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  • Tanker
    Headlands A distress call was made to the Coast Guard at 5 22 pm as onlookers watched the potential disaster unfold A Coast Guard helicopter was quickly on scene to determine if there was any pollution being spilled out into the bay Soon after the Coast Guard alerted Sanctuary staff to the situation With the Cosco Busan incident a near memory swift action was taken Shannon Lyday Ecosystem Monitoring Manager at FMSA was contacted to asses the situation and determine the necessary actions Shannon manages the Beach Watch program which was heavily involved during the Cosco Busan oil spill It was clear from that disaster that Beach Watch had dedicated and trained volunteers that could be called upon to do surveys when and where they were needed The beach segments to be surveyed were chosen and volunteers were contacted that evening just hours after the incident Staff and volunteers mobilized and at dawn the next morning were surveying Rodeo Beach and Kirby Cove in Marin County and Baker Beach and China Beach in San Francisco The tanker had fortunately already unloaded its cargo which was petroleum Nevertheless this could have been a disaster because the ship carried a full tank

    Original URL path: http://www.farallones.org/e_newsletter/2009-02/Tanker.htm (2016-02-13)
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  • OceanFilmFestival
    the Bay on the Embarcadero at Beach St Free admission with Aquarium day ticket or Festival pass Saturday during Program 2 Red Gold is a lushly photographed masterfully scripted and edgily scored documentary A dark cloud hangs over Bristol Bay and the two Alaskan rivers where nearly 60 million salmon spawn Big Mining wants to scrape off the mountaintop above the headwaters Pebble Mine executives promise quick money but the rivers the salmon and the fishermens heritage and livelihood could all meet with swift extinction If the mine goes through Governor Palin will have much to answer for Sunday during Program 6 Peace With Seals a quirky and creative documentary fable takes an informative and darkly entertaining look at the history and future of the highly endangered Mediterranean monk seal and that of humanity Mixing new and vintage footage interspersed with animation and science fiction film excerpts the film profiles biologists philosophers and a 98 year old seal hunter who lend a bizarre mixture of attitudes and history with scientific concerns The factors that are sealing the fate of the Mediterranean monk seal have never been more clearly portrayed Sunday during Program 8 Ice Bears of the Beaufort stunning unrushed

    Original URL path: http://www.farallones.org/e_newsletter/2009-02/OFF.htm (2016-02-13)
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  • ShearwaterTrip
    Zealand This two week trip will also include visits to forests dripping with moss waterfalls gorges glaciers and of course night walks to spot New Zealand s iconic kiwi Fiordland Crested penguins fur seals albatrosses whales and dolphins are just some of the wildlife we will encounter The Farallones Marine Sanctuary Association is supporting these educational tours by making these opportunities available to their members During the Northern Hemisphere s late summer millions of Sooty shearwaters migrate eight thousand miles from New Zealand to the Gulf of the Farallones to feed on the abundant food available from our upwelling season Usually from March through August cold water wells up from the deep and delivers nutrients Upwelled nutrients fertilize sunlit surface waters along our coast nourishing blooms of plantlike plankton phytoplankton that form the foundation of the ocean s food web In good upwelling years when the wind and ocean currents are just right giant blooms of microscopic phytoplankton cloud the Gulf Phytoplankton are eaten by zooplankton and fishes which in turn provide a feast for seabirds seals whales sharks and humans The California Current along our coast is one of just four major coastal upwelling ecosystems in the world These

    Original URL path: http://www.farallones.org/e_newsletter/2009-02/NZShearwater.htm (2016-02-13)
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  • TerriWatson
    profit wilderness education and environmental education and advocacy Since 1990 Terri has been a senior field instructor with the National Outdoor Leadership School NOLS and an EMT with the Wilderness Medicine Institute She has also held multiple operations and program staff positions with a volunteer based environmental aviation group called LightHawk including Executive Director from 2001 2004 She continues to serve as the Aviation Chair of LightHawk s Board of Directors Originally coming to the Bay Area as a pilot for REACH Air Medical Services in Santa Rosa she and her partner live aboard their Mason 33 sailboat in San Rafael enjoying the opportunity to explore the Bay and the Gulf of the Farallones Marine Sanctuary firsthand They are avid sea kayakers and novice kite boarders as well A chance to work with an organization dedicated to the advancement of the Sanctuary came at a critical juncture in Terri s career choices and as she puts it provides a way to combine my love of the sea my background in marine education with NOLS and my desire to contribute meaningfully to our local ocean community I m really excited to be a part of such an incredible group of people

    Original URL path: http://www.farallones.org/e_newsletter/2009-01/TerriWatson.htm (2016-02-13)
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  • Grey
    pre whaling population was but researchers at Stanford University now suggest they may have once numbered over 100 000 With legal protections their numbers rebounded until in 1994 when their population reached approximately 20 000 and they were removed altogether from the Endangered Species List Their numbers climbed to around 26 600 in 1999 The gray whale has been much vaunted as a conservation success story But there have been recent signs that not all is well Beginning in 1999 and 2000 approximately one third of the gray whale population disappeared Carcasses washed up all along the coast it was suspected that malnourishment and disease were the primary causes Since 2004 researchers from Baja California to the Pacific Northwest have reported unusually high numbers of skinny whales As of 2008 according to whale researcher John Calambokidis their numbers are now around 17 000 Some attribute the scarcity of food to the shrinkage of the north polar ice sheets whose undersides would ordinarily grow carpets of tiny marine plants algae which die off and rain down as organic nutrients onto the muddy seafloor Algae is vital food for the tiny crustaceans on which the gray whales forage The loss of algae has in turn altered the gray whale s food supply With the disappearance of their customary food gray whales are attempting to adapt their foraging habits to the food that is still available Some will be more successful than others But one thing is certain the ocean climate is changing and all marine creatures will be affected Now is the time to think about what you individually can do to minimize global climate change Experience gray whales by land or by sea from January southbound through May northbound VESSEL BASED NATURALIST LED DAY CRUISES The Farallones Marine Sanctuary Association 415

    Original URL path: http://www.farallones.org/e_newsletter/2009-01/Grey.htm (2016-02-13)
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  • Obama
    Article in Upwelling 2 of 4 Next Article in Upwelling 4 of 4 Article by Tim Murphy courtesy of Boat U S Magazine January 2009 2005 2006 Farallones Marine Sanctuary

    Original URL path: http://www.farallones.org/e_newsletter/2009-01/Obama.htm (2016-02-13)
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  • Jumbo
    squid have two diamond shaped fins which they use to swim and glide They can swim up to 15 miles an hour and can eject themselves from the water and fly through the air to escape predators Sperm whales sharks seals swordfish and marlin feed on jumbo squid of all sizes gulls and large fish often capture juveniles Jumbo squid hunt in schools containing as many as 1 200 individuals They surface at night to hunt lanternfish shrimp mollusks and other cephalopods Range Jumbo squid a species that historically lived in the warm waters off the coast of Central and South America have recently invaded the more temperate waters of California However some California fishermen dispute the new invasion claiming that they have encountered the creature for years In Mexico the squid is known as diablo rojo red devil and its ferocity is legendary among local fishermen and divers who have reported attacks during routine dives Recently the squid have been appearing further north as far as Sitka Alaska raising alarm about ecological problems possibly underlying the northward migration Could this voracious predator become a common sight off the coast of California Scientists who have studied the squid think so Bruce Robison and Louis Zeidberg marine biologists at Stanford University who published a paper on the invasion of jumbo squid into California waters think that a combination of warming waters caused by climate change and a decline in large open water predators such as sharks and tuna have helped this predator proliferate into areas where previously it had not existed By all indications it appears that the jumbo squid may now be a permanent resident in California waters including in our marine reserves That has scientists and fisheries managers worried as many believe that the expansion of the jumbo squid

    Original URL path: http://www.farallones.org/e_newsletter/2009-01/Jumbo.htm (2016-02-13)
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  • Academy
    is redolent of sea spray Waves lap at a small sandy beach and a tidal mechanism creates pounding surf as saltwater surges against a rocky shore exposing marine animals such as sea stars and urchins adapted to chilling waters then alternately exposing them to drying air and sun Below the shimmering surface leopard and smoothhound sharks glide seeking whatever prey is on offer On the lower level through a looped film by award winning photographer Bob Talbot visitors can celebrate the region s great whales dolphins seals and sharks The lower level s 18 feet high window to the underwater world reveals monkeyface prickleback eels sharks anemones rockfish herring sardines and urchins Adjacent tanks feature giant sea bass and the elusive giant Pacific octopus Just beyond the main tank lies the Discovery Tidepool staffed by docents who guide visitors through up close tactile encounters with a variety of nearshore creatures Interactive Dive Stations invite the visitor to a deeper understanding of the relationships and mechanisms that underlie such marine biodiversity The California Rocky Coast is just one part of a growing partnership between the Sanctuary and the Academy Another is a specially trained cadre of volunteer docents for the Tidepool

    Original URL path: http://www.farallones.org/e_newsletter/2008-12/Academy.htm (2016-02-13)
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