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  • ThankYou
    visitors with Pacific Mackerel in saor with sultana raisins currents and pine nuts Judy Rodgers from Zuni Cafe served Pan Bagnât a Mediterranean Summer Vegetable Tuna Sandwich with tomatoes peppers cucumber preserved tuna lettuce basil tossed with vinaigrette and flavored with anchovy capers and olives From Nopa Lawrence Jossel delighted us with trap caught Black Cod poached in olive oil on a bed of spiced chickpeas and served with grilled bread con tomate Hog Island Oyster Co shucked hundreds of fresh local oysters Annie Somerville from Greens treated visitors to a Southwestern Border Stew full of corn butternut squash carrots peppers ancho chilies and cilantro served with grilled polenta All food drink and culinary skills were generously donated and 100 of the proceeds benefit the education and volunteer programs of the Farallones Marine Sanctuary Association Thank you again to Monterey Fish Market for generously donating all the seafood for this event as well as all previous years of OceanFest In addition the food was deliciously paired with wines donated by New Zealand Wines and beer from many local breweries Kids young and old danced to the contagious tunes of Tim Cain and all were excited to see the talented clowns

    Original URL path: http://www.farallones.org/e_newsletter/2007-10/ThankYou.htm (2016-02-13)
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  • Climate Change
    ocean temperatures that lead to species migration or extinction the melting of arctic sea ice that endangers polar bears and other species rising sea levels that threaten our coast significant changes in the manner in which the ocean s currents transport water around the globe and the acidification of the ocean The marine sanctuary just off our shore can be seen as a microcosm of the ocean s larger issues and so local scientists and those charged with protecting our resources are keeping a watchful eye on these changes including the effects of rising acidification Although the natural absorption of CO2 by the world s oceans helps mitigate the climatic effects of man made emissions of CO2 it is believed that the resulting decrease in pH rise in acidity will have negative consequences primarily for oceanic calcifying organisms such as the ones found in the rocky intertidal environments in the Gulf of the Farallones Marine Sanctuary and in the open ocean According to the Center for Biological Diversity Carbon dioxide pollution threatens to decimate corals and other calcifying marine life Rising levels of carbon dioxide in the ocean strip the seawater of important compounds needed for marine organisms to build shells and skeletons Corals crabs starfish sea urchins and plankton will have difficulty building their protective shells Under normal conditions calcite and aragonite are stable in surface waters since the carbonate ion is at supersaturating concentrations However as ocean pH falls so does the concentration of this ion and when carbonate becomes under saturated structures made of calcium carbonate are vulnerable to dissolution Research has already found that corals algae foraminifera shellfish and sea butterflies experience reduced calcification or enhanced dissolution when exposed to elevated CO2 Aside from calcification organisms may suffer other adverse effects either directly as reproductive or

    Original URL path: http://www.farallones.org/e_newsletter/2007-10/ClimateChange.htm (2016-02-13)
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  • TomalesMooring
    agencies that are collaborating to identify best strategies to manage vessels issued a document for public input on August 31st that kicked off a three month public input period The document Protecting Tomales Bay by Managing Vessel Usage A Document for Public Input was released to engage the community early in the process to develop plans to provide a mooring permit system minimize overboard discharges from boats and prevent wildlife disturbance and the introduction of invasive species The goals of the committee are to protect water quality wildlife and recreational opportunities in Tomales Bay by managing the use and storage of vessels in and on the bay Vessel mooring is the most controversial issue that the committee plans to address Currently the method for obtaining a legal permitted mooring in Tomales Bay is so complex that only one vessel owner has successfully obtained a permitted mooring Boat owners seeking a mooring permit must navigate the application process of multiple agencies The committee has identified 176 moorings placed without permit in Tomales Bay The agencies hope to create a mooring permit system that allows boat owners to moor in Tomales Bay in ways that protect seagrass seal haul outs swimmers aquaculture and navigation In addition the committee proposes creating mooring fields and providing environmentally sensitive mooring systems The Committee has proposed actions to reduce overboard discharge of vessel sewage by installing at least one sewage discharge facility designating Tomales Bay as no discharge zone for vessel sewage and requiring that live aboard vessels be equipped with on board sewage holding tanks The agencies propose encouraging a wide range of safe and environmentally sound boating practices through a comprehensive boater education and outreach program Education will focus on minimizing disturbance of wildlife and habitat destruction discharges of sewage fuel oil and toxic

    Original URL path: http://www.farallones.org/e_newsletter/2007-10/TomalesMooring.htm (2016-02-13)
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  • OceanFest2007
    Delicious chocolate treats and milkshakes by Moonstruck Chocolate Fair trade coffee by Mr Espresso Children s activities including Music by Tim Cain Roving clowns from Prescott Circus Grass fed Let s Be Frank hot dogs Sharktoberfest Fish printing and more Over 20 exhibitors featuring ways YOU can discover your marine sanctuary Win a kayaking adventure in Baja romantic getaways whale watching fine dining wine and more in the OceanFest raffle To reduce OceanFest s carbon footprint FMSA is encouraging attendees to bike to the event The San Francisco Bicycle Coalition will provide free valet bike service and Blazing Saddles will offer attendees a 15 discount on bike rentals for the day In addition OceanFest will neutralize its carbon emissions through the purchase of carbon credits with Terrapass I look forward each year to OceanFest a fun informative and delicious outdoor fair that delivers a sustainable seafood message to thousands of visitors says Judy Rodgers chef and owner of San Francisco s renowned Zuni Cafe who is participating in her fifth OceanFest Join me and other local chefs for seafood dishes that celebrate our ocean and the marine sanctuaries beyond the Golden Gate All chefs will volunteer their culinary talents to

    Original URL path: http://www.farallones.org/e_newsletter/2007-09/OceanFest2007.htm (2016-02-13)
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  • Sharkattack
    to locate the movement of living animals in the water Hence a swimmer splashing around in the ocean could easily be mistaken for a seal Some people argue that wearing a dark wetsuit makes humans look even more like seals but there is no scientific proof that sharks visually mistake humans for pinnipeds The fact is that where there are many seals and sea lions there are sharks and ocean goers need to take caution particularly in areas abundant with pinniped life Credit Bob Wilson Odd behavior of seals birds or dolphins can be a warning sign that something else is in the water At the recent attack in Marina several dolphins began splashing around in a frantic circle moments before Endris was attacked A white shark attacks from below so there is no visual warning that one is coming contrary to the exposed fin of the Jaws film An incredible part of the Marina story is after Endris was attacked the dolphins continued to splash in an aggressive circle apparently trying to protect Endris However the shark returned for a second attack According to witnesses the dolphins kept thrashing around the wounded surfer until the shark let go The dolphins were doing these big tail slaps on the surface of the water said Wes Williams a witness to the attack It was so bloody that the water splashes were all red All of a sudden one dolphin leapt full out of the air and swung its tail around missing Todd s head by two inches Although Endris was attacked twice he survived the experience Witnesses profess that the dolphins saved the surfer s life The Marina assault was unusual as white sharks generally attack with one bite and then retreat and wait for the prey to bleed to death

    Original URL path: http://www.farallones.org/e_newsletter/2007-09/Sharkattack.htm (2016-02-13)
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  • MLPA
    protected areas from Pigeon Point to Point Conception The designation significantly increases the protection of marine life on the Central Coast and involved the public and other stakeholders in a two year public process The MLPA was designed to advance the conservation of marine resources for their long term sustainable use while also enhancing outdoor recreation and ocean research opportunities along the coast There are three types of Marine Protected Areas state marine reserve state marine park and state marine conservation area each with different rules about what activities can or cannot be done within each In general marine reserves do not allow any type of extractive activities including fishing or kelp harvesting marine parks do not allow any commercial extraction and marine conservation areas do not allow some combination of commercial and or recreational extraction The 29 sites in the Central Coast region represent approximately 204 square miles about 1 of state waters and include 15 State Marine Conservation Areas 13 no take State Marine Reserves that total 85 square miles and 1 State Marine Recreational Managed Area Morro Bay State Marine Recreational Management Area where recreational fishing is limited or restricted These new marine protected areas will help us preserve some of California s most biologically significant marine habitats while also allowing for recreational and commercial fishing said Secretary for Resources Mike Chrisman who noted that the central coast is the first of five regions that will eventually lead to a network of MPA s along California s 1 100 mile coastline We re Next The second phase of the MLPA Initiative is currently underway to determine how California Northern Coast will be protected One of the main goals of the MLPA is to provide an opportunity for scientists to understand our marine and coastal environment a strategy

    Original URL path: http://www.farallones.org/e_newsletter/2007-09/MLPA.htm (2016-02-13)
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  • Lungefeed
    whales Captain Mick cut the engine and the boat drifted in the choppy waters Whales were suddenly right alongside then under the boat including a mother and calf that appeared out of nowhere There were breaching whales and synchronistic tandem lunge feeding fast horizontal surfacing with mouths open All this incredible activity hopefully indicates a successful upwelling this year which results in plenty of food in the nutrient rich waters just off our coast Nature threw a different wrinkle at the California Current system in 2005 when the spring upwelling was delayed by a month Winds that normally cause upwelling were absent creating the lowest upwelling favorable wind stress in 20 years Near shore waters were two degrees C warmer than average surf zone chlorophyll levels were 50 percent of normal and nutrient levels were reduced by one third Changes in water movement triggered by the wind shifts had a drastic effect on mussel and barnacle larvae which decreased by 83 and 66 percent respectively In 2005 and 2006 researchers found thousands of starving birds washing up on shore Scientists trying to predict salmon runs recorded large swings in ocean temperatures at a much higher frequency than the past a change that signals large shifts in the amount of food available for salmon birds and marine mammals Scientists linked the low oxygen zones and animal die offs to changes in the timing and strength of upwelling a usually reliable and regular wind driven process that brings cold nutrient rich waters up from the depths of the ocean and fuels productive coastal ecosystems Oregon State University s Jane Lubchenco a co organizer of the West Coast variability symposium and past president of the AAAS said the bottom line is that the dramatic events of the past few years have shown how

    Original URL path: http://www.farallones.org/e_newsletter/2007-08/Lungefeed.htm (2016-02-13)
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  • Squid
    the new invasion claiming that they have encountered the creature for years In Mexico the squid is known as diablo rojo red devil and its ferocity is legendary among local fishermen and divers who have reported attacks during routine dives Could this voracious predator become a common sight off the coast of California Scientists who have studied the squid think so Bruce Robison and Louis Zeidberg marine biologists at Stanford University who recently published a paper on the invasion of Humboldt squid into California waters think that a combination of warming waters caused by climate change and a decline in large open water predators such as sharks and tuna have helped this predator proliferate into areas where previously it had not existed By all indications it appears that the Humboldt squid may now be a permanent resident in California waters including in our marine reserves That has scientists and fisheries managers worried as many believe that the expansion of the Humboldt squid may threaten the marine ecosystem The squid may devour entire stocks of commercially valuable fish such as the Pacific whiting Others are not so worried about the expansion of the Humboldt squid In Southern California a thriving sport fishery for the squid has existed for the better part of a decade Charter boat captains operating out of the central coast to Bodega Bay began offering fishing trips a couple years ago for the Humboldt squid as a way to keep fishing when the salmon rockfish or albacore tuna fishing was slow Rick Powers captain of the New Sea Angler out of Bodega Bay recently told The Stockton Record that I discovered the Jumbo squid on Cordell Bank about three years ago These powerful squid will attack anything like a pack of hungry wolves and are great sport to

    Original URL path: http://www.farallones.org/e_newsletter/2007-08/Squid.htm (2016-02-13)
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