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  • John Burton Designation
    course is now in the Senate brought the issue to my attention Community activists were concerned about the possibility of oil spills and other threats to our coastline we listened and went to work on it We were working with Stuart Eizenstat who was the Domestic Affairs and Policy Advisor to President Carter It was Carter s last act in January of 1981 just before Ronald Reagan took over the White House I remember getting a call from Stuart Eizenstat He was basically packing up his boxes to leave the White House but kept on the President to sign the legislation designating the Sanctuary and ensuring the protection of the California coast He called me up and said I don t know if you owe me or I owe you but we re even now And the President signed the proclamation and that was that Why was the designation of the Sanctuary important to you It provided protection around the Farallon islands and that was important to our constituents Did you face opposition in your efforts Were there people opposed to the designation It was just a matter of trying to have something happen through the bureaucracy I clearly remember that last minute phone call from Stu Eizenstat because he was damn near just walking out the door of the White House It was clear that something should be done I remember we just kept pushing on the issue with Stu Eizenstat and he was able to prevail in convincing President Carter Do you feel that the threat of offshore oil drilling contributed to the designation Along that same line do you think the threat of offshore oil drilling contributed to the birth of the environmental movement Well back in the 60 s when there was a big oil spill

    Original URL path: http://www.farallones.org/e_newsletter/2006-04/JohnBurtonDesignation.htm (2016-02-13)
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  • La Jolla Seals
    month use the beach for seal watching The SEALS program here in Bolinas Lagoon and Tomales Bay was established to document and reduce the impact of human activity on harbor seals much as the local volunteers in San Diego document and educate seal watchers The proximity of visitors often alarms a seal colony If the seals go into the water for safety their important resting time is disrupted and pups can become separated from their mothers Eventually chronic disturbance and its resulting flushing of the seals may result in a reduced birth rate and even abandonment of the haul out sites altogether There are two opposing sides on the battle of beach access rights the shared use group and the joint use group Shared use of the beach is advocated for by those who wish the area to be secured for the seals It involves allowing seal watching from the coastal wall and protecting the seals hauled out on the beach Alternatively others who wish to use the beach and water for recreation and swimming propose a joint use policy Those that want a joint use of the beach claim the seals will simply haul out elsewhere This is disputed by those that wish to see a protected area for the seals who state that nearby rocky haul outs are subject to large surf during pupping and nursing season Joint use of the beach is considered tantamount to forcing the seals to leave the area by the shared use group Download the Meeting Guide for Joint Use document here The clash between human and animal use of resources has been seen on many occasions from the sea lions at Pier 39 to the sea lions at Moss Landing When sea lions first came to Pier 39 there was some initial

    Original URL path: http://www.farallones.org/e_newsletter/2006-04/LaJollaSeals.htm (2016-02-13)
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  • Beachwatch volunteer George Peterson
    genetic thing Not that his family is from the coast but generations of land locked Petersons produced a man who was determined to live by the ocean and escape the minor celebrity shadow of his father He came to California and eventually moved from LA to the Bay Area The Bay Area particularily appealed to him because of its diversity There s lots more interesting things out here Like in Ohio in my profession there might be one black psychologist in the whole state It s a lot more cosmopolitan here lots more things to do Why did you decide to volunteer with Beach Watch I was interested in doing something with research I ve been off work for a couple years and needed something to do with my time and I was burnt out on people I was tired of helping people before dealing with people s problems so I figured animals might be cool It s interesting to imagine George being burnt out on people as he is very flexible and showcases a great sense of humor even when we are rained out of our cafe spot and have to continue the interview in the car I ask George to tell me about his typical Beach Watch survey He gets up at 6 30 am on a Saturday to leave the house in Oakland at 7 30 and get to his beach 405 St Francis beach at Half Moon Bay at 8 30 am to start his survey with his two partners We get ourselves organized at the picnic tables figure out who will do what I ve been the clicker counter and also the photographer Our beach has a lot of live gulls a lot of them Evidentily there used to be a dump at the end of the beach and the gulls still roost there so there are anywhere from 5 6 7 thousand gulls sunning themselves What s the most interesting thing you ve found We did run into a dead California Sea lion It was not quite as long as that car he says as he points to a compact sedan It was interesting to find it although it was a little funky smelly And it was the first sea lion we found on our beach although we had seen one on our training We saw bottlenose dolphins swimming along the surf when we first did a training run and then we have nesting snowy plovers down the way which are roped off to protect them When I ask George whether it s helpful or hindering to work with new Beach Watch volunteers he pauses to think It s helpful because we re all learning together and helping each other A veteran might come in handy if they re very knowledgable about the birds but other than that it s not hard work identifying It s not rocket science It gets easier and better over time George has a doctorate in mental heatlth and

    Original URL path: http://www.farallones.org/e_newsletter/2006-04/BeachwatchvolunteerGeorgePeterson.htm (2016-02-13)
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  • Klamath Salmon
    scientists required to gain the maximum production of salmon over time under normal conditions in the Klamath It is not a minimum number needed for survival of the fish which would be far less Indeed in many of the years when the floor was not reached the returning spawners of that year produced some of the largest runs ever indicating that conditions in the river are essential to successful reproduction But in 2005 27 000 spawned naturally and only 29 000 were predicted for this year Three straight years of falling below the management threshold of 35 000 triggers a federal conservation alert and conservation measures begin Fishermen blame government officials for failing to solve the Klamath s river s problems early on Commercial fishing organizations and environmental groups sued the U S Bureau of Reclamation in 2002 charging that the government s plan to wait eight years was insufficient to ensure the salmon s survival U S District Court Judge Saundra Armstrong ruled in March that the U S Bureau of Reclamation had an obligation to send enough water down the Klamath River for threatened coho salmon this year that overruled agriculture s water rights The Justice Department plans to ask Judge Armstrong to reconsider her decision members of Congress learned on Monday April 10 much to the dismay of the fishing and environmental groups which initiated the lawsuit Fishermen learn to live with the vagaries of nature including cycles of fish production and regulatory restraint to avoid overfishing but what they can t live with is a government that deprives a salmon river of its water and does nothing for four years but watch fish die in the parasite infested cesspool the Klamath became said Zeke Grader the executive director of the Pacific Coast Federation of Fisherman s

    Original URL path: http://www.farallones.org/e_newsletter/2006-04/KlamathSalmon.htm (2016-02-13)
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  • commonmurrerestorationproject
    Kress who heads Audubon s Seabird Restoration Program first used the technique to successfully revive puffin colonies off the coast of Maine His other current projects include restoring tern colonies to the northern Atlantic seaboard and bringing back the Bermuda petrel a bird thought to have gone extinct 300 years ago The technique involves using painted bird decoys and other simulation devices to lure the birds back to historic breeding spots Because a highly colonial bird like the Common Murre prefers the safety of a large group painted decoys are placed to give the allure of a thriving colony CD players and three sided mirrors are also used so that the murres hear familiar calls and see other moving birds The initial success of the Murre Project was startling We thought it would take several years before the murres would breed said Gerry McChesney Director of the Common Murre Restoration Project It had been ten years since murres had laid any eggs on Devil s Slide Rock But the murres started coming back the first day the decoys were deployed That first year six breeding pairs fledged three chicks The goal of the project McChesney said was to establish 100 nesting pairs in ten years It only took five years to reach that goal and since then the colony has maintained at least 100 pairs peaking in 2004 at 190 pairs In 2005 the colony at San Pedro Rock had grown to such numbers that decoys were no longer needed and this year marks the first year that no decoys will be used at Devil s Slide Rock This is a big evaluation year since this will be the first year without decoys on the rock Our strong belief McChesney said is that live birds on the rock have a

    Original URL path: http://www.farallones.org/e_newsletter/2006-03/commonmurrerestorationproject.htm (2016-02-13)
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  • Offshore drilling plan
    Sen Mel Martinez of Florida along with Florida Democrat Sen Bill Nelson have been advocating for a 260 mile limit Seeing the imbroglio developing over leasing off their coast they are now seeking to permanently protect Florida s coastline So the proposals and the mark ups have been going back and forth but no one is recognizing the fact that the open waters boundaries are largely fictional when it comes to an actual oil spill The Bush Administration recently unveiled an aggressive plan for offshore drilling along many of America s most sensitive coastlines and the fate of your own favorite beaches and coastal parklands will be decided very soon The jurisdiction of California waters is only three miles form the shoreline The federal government has jurisdiction beyond the three mile limit They are betting that Californians won t mind oilrigs so far off the coast that they can t be seen from shore We need to take action You can help determine the future of our nation s natural treasures by letting the Department of Interior know that you want your coast protected All of the recently unveiled offshore drilling proposals for the five year period between 2007 and 2012 are included in the Interior Department s newly proposed Five Year Offshore Leasing Program Comments on this proposal are being sought until April 10 2006 Your own comments are very important because without them Administration officials will simply cite the support of the oil and gas industry as a rationale for drilling and go ahead with their drilling plan You can easily comment here The newly proposed Bush Five Year offshore drilling plan for the first time would open long protected waters to the oil industry The sensitive areas to be opened for drilling include Florida s Gulf Coast and in the fragile Thousand Islands area just north of the Florida Keys and areas off Virginia and along the Mid Atlantic coast Also targeted is the lush ecosystem of Bristol Bay in Alaska s Bering Sea home to large populations of marine mammals seabirds crab the world s largest Sockeye salmon run and also provides important habitat to the critically endangered North Pacific Right whale The aggressive new Bush drilling plan anticipates that both the annual congressional moratorium and the presidential withdrawals will soon be lifted and that even our most sensitive fisheries and coastal waters would then be opened to oil rigs and associated routine pollution The White House is also continuing its push for drilling in the Arctic waters of the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas which provide important habitat for endangered Bowhead Beluga Gray and Orca whales Polar bears walrus where no oil spill cleanup technology has been developed to respond to oil spills in the prevalent broken sea ice conditions Just a few weeks ago in his State of the Union message the president spoke disparagingly of America s addiction to oil suggesting that he is determined to do something about it He called for new

    Original URL path: http://www.farallones.org/e_newsletter/2006-03/Offshoredrillingplan.htm (2016-02-13)
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  • judyrogerszunicafe
    to the public where folks may be less likely to accept limitations in their choices than they may in a restaurant That s the real battle line How do you educate your waitstaff Our menu changes every day so half an hour before service each day we cook samples of each dish and have a meeting with the wait staff Anything that s not standard we explain in great length This kind of fish is comes from here here s what the name means we tell them exactly how it is prepared If we do a dish with a fish that is considered a hot button in the Bay Area we explain to them why we are comfortable serving this dish Again as far as awareness teaching the chefs like me I give a lot of credit to Paul Johnson of Monterey Fish Market The seafood issue is tricky it s so dynamic What s sustainable changes over the years and from ocean to ocean When I wrote the recipes for my cookbook by the time the book was to be published some of the dishes had to be changed because they called for seafood that was no longer sustainable Why did you join the FMSA board They asked me and I said yes Five or six years ago I was talking to Paul Johnson one of the most forward thinking fishbrokers in the Bay Area He and I go way back to Chez Panisse days when he was their fishbroker Paul asked me if I would take part in OceanFest FMSA s annual event We couldn t spare anyone from the restaurant so my husband and I manned the Zuni booth We had a lot of fun because it s not a high end fancy charity thing It s very focused on this idea that we all need to care about the ocean which is filled with surprises and trreasures There were young families older people kids People were dressed comfortably and the whole thing was so happy and unpretentious It struck me as a terrific grass rootsy thing and I thought we should participate every year OceanFest appeals to me as perfect event with an uncomplicated and positive message It s so really effective It makes people concerned about the ocean in an accessible way So that s how I met some of the people on the board They asked us to do it again the next year and eventually dropped by Zuni and asked me to be on the board Why do you care about sustainability The same reason I care about clean air or wilderness The oceans are a gift a treasure and it s just wrong selfish to squander them It s just right to be concerned in this way that these resources are not pointlessly squandered but treasured I will say I ve witnessed a lot of change since I was cooking at Chez Panisse in 1978 I can remember what came in the

    Original URL path: http://www.farallones.org/e_newsletter/2006-03/zunicafesjudyrogers.htm (2016-02-13)
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  • Farallones Marine Sanctuary Association :: E-Newsletter :: February 2006 :: An Interview with the Honorable Senator Barbara Boxer
    Senator Milton Marks and San Francisco Mayor Dianne Feinstein also worked hard to oppose offshore oil drilling We also owe a big thanks to the Bay Area environmental community including long time marine advocates and my good friends Warner Chabot Richard Charter and Zeke Grader Pacific Coast Federation of Fishermen s Associations LH How did the threat of offshore oil drilling contribute to the nascent environmental movement BB The oil spill hit home for Californians who mobilized to protect our coast after witnessing the tragic devastation caused by the oil spill in 1969 The citizen response to this spill was overwhelming and the movement grew during the 1980s and 1990s as offshore oil development was again proposed by the federal government When I went to Congress we worked hard every year to ensure permanent protection for the California coast from offshore drilling This is a constant battle LH In your opinion how have we progressed in terms of protecting our coast since the early 80s BB I am encouraged to say that we have progressed in the last 25 years The Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary was established in 1981 and the Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary was designated eight years later The Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary quickly followed As a Congresswoman I was proud to sponsor a bill in 1989 that amended the 1972 Marine Protection Research and Sanctuaries Act to prohibit oil or gas exploration in national marine sanctuaries In 1996 President Clinton issued an executive order to permanently protect the coast of California from offshore oil and gas drilling Every year that I have served in Congress I have worked for coastal protection Just last year Congresswoman Lynn Woolsey and I introduced legislation to expand the Gulf of the Farallones and Cordell Bank national

    Original URL path: http://www.farallones.org/e_newsletter/2006-02/barbaraboxer.htm (2016-02-13)
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