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  • Farallones Marine Sanctuary Association :: E-Newsletter :: February 2006 :: Report Card
    What s with this administration and international treaties The U S had steadfastly refused to become a party to the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea The treaty provides new universal legal controls for the management of marine natural resources and the control of pollution Despite overwhelming support from a diverse array of interests including offshore energy maritime transportation commerce and shipbuilding the Senate has yet to schedule the convention for a floor vote and more vigorous support from the Administration is needed The declining health of the world s oceans is a global concern and the United States could and should become a world leader to ensure protection of our marine resources New Funding for Ocean Policy and Programs F Funding for essential ocean programs remains woefully insufficient and is far outpaced by current and future challenges Failure to provide even the modest funding increase recommended by the Commissions compounded by budget cuts in important ocean programs the National Marine Sanctuary Program s budget was cut by a whopping 32 this year jeopardizes the economic and ecological benefits our nation receives from its ocean and its coasts New investments must be made so that we can address ocean and coastal issues effectively National Ocean Governance Reform D Our oceans are in trouble and the declining health of ocean and coastal ecosystems is due to fragmented laws overlapping jurisdictions and the absence of a clear ocean policy The steps taken to date do not meet the criteria set forth by the two ocean commissions Despite pending legislation and efforts of the Committee legislative and administrative reforms addressing organizational deficiencies in NOAA and mandatory interagency coordination and integration of ocean related programs have been completely inadequate We need a stronger NOAA capable of implementing an ecosystem based management

    Original URL path: http://www.farallones.org/e_newsletter/2006-02/reportcard.htm (2016-02-13)
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  • Farallones Marine Sanctuary Association :: E-Newsletter :: February 2006 :: Volunteer Spotlight: Keary and Sally Sorenson
    really ours That s how it started MFN Tell me an interesting story about what you ve found on your beach Keary For me it s gotta be the minke Because we reduced it down to nothing but bone and we got to see exactly what s inside So now when I look into a baleen beak I know exactly what s there Working with Ray Ray Bones Bandar Field Associate Department of Ornithology and Mammology with California Academy of Sciences Sally What a blast Keary You get an intricate look at the animals that we re supposed to study When we find small bits and pieces on our beach survey we know what they are One of the things that we re supposed to strive for is accuracy Accuracy accuracy accuracy That s one of the things that I set out to do with this Is learn every single solitary animal in the ocean that we re gonna come across and be able to identify it by just tiny little bits and pieces With the introduction of birds she and I received it opened up a whole new world to us Sally Last March the 8th something happened MFN What happened Keary It started off with boredom overtaking us while doing SEAL watch because there was only one seal All of a sudden there s this bird struggling in the water I saved it from a flock of Western Gulls I ran back and handed it to her and said Figure it out I m going to get the ranger I ran a mile away and came back with the ranger Just as we came out there was a BBBBSSSTTTT grating sound And off the cliff 200 feet away from us and a hundred feet above us this PT cruiser comes flying off the cliff it came down hit a rock flipped over hit another rock flipped over and hit a third rock went up and spun like a football and came down and stuck itself between two rocks Keary motions wildly to illustrate the car accident Keary Both people died inside of it Everyone else took off and left her and I on the beach Sally With all these tourists and the injured grebe Keary And the harbor seals are starting to haul out because the sun s going down And now all of a sudden we ve got seals on the beach that we have to keep the tourists away from and they re there because the helicopters down there and they re using our telescopes to look inside the car to see the dead people MFN No That s awful Sally I just finally got fed up so I gathered them all up and damn near plopped them down Keary She had about 30 people in a circle and started showing them this bird She s never seen this bird before in her life and pulls the bird book out and starts explaining what the bird

    Original URL path: http://www.farallones.org/e_newsletter/2006-02/kearyandsally.htm (2016-02-13)
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  • Farallones Marine Sanctuary Association :: E-Newsletter :: February 2006 :: Mavericks - the environmental costs of the contests
    future The Sanctuary was incorrectly listed as a supporter of the contest on the Mavericks website when in fact the Sanctuary s role was to observe the event and document the environmental impacts hoping to make suggestions for lowering the environmental impact in upcoming years The Sanctuary observers recorded some disturbing numbers Volunteers recorded over 77 people in the sensitive rocky intertidal during high tide and over 398 people were trampling vegetation and creatures by low tide in their attempt to see the surfers better People tossed footballs tramped the tidepools with walkers and strollers and a few people rode their bikes over the rocks unaware of the creatures they were crushing underfoot Tidepool etiquette calls for watching where you step to avoid trampling kelp algae striped shore crabs turban snails sea stars aggregate anemones and the plethora of life within the rocky intertidal but the organizers of the event did nothing to prevent people from trampling the creatures in the Fitzgerald Marine Reserve It is hoped that roping off the area or educating the public about the sensitivity of the habitat will avert future possible damage Despite previous warnings one helicopter flew below 50 feet above the water flushing hundreds of birds while trying to capture excellent footage of the surfers The majority of helicopters stayed well away from the no fly zone Two dogs were seen off leash chasing hundreds of birds from the tidepools At the end of the event people skidded off from their beach spots and created small rubble avalanches contributing to the erosion of the hillside The highly erodable cliffs were hazardous to people as well as several people were hit by falling rocks when part of the cliffside crumbled including one woman who had to be hospitalized While organizers promised to replant trampled

    Original URL path: http://www.farallones.org/e_newsletter/2006-02/Mavericksenvironmentaldamage.htm (2016-02-13)
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  • Farallones Marine Sanctuary Association :: E-Newsletter :: January 2006 :: Successes of the Sanctuary: The Luckenbach
    Salvage for surface and saturation divers and equipment The engineering firm PCCI provided technical support and computer imagery needed to piece together the pictures of how the wreck lay Based on diver reports remotely operated vehicle ROV video old vessel blueprints and sidescan sonar images engineers developed three dimensional computer simulated images of the wreck and debris field hull cross sections and interior compartments Lightering Operations In the midnight hours of May 26th 2002 the 400 foot by 100 foot Crowley Maritime support barge CMC 450 10 steamed out of San Francisco Seven hours later six anchors each weighing 15 000 or 20 000 pounds were set High seas plagued the project with sea heights of 15 17 foot swells and wind speeds of 45 knots To ease the strain on the barge s anchor cables the tug Gladiator its tow wire linked to the barge maintained a steady one knot speed 24 hours per day into heavy oncoming swells On Saturday June 8th huge seas hammered the barge Despite the tug a fair lead tore and two of the anchor cables failed The barge sought the safety of Drake s Bay where it hunkered down unable to enter San Francisco Bay which had been closed due to extreme sea conditions at the bar When the seas subsided the vessel put into port Five days later the repairs completed Captain Dan Porter steered her back out to resume operations Meanwhile NOAA was busy with weather forecasting and estimating oil trajectories in the event of a release Once at sea the crew lost no time deploying the ROV The ROV served as the divers guiding light in the murky depths recorded the divers work and probed cargo holds whose contents had destabilized The plan was to use 6 inch diameter hoses to siphon the oil up to the barge s topside collection tank Instead of encountering oil of a fluid viscosity the divers found oil that intense pressure cold and the passage of 50 years had transformed into the consistency of peanut butter The divers at first wielded steam wands to soften the sludge with unsatisfactory results and then used heat exchangers to liquefy the oil Bit by bit by trial error perseverance and innovation the engineers and others found the combination of tools and techniques that would ultimately prove successful Minor oil leaks occurred even before attempts at pumping had begun Initially oil rose in quarter sized tar balls which thinned into evanescent sheets of rainbow colors that were quickly dispersed by strong breezes before they could be collected At one point a slick 2 1 2 miles long formed If the consistency permitted the Oil Spill Response Vessels OSRV s standing by would deploy absorbent pads to soak up the oil Occasionally solid pancakes of oil a foot in diameter would float up which the crew retrieved with boathooks and nets Wildlife Magnet The wreck was a wildlife magnet It had become an artificial reef encrusted with ghostly pale

    Original URL path: http://www.farallones.org/e_newsletter/2006-01/Luckenbach.htm (2016-02-13)
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  • Farallones Marine Sanctuary Association :: E-Newsletter :: January 2006 :: Union Oil Spill Disaster Sparks a Movement
    rate was less than 30 percent for those who were treated Many more died on the beach and the detergents used to disperse the oil threatened many birds that had managed to survive the oil The chemicals robbed feathers of the natural waterproofing used to keep seabirds afloat Union Oil s Platform A ruptured because of inadequate protective casing The oil company had been given special permission by the U S Geological Survey to cut corners and operate the platform with casings below federal and California standards Because the oil rig was beyond California s three mile coastal zone the rig did not have to comply with state standards People were saddened and outraged by the incident Many consider the publicity surrounding the spill a major impetus to the environmental movement In the spring following the oil spill Earth Day was born nationwide Only days after the spill began Get Oil Out GOO was founded in Santa Barbara Founder Bud Bottoms urged the public to cut down on driving burn oil company credit cards and boycott gas stations associated with offshore drilling Volunteers helped the organization gather 100 000 signatures on a petition banning offshore oil drilling Union Oil suffered millions in losses from the clean up effort payments to fishermen and local businesses and lawsuits The reputation of oil companies had changed irrevocably Said Fred L Hartley president of Union Oil I don t like to call it a disaster because there has been no loss of human life I am amazed at the publicity for the loss of a few birds Santa Barbara NewsPress Editor Thomas Storke Never in my lifetime have I ever seen such an aroused populace at the grassroots level This oil pollution has done something that I have never seen it has united citizens

    Original URL path: http://www.farallones.org/e_newsletter/2006-01/UnionOilspill.htm (2016-02-13)
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  • Farallones Marine Sanctuary Association :: E-Newsletter :: January 2006 :: Volunteer Spotlight: Sandcrab Monitor Francesca Hamilton
    or not which is a crab under 12 mm With the females we see if they are carrying eggs or not We then take three of each three males three females and three females with eggs and we take them back to the Academy and look for parasites How can you tell the male crabs apart from the females I think you lift up their tails and if they have hair on their telsons it s a female and if it doesn t it s a male What happens when it s cold and foggy or stormy at the beach Do you still go out and monitor Yeah we keep truckin and still go Why do you think it s important to monitor sand crabs at the beach I think that sand crabs are pretty low on the food chain If you don t have sand crabs then the birds don t have anything to eat They re kind of indicators of things that may be wrong with the beach or the water or like global warming Do you think that data collected by trained students is reliable accurate data Of course it is Since we re students we re trying hard not to mess up We don t always have opportunities to participate in real science projects so we want to make sure things are accurate What do you like most about monitoring I like learning about the sand crabs at ocean beach When I was younger I used to play with them It is interesting to see how many there are it s amazing sometimes we would catch 100 in one sample What was your least favorite part about monitoring Sometimes I d have to get a little wet but that s ok for science I like being

    Original URL path: http://www.farallones.org/e_newsletter/2006-01/StudentMonitorFrancesca.htm (2016-02-13)
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  • Farallones Marine Sanctuary Association :: E-Newsletter :: January 2006 :: In the News: The Oldest and Fattest Females Produce the Best Offspring
    other young The implications for Fisheries Management could have staggering effects and the authors of the studies advise measures above and beyond just fishing limits The Magnuson Stevens Act MSA enacted in 1976 and amended in 1996 with the Sustainable Fisheries Act establishes a national framework for conserving and managing marine fisheries It s power to stop overfishing was tested this past year The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration received an unprecedented number of negative comments from the public regarding proposed changes to the National Standard One the part of the MSA that governs the principles of management of the nation s fisheries With the overwhelming majority of the comments supporting the strengthening of the National Standard One NOAA reinstated the MSA with language emphasizing the vital role of ecosystem based approaches to fisheries management The authors of Maintaining Old Growth Age Structure Implications for Fisheries Management postulate that even fishing at sustainable levels ensures there are not as many big fish left in a population Bigger female fish produce more viable eggs and at much greater quantities Since a 40 cm bocaccio rockfish makes 200 000 eggs per year where a 80 cm fish produces over 2 million eggs Berkeley et al state In other words considering only fecundity per se let alone egg or larval quality a single 80 cm bocaccio is worth nearly ten 40 cm fish Old female rockfish s larvae have a better chance at life as they are born during peak food availability grow faster and survive at higher rates Yet the biggest fattest oldest females are the first to be fished out The authors maintain that marine protected areas are the most feasible route to protect fish whose populations depend on old fish to flourish in addition to regular fisheries management They postulate

    Original URL path: http://www.farallones.org/e_newsletter/2006-01/OldFatRockfish.htm (2016-02-13)
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  • Farallones Marine Sanctuary Association :: Education :: Sanctuary Explorers Camp :: Page 2
    ve learned about the ocean and wildlife so they ll want to take care of it too SEC youth participant I wish no loose nets would get in the ocean My promise is to teach fishermen about how loose nets catch animals and to pick up nets I see at the beach SEC youth participant Thank you for giving us this opportunity I m going to make sure I tell

    Original URL path: http://www.farallones.org/education/sanctuary_explorers_camp_2.php (2016-02-13)
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