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  • Camp
    explore tide pools monitor sand crabs visit aquariums and kayak in Richardson Bay By the end of the camp the 8 to 13 year olds are junior stewards attuned to the importance of protecting our vital oceans This year FMSA extended its ocean protecting spirit into the community by hiring a few high school interns to help teach the younger children A diverse group the interns included Joseph Gin from the Sunset District of San Francisco Andrena Pearson from Ingleside and Anna Sparer from Berkeley Exploring and discovering the local coastline this group will pass on their knowledge to other high school students in San Francisco as well as their friends and families On the final week of summer camp I sat down with these new marine stewards and talked to them about their experience learning and teaching at the Sanctuary Explorers Camp SM How has this experience changed your attitude towards the ocean Joseph It makes me aware of how our actions what we eat and throw away affect the ocean We saw animals choking on plastic Anna Working with young kids I realized how little they know about the ocean Andrena Don t litter Now if I see someone litter I tell them to pick it up and not to litter When my Dad threw something out of the car I made him stop and go back and get it SM What is the coolest thing you experienced or learned during camp Joseph It was really cool to see the kids faces when they found things in the tide pools like crabs Anna California Sheephead fish start as females and turn into males Andrena That two elephants can stand on a blue whale tongue with the mouth closed SM What have you learned about teaching Joseph How to

    Original URL path: http://www.farallones.org/e_newsletter/2007-08/Camp.htm (2016-02-13)
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  • Farallones Marine Sanctuary Association

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    Original URL path: /news/event_calendar.php (2016-02-13)


  • SharkFilm
    with sharks on coral reefs of Hawaii or in the kelp forests of our own marine sanctuary is a spiritual experience one that not everyone is so fortunate to experience I used to see many more sharks off the California coastline Fishermen can tell you firsthand that sharks are growing more rare not just on coral reefs but here in the waters of our own marine sanctuary We need to reverse this trend and we can only achieve it through awareness and compassion for the seas that sustain us a species LH have you done any diving or film making in northern California DM I started diving in Central California and just last weekend went diving off Sonoma After filming in the Tuamotus the wetsuits and extra gear here add a new layer of complexity It is much more challenging and in many ways more rewarding diving here than in the more benign conditions of the tropics It is particularly challenging to film given the waves and winds along our coast Californians are fortunate to live along a remarkable coastline with a population that as a whole defines itself by the Pacific Ocean I m currently working on a film shot in Marine Protected Areas and Reserves off our coastline including parts of the GFNM Sanctuary LH Have you experienced any close calls while filming sharks DM Not really I love sharks and when I m in their world it s not about my experience but about the sharks experience to this invader in their ocean world Most of the time the big sharks swim away or give a brief ocean check then leave It s what made Sharks Stewards of the Reef difficult to make we didn t chum or attract sharks like so many other films we attempted

    Original URL path: http://www.farallones.org/e_newsletter/2007-07/SharkFilm.htm (2016-02-13)
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  • BottleBay
    there have been numerous sightings just off the FMSA office at Crissy Field Bottlenose Dolphins range all over the Pacific from South America to Southern California but not until the El Niño of 1983 were they spotted off the Northern California coast Aboard a whale watching cruise in the Gulf of the Farallones during the 1982 83 El Niño event several marine life enthusiasts were relishing an encounter with a mixed species pod of dolphins Common dolphins northern right whale dolphins and Pacific white sided dolphins were slicing foamy crisscross patterns across the surface of the gulf s cold green waters Mixed in among them however was a fourth species larger more robust drab gray and lacking the striking counter coloration that the others sported so elegantly But this drab group set two people shouting with excitement they were bottlenose dolphins A search of the scientific literature revealed that this was a northern record for live bottlenose sightings the previous being Point Conception near Santa Barbara dating back to the late 1800s These dolphins had apparently taken advantage of the invitingly warm waters of the El Niño event to hitch a ride north expanding their range by nearly 300 miles And ironically while the El Niño wrought havoc with other marine life this opportunistic and adaptable species carved out a new niche and settled in permanently it seems As the El Nino faded and the ocean resumed its chilly low 50s temperatures the dolphins continued to travel north Since then they have been regular near shore visitors enchanting beachgoers and startling unwary surfers with their shark like dorsal fins In 2003 Maria Brown Superintendent of the Farallones Sanctuary noticed a single dolphin off Crissy Field Beach It was a bottlenose dolphin and when reported to NOAA it became the very

    Original URL path: http://www.farallones.org/e_newsletter/2007-07/BottleBay.htm (2016-02-13)
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  • Invasive
    by the U S Interior Department are at risk from invasive species Studies have shown that many species of bacteria plants and animals can survive in ballast water and sediment carried on ships The discharge of ballast water is a major pathway for the transfer of potentially harmful aquatic organisms and pathogens around the world Ballast water is taken on and released by a vessel to maintain trim and stability when loading and unloading cargo When the water is taken onboard any organism less than about 1 cm in size in the vicinity of the intake may also be ballasted into the vessel All or part of the ballast water and the organisms in the ballast water tanks may be discharged in port when a ship takes on cargo or fuel It has been estimated that 21 billion gallons of ballast water are discharged into US ports each year Thus ballast water can be a major pathway of new species introduction to aquatic ecosystems It can contain all sorts of microscopic marine life including eggs cysts larvae and bacteria The Marine Invasive Species Program is a multi agency effort to control the introduction on Non Indigenous Species NIS from the ballast of ocean going vessels Under this program the Department of Fish and Game is required to conduct studies to determine the level of invasion in the coastal and estuarine waters of the state and monitor for new introductions to determine whether the program s ballast control measures are effective The Gulf of the Farallones Draft Management Plan proposes regulatory changes that would prohibit releasing any non native species to the ecosystems protected by the sanctuary The intent of the prohibition is to protect the biodiversity of the sanctuary s ecosystems and to preserve the native functional aspects of the

    Original URL path: http://www.farallones.org/e_newsletter/2007-07/Invasive.htm (2016-02-13)
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  • Delta
    wild waters of the marine sanctuary just off our shore where a veritable Serengeti of wildlife feed breed and thrive Since 1972 vast tracts of our nation s oceans and coastal waters have been set aside as National Marine Sanctuaries California is fortunate to have four marine sanctuaries that run the length of our California coastline Think of them as large underwater national parks that are protected against over fishing and offshore oil drilling and other threats to marine life It s a daunting challenge because a burgeoning human population puts increasing pressure on the ocean and its resources This means that the safeguarding of our marine sanctuaries and the wildlife that depends on them has become a vital necessity Designated in 1981 because of its rich biological diversity the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary surrounds the wind swept peaks of the Farallon Islands off of the Golden Gate The sanctuary encompasses over 1 200 square miles of open ocean and coastal waters as well as bays and estuaries from Bodega Head in Sonoma County all the way down along the San Mateo County coast The islands in its midst serve as breeding grounds for 400 000 seabirds more seabirds than any other area in the contiguous United States Due to its location just next to the point where the continental shelf drops off into the deep ocean the sanctuary is in an upwelling zone a nutrient rich environment teeming with life The sanctuary waters and the Farallon Islands serve as a nursery for harbor seals elephant seals harbor porpoises Pacific white sided dolphins rockfish and seabirds The sanctuary is a favorite with all kinds of large marine animals including one of the largest remaining blue whale populations and one of the world s largest concentrations of great

    Original URL path: http://www.farallones.org/e_newsletter/2007-06/Delta.htm (2016-02-13)
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  • genentech
    the most common forms of litter found on the beach Throughout the day they learned that marine debris accounts for significant damage to our oceans and wildlife Comprised of both land and boating waste marine debris is a cumbersome but important issue to tackle Land waste illegal dumping storm drains litter sewer overflows accounts for as much as 80 of all marine debris Boating waste while less harmful percentage wise is still a killer abandoned fishing nets snare as many as 30 000 northern fur seals annually Other types of marine waste include off shore oil and gas exploration as well as galley waste from cargo ships and cruise liners Plastics are the worst offender unable to decompose naturally once they become a part of the oceanic environment they remain for countless years Plastic has been named the killer that keeps on killing For example if a seagull ingests plastic bottle caps mistaking them for fish eggs the gull will eventually perish As it decomposes the plastic is swept back out to sea by the tide to be consumed once again by another hungry seabird Furthermore once plastic bags reach the ocean floor immobile plants and animals such as coral can be trapped and suffocated The thirty Genentech volunteers including kids had a great time combing down the beach looking for debris One of their finds was a huge rubber tire After a hard morning s work cleaning up Dunes Beach they relaxed for a little lunch If you are interested in getting involved in cleaning our beaches contact FMSA s Volunteer Coordinator Joanne Mohr at jmohr farallones org We re trying to get people to understand that how we live affects our ocean Joanne says It s not just reduce reuse recycle it s rethink Plastic bags thankfully are

    Original URL path: http://www.farallones.org/e_newsletter/2007-06/genentech.htm (2016-02-13)
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  • Sonoma
    Golden Gate northward all the way to Bodega Bay In 1989 the Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary was created to similarly protect an undersea island rich in marine life These nearby national parks of the sea currently extend permanent protection from toxic discharges and oil spills associated with offshore drilling throughout a broad swath of ocean as far north as Bodega Bay Within each of our National Marine Sanctuaries virtually all forms of public use continue including fishing boating and diving under already existing laws The priority in a sanctuary is that our marine wildlife and their habitats will at last be sheltered from the high spill risks serious water pollution and damage to fragile ecosystems that would inevitably result from the risky pursuit of what is estimated to only be a marginal offshore hydrocarbon potential at best The change in Congress offers the promise of new environmental protection and puts the permanent stewardship of new coastal areas including Sonoma suddenly within reach Rep Lynn Woolsey D Petaluma joined by Maryland Republican Wayne Gilchrest and supported by Rep Mike Thompson D St Helena are carrying a bipartisan bill HR 1187 which would for the first time extend the boundaries of our present National Marine Sanctuaries northward to just beyond Point Arena in Mendocino County Strong local support for enactment of HR 1187 has come from the counties of Mendocino Sonoma Marin and San Francisco as well as from commercial fishermen marine scientists conservation groups the California State Lands Commission and the Coastal Commission Only last minute intervention by last year s lame duck chairman of the House Resources Committee Richard Pombo stopped a similar bill from moving in December but now the time is ripe for passage Marine scientists tell us that the unique oceanic upwelling system that lifts nutrient

    Original URL path: http://www.farallones.org/e_newsletter/2007-06/Sonoma.htm (2016-02-13)
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