the Bay The report documents how hard clam harvests in the Barnegat Bay declined by more than 99 percent between the early 1970s and 2000 and bay scallops which sustained a busy fishery in the 1950s are virtually absent from the bay today Seagrasses such as eelgrass which provide shelter and food for a variety of fish species in the bay have experienced a similar steep decline with aboveground eelgrass biomass in the bay having declined by 50 percent between 2004 and 2006 The report also analyzes the impact of the Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station on aquatic life resulting from the daily intake of over 1 4 billion gallons from the Bay We have changed the ecology of the Bay The old saying that the solution to pollution is dilution doesn t apply anymore to the Bay There s less clams less crabs less fish said Tom Fote legislative chairman of Jersey Coast Anglers Association The Bay is the economic engine that drives Ocean County and the Shore Politicians forget that we re only stewards for the next generation for treasures like the Bay and we have to hold up our end of the bargain The report also documents how Barnegat Bay Little Egg Harbor is not the only estuary in trouble New Jersey s more southerly inland bays from Great Bay at the mouth of the Mullica River south to Cape May are documented by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration NOAA to be highly eutrophic meaning that they are susceptible to nutrient fueled algae blooms that harm aquatic ecosystems and have the potential to deprive waterways of oxygen Water quality conditions in Barnegat Bay Little Egg Harbor have worsened over the past decade while NOAA projects that nutrient related symptoms in the southern coastal bays are likely to worsen in the years to come This is on top of the designation of the entire coastline by NJDEP

    Original URL path: http://www.environmentnewjerseycenter.org/reports/njc/tale-two-shores-0 (2016-05-01)
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  • Preserving America's Natural Heritage | Environment New Jersey Research and Policy Center
    for consistent and adequate funding for open space protection The experiences of these states suggest that future state level land preservation efforts in the United States should Plan for and finance preservation over the long term States in which funding for preservation is subject to the annual state budget process have a more difficult time sustaining consistent and meaningful land preservation efforts Consistent funding is important because there is often a very short window of opportunity during which threatened open spaces can be protected The loss of funding at a critical moment could result in important natural areas being lost forever The most effective way to ensure longterm stability in funding is to adopt multiyear programs paid for with bonds backed by dedicated revenue streams States such as Florida which has established 10 year preservation programs funded through the issuance of bonds have been able to maintain momentum for their preservation programs without having those efforts interrupted by funding cuts during periods when state budgets are tight Create a dedicated funding stream States have created a variety of dedicated funding streams for preservation programs ranging from real estate taxes to a percentage share of lottery revenue to a designated portion of the state s general sales taxes In reality however no source of funding is truly dedicated forever and legislators in several states have diverted funding from these sources to fill shortterm budget holes The dedicated funding sources that appear least likely to be diverted are those that are dedicated in the state constitution to land preservation or are used to secure revenue bonds Constitutional provisions that dedicate specific funding sources to preservation programs are difficult to overturn Issuing revenue bonds secured with a stable source of dedicated funding can make it difficult to divert funding from preservation activities while

    Original URL path: http://www.environmentnewjerseycenter.org/reports/nje/preserving-americas-natural-heritage (2016-05-01)
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  • Reports | Environment New Jersey Research and Policy Center
    enough energy in 2013 to power 15 million homes Continued rapid development of wind energy would allow the renewable resource to supply 30 percent of the nation s electricity by 2030 providing more than enough carbon reductions to meet the U S Environmental Protection Agency s proposed Clean Power Plan Read more about More Wind Less Warming Report Environment New Jersey Research Policy Center America s Dirtiest Power Plants As international leaders prepare for the United Nations Climate Summit next week in New York a new study shows America s power plants dump as much carbon pollution into the air any other country s entire economy except China Environment New Jersey Research Policy Center pointed to the report as evidence for why the Environmental Protection Agency s proposal for the nation s first ever limits on carbon pollution from power plants is a critical step in the international fight against global warming Read more about America s Dirtiest Power Plants Report Environment New Jersey Research Policy Center The Dirtiest Power Plants How America s Dirtiest Power Plants Drive Global Warming Pollution America s power plants are among the leading global sources of the dangerous carbon pollution that is fueling global warming Devastating droughts such as the one in California massive wildfires increased threats to coastal areas due to sea level rise and an increase in extreme rainfall are among the impacts that science tells us will become more frequent and severe unless the United States and the world take action now to reduce carbon pollution Read more about The Dirtiest Power Plants How America s Dirtiest Power Plants Drive Global Warming Pollution Report Environment New Jersey Research Policy Center Driving Cleaner America s and New Jersey s dependence on gasoline as a transportation fuel worsens global warming and threatens public

    Original URL path: http://www.environmentnewjerseycenter.org/reports/rss.xml?page=1 (2016-05-01)
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  • Reports | Environment New Jersey Research and Policy Center
    water America s wind power capacity has quadrupled in the last five years and thanks to wind energy America uses less water for power plants and produces less climate altering carbon pollution We have vast wind energy resources and there is still plenty of room for growth especially for off shore wind But the pending expiration of the federal renewable energy production tax credit and investment tax credit threatens the future expansion of wind power To protect the environment New Jersey and the federal government should continue and expand policies that support wind energy Read more about Wind Power for a Cleaner America Report Environment New Jersey Research and Policy Center Fracking by the Numbers Over the past decade the oil and gas industry has fused two technologies hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling in a highly polluting effort to unlock oil and gas in underground rock formations across the United States This report seeks to quantify some of the key impacts of fracking to date including the production of toxic wastewater water use chemicals use air pollution land damage and global warming emissions Read more about Fracking by the Numbers Report Environment New Jersey Research and Policy Center Fracking by the Numbers Over the past decade the oil and gas industry has fused two technologies hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling in a highly polluting effort to unlock oil and gas in underground rock formations across the United States This report seeks to quantify some of the key impacts of fracking to date including the production of toxic wastewater water use chemicals use air pollution land damage and global warming emissions Read more about Fracking by the Numbers Report Environment New Jersey Research Policy Center Lighting the Way What We Can Learn from America s Top 12 Solar States Solar energy

    Original URL path: http://www.environmentnewjerseycenter.org/reports/rss.xml?page=2 (2016-05-01)
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