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  • FIDM Museum Blog: February 2010
    Museum Permalink Comments 2 TrackBack 0 February 19 2010 Deconstruction in fashion These days it s fairly common to see garments incorporating raw edges exposed seams and distressed textiles Giving garments an unfinished appearance and hinting at the process of design and creation this style is usually called deconstructionism Initially intended to challenge widely held perceptions that garments must be flawlessly finished and enhance accepted definitions of beauty these design elements have become so widely utilized that they ve nearly lost the ability to shock and discomfort Only extreme deconstruction can stop us in our tracks such as the shredded and torn disarray of this Jean Paul Gaultier tank top Though it appears to have been severely mistreated this mesh tank was designed and manufactured to look tattered and torn Tank top Jean Paul Gaultier 2002 Gift of Lee Sheppard 2003 38 1 Continue reading Deconstruction in fashion Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments 8 TrackBack 0 February 17 2010 Rudi Gernreich mini dress Minidress Rudi Gernreich 1967 68 Bequest of the Rudi Gernreich Estate G85 331 1 Rudi Gernreich is probably best known for his most provocative creations such as the monokini or this military ensemble Though Gernreich was definitely interested in pushing fashion boundaries some of his more light hearted designs indicate an interest in non Western dress A specific focus on Asia reveals itself in the kabuki kimono and Japanese schoolgirl dresses all of which are loosely abstracted versions of garments worn in Japan Gernreich also produced collections based on Chinese opera costumes and traditional garments of Thailand Continue reading Rudi Gernreich mini dress Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments 2 TrackBack 0 February 12 2010 Alexander McQueen you will be missed All of us at the FIDM Museum were saddened and shocked to learn of Alexander McQueen s death Such a tremendous loss of creative talent is difficult to comprehend McQueen s aesthetic was provocative and never shy of pushing limits Individual garments recent examples include armadillo shoes and bone patterned suits were provocative as were the narratives that inspired each collection In addition to his creative abilities McQueen was a master of his craft with many calling him the finest woman s tailor of his generation For anyone who questions the impact of a provocative designer on everyday dress take a look at the jeans you re probably wearing right now If they re low waisted you have Alexander McQueen to thank as he first introduced the low cut bumster trouser in the mid nineties Continue reading Alexander McQueen you will be missed Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments 0 TrackBack 0 February 10 2010 Forbidden fruit A post from our Registrar Meghan Grossman Hansen Apples are grown around the world in thousands of varieties so it is not surprising that they are an undying symbol in mythology fairy tales and popular culture Putting aside the more contemporary connections to John Lennon and Macintosh computers the apple plays a pivotal role in the story of

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  • FIDM Museum Blog: January 2010
    for Mary Pickford in Coquette 1929 and Katharine Hepburn in Bringing Up Baby 1938 Greer and Travis Banton who had also worked at Paramount formed a short lived partnership in 1938 FIDM Museum owns the only known existing garment from this partnership a heavily embroidered and beaded jacket worn by Marlene Dietrich Evening Jacket worn by Marlene Dietrich Travis Banton Howard Greer c 1936 Department of Recreation and Parks City of Los Angeles FIDM Museum INV 1137 Continue reading Howard Greer Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments 2 TrackBack 0 January 22 2010 Polonaise bodice In 1872 fashion periodicals such as Godey s Lady s Book Peterson s Magazine and Harper s Bazaar were filled with references to various styles of the polonaise dress Whether a princess vest Russian or dolman polonaise the common characteristic was a gathered and bunched puff of fabric at the back Created through interior ties that pulled the fabric upwards the polonaise was essentially a fitted overdress worn over a skirt of matching or contrasting fabric In April of 1872 Harper s Bazaar suggested that a white polonaise was most useful as it may be worn effectively over black or colored silks as well as with the white skirt that complements it Polonaise bodice c 1869 1874 Gift of Anne Stampfer 94 661 2A C Continue reading Polonaise bodice Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments 3 TrackBack 0 January 21 2010 Betsy Bloomingdale interview in Vestoj Check out issue 1 of the new fashion periodical Vestoj The Journal of Sartorial Matters for an interview with Betsy Bloomingdale about wearing haute couture Titled Good Time and Passing Time A Conversation with Betsy Bloomingdale the interview was conducted by Kevin Jones and Christina Johnson co curators of the recent FIDM Museum exhibit High Style Betsy Bloomingdale and the Haute Couture You can read more about Vestoj here Their blog lists several stores in Europe that carry the journal but for those of us in other locations it might be a bit tricky to find a copy Post a comment letting us know where you found your copy As a special treat for our dedicated readers here is another ensemble featured in the High Style exhibition catalog Copies of the catalog are available from the FIDM Museum Shop Evening gown Marc Bohan for Christian Dior Spring Summer 1963 77 116 3 Gift of Mrs Alfred Bloomingdale 77 116 3 Detail of hand dyed silk organza flowers Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments 0 TrackBack 0 January 20 2010 Platform boots Platform boots 1972 73 Museum Purchase 2006 5 3AB With a heel of about 5 1 2 and a platform sole roughly 3 1 2 thick these dramatic boots are an extreme example of the platform shoes sandals and boots popular in the first half of the 1970s Perhaps even more notable then their extreme height is the fact that platform shoes of this era were worn by both men and women In a final flowering of the

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  • FIDM Museum Blog: December 2009
    Because smocking consisted of stitches passed over areas of gathered fabric it created stretch in an otherwise non stretch garment allowing for more freedom of movement This was important for those living in rural areas as manual labor was an undeniable fact of life In what could be considered an early example of work wear influencing fashion both smocks and smocking became an important part of fashionable dress beginning in the 1870s Smocks were adopted by those artists and bohemians interested in alternative styles of dress Decorative smocking appeared on garments worn by women and children such as the young girl s day dress of pink silk seen below Here smocking stitches create the bodice peaked waistline and fitted cuffs Day dress Attributed to Liberty Company London c 1893 97 Museum Purchase 2008 25 3 Continue reading Smocked frock Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments 4 TrackBack 0 December 18 2009 Kimono dressing gown Japanese styles are always attractive in negligees The Delineator April 1903 Kimono dressing gown c 1885 Gift of Anonymous Donor 80 40 1 Continue reading Kimono dressing gown Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments 9 TrackBack 0 December 16 2009 Details Make the Woman During the Great Depression 1929 1941 many women could not afford to purchase new clothing on a regular basis Instead women exploited the potential of accessories to update an old frock Carefully coordinated gloves hat handbag and shoes could be used to distract attention from a well worn day dress or suit Along with items such as a delicate handkerchief or modest jewelry these accessories were prized as a means to providing a moral uplift in difficult times Reframing necessity as a virtue fashion journalists suggested that these little triumphs i e accessories were actually the key to a fashionable wardrobe Because they framed the face and drew attention away from outdated or worn garments hats were a focal point of fashion throughout the 1930s Hat shape was dictated by personal taste and women could choose from a seemingly endless array of available styles Berets fedoras pillbox platter and sailor styles were all available along with many others Trim was also extremely varied with feathers bows beads artificial flowers or fruit ribbon and many other whimsical items appearing on 1930s headwear Many 1930s hats were worn at a jaunty angle Relatively simple turban shaped hats as seen in the FIDM Museum example below were also widely popular Coat and matching hat Wool boucle with rhinestones 1938 39 Gift of Anonymous Donor 2003 40 17AB Continue reading Details Make the Woman Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments 5 TrackBack 0 December 14 2009 Sonia Rykiel Sonia Rykiel s signature garment is the striped sweater Her earliest versions were shrunken body hugging poor boy sweaters with horizontal stripes designed in the early 1960s The use of soft knit fabric often striped became a trademark earning Rykiel the title Queen of Knitwear Rykiel intended her knitwear to take shape on the body so early in

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2009/12/index.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: November 2009
    her ready made and custom designed garments Within a few years Harp s designs had taken on a very different character Instead of merely incorporating bits and pieces of the past by using vintage textiles Harp started designing slinky overtly sexy dresses and separates that referenced the glamour of Old Hollywood Using silk textiles such as jersey crepe and chiffon Harp created what she called fantasy oriented mood clothes 3 These mood clothes often referenced 1930s evening wear as in the Holly s Harp bias cut dress seen here Evening dress Holly s Harp c 1978 Gift of Gloria Strasburger 99 655 3 Continue reading Holly s Harp Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments 10 TrackBack 0 November 19 2009 Catalog giveaway We have one signed copy of the High Style Betsy Bloomingdale and the Haute Couture catalog to giveaway Who signed the catalog you ask None other than the star of the show herself Betsy Bloomingdale The catalog is also available for purchase via the FIDM Museum Shop but wouldn t you rather have a signed copy Co authored by exhibition co curators Christina Johnson and Kevin Jones the catalog is 52 pages long It features amazing images of selected garments accessories and croquis included in the exhibition and a biographical essay of Betsy Bloomingdale If you d like a chance to win the catalog tell us which of our 60 blog posts is your favorite Post your response as a comment or send an email From the responses we will select a random winner We are happy to send the catalog overseas so readers outside of the United States don t hesitate to submit your thoughts All responses must be submitted by 12pm Pacific Time on November 24 2009 Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments 12 TrackBack 0 November 18 2009 Crinoline silhouette In the mid nineteenth century the fashionable female silhouette included voluminous full skirts To achieve the desired bell like skirt shape women relied on multiple layers of petticoats These petticoats were usually made of linen cotton or flannel though some were made of a stiff woven horsehair fabric called crinoline No matter what they were made of multiple layers of petticoats were cumbersome and heavy In 1856 the lightweight cage crinoline was introduced Consisting of a series of graduated steel rings or hoops strung together with thin strips of fabric tape the cage crinoline provided the same skirt shape with a much reduced weight Despite its ominous name it was actually considered a positive innovation because it was lightweight and relatively inexpensive A cage crinoline would have been worn underneath the striped wool cotton silk gauze two piece dress in the image below Two piece dress 1858 63 Gift of Vicki Nelson 83 530 1AB Continue reading Crinoline silhouette Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments 6 TrackBack 0 November 16 2009 The Couture Process Our current exhibition High Style Betsy Bloomingdale and the Haute Couture explores the world of haute couture through the experiences of

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2009/11/index.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: October 2009
    slideshow of additional images If you are interested in purchasing the exhibition catalog visit the FIDM Museum Shop Betsy Bloomingdale viewing the exhibition Continue reading High Style Betsy Bloomingdale and the Haute Couture opens Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments 8 TrackBack 0 October 21 2009 Preserving the Ann Getty Fashion Collection Behind every great museum is a great library The FIDM Museum is fortunate to have access to the FIDM Library which houses a great collection of design oriented books Today s post focuses on a preservation project completed by Rachel Clarke FIDM Library Catalog Coordinator It is a shorter version of an article published in the Spring Summer 2009 issue of the American Archivist Congratulations Rachel Continue reading Preserving the Ann Getty Fashion Collection Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments 1 TrackBack 0 October 19 2009 Opening this week High Style Betsy Bloomingdale and the Haute Couture October 21 2009 December 13 2009 Wednesday Sunday 10am 4pm Evening gown Gianfranco Ferre for Christian Dior 1989 90 Gift of Mrs Alfred Bloomingdale 2001 116 13 High Style Betsy Bloomingdale and the Haute Couture celebrates a donation of over 100 Haute Couture garments given to the FIDM Museum at the Fashion Institute of Design Merchandising over thirty years by International Best Dressed Hall of Fame icon Betsy Bloomingdale Mrs Bloomingdale married Alfred P Bloomingdale an heir to Bloomingdale s department stores and founder of Diners Club credit cards and has lived in Los Angeles her entire life She purchased French Haute Couture from 1961 to 1996 Her wardrobe includes designs by Marc Bohan and Gianfranco Ferré for Christian Dior Hubert de Givenchy Pierre Balmain Yves Saint Laurent André Courrèges James Galanos Adolfo Oscar de la Renta and Valentino This exhibition includes over 60 ensembles and describes the process of Haute Couture showcases her favorite designers and examines her personal style and lifestyle Supplementary exhibition materials include hand drawn croquis colored sketches with attached fabric swatches contemporary photographs of Mrs Bloomingdale at many international events including the wedding of Prince Charles and Princess Diana as well as magazine layouts illustrating garments she ordered Accompanying the exhibition is a catalog and video documentary which includes interviews with Mrs Bloomingdale Hubert de Givenchy James Galanos Oscar de la Renta Adolfo and Francois Lesage among others Click here for our address and directions Hope to see you there Detail of 2001 116 13 Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments 0 TrackBack 0 October 16 2009 Wiener Werkstatte textiles Remember this post about found textiles Today s post features a group of Wiener Werkstatte textiles from the same collection The Wiener Werkstatte Vienna Workshop was an artistic collective based on an interest in eliminating the gap between fine art and crafts Founded in 1903 by architect Josef Hoffman and artist Kolomon Moser the Wiener Werkstatte s goal was to design and produce all objects needed in daily life Consisting of a design school studios for established designers a production workshop and retail outlet the Wiener

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  • FIDM Museum Blog: September 2009
    bowl people over In a day when most fashions seem stamped out by cooky cutters hers look as if they had been touched by human hands 3 Coat Bonnie Cashin for Sills Co 1953 1957 Gift of Elenore Berman 2004 832 2 Detail of 2004 832 2 1 Morris Bernadine For Bonnie Cashin It s a Time to Shine New York Times 5 May 1972 36 2 Steele Valerie Women of Fashion Twentieth Century Designers New York Rizzoli 1991 143 3 Morris Bernadine Fashion Catches up to Cashin New York Times 3 May 1968 56 Iverson Stephanie Day Practical Dreamer New York Museum at FIT 2000 Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments 0 TrackBack 0 September 21 2009 Tina Leser Tina Leser 1910 1986 is among the generation of American designers credited with creating and popularizing the American Look during and immediately after World War II Along with designers such as Carolyn Schnurer Louella Ballerino and Claire McCardell Leser designed casual ready to wear clothing inspired by non Western garments and textiles Based in New York Leser s extensive world travels informed her designs and she often spoke on the subject of interpreting non Western artistic traditions into contemporary fashions Though she is less well known today when Leser was actively designing she was noted for her casual clothes defined with an air of elegance 1 and for the overall wearability of her creations The Tina Leser skirt seen in these photos is labeled a Tina Leser Original During the 1950s if a designer s name was paired with original on the garment label it designated a ready to wear garment produced in extremely limited quantities and available only at select stores Bridging the gap between custom made haute couture and widely available ready to wear the buyer of an original garment was unlikely to encounter another women wearing the same model This labeling technique was used by numerous American designers including Adrian A brief 1955 New York Times article on this exact skirt stated that the tape lace embellishment at the hips was hand made by nuns in a Flanders convent Leser designed a pattern for the lace which then took 10 days for 3 nuns to complete The article comments on the exclusivity of the skirt noting that it had limited availability and would be a suitable gift to be handed down from mother to daughter 2 The retail price was 195 probably a bargain for the amount of handwork involved Skirt Tina Leser Original c 1955 Gift of Mrs Carita Kadison 2003 792 5 Detail of 2003 792 5 1 Designer s Pattern Los Angeles Times 8 Oct 1950 C9 2 From a Belgian Convent New York Times 17 Dec 1955 20 Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments 2 TrackBack 0 September 18 2009 Would you believe it s paper As many of our readers may already know season 6 of Project Runway was filmed at FIDM In the most recent episode season 6 episode 5 the contestants used pages from the Los Angeles Times to create ripped from the headlines garments You can check out their creations here As mentioned in the episode by Tim Gunn and Los Angeles Times fashion critic Booth Moore paper garments have a prominent place in fashion history In March 1966 Scott Paper Company now Kimberly Clark introduced a disposable paper dress called the Paper Caper as a promotional tool Available via mail order for 1 25 the sleeveless A line mini dress was available in two patterns red bandana print or black and white Op Art print Though intended as an advertising gimmick the paper dress somehow captured the feeling of the moment and became an instant success Numerous designers and manufacturers picked up on the trend and produced all manner of paper garments including jumpsuits swimsuits evening gowns and even underwear through 1968 when the fad lost momentum Though it seems almost counter intuitive the central appeal of the paper dress was its disposability The paper dress was intended to be worn only a few times and then tossed in the garbage in favor of a new garment Even if you wanted to wash and re wear your paper dress it was not recommended as they tended to disintegrate on contact with water One advertisement from the Los Angeles Times even proclaimed they re guaranteed not to last 1 Made from a fire retardant non woven fiber called Kaycel the paper dress also tied in with the overall interest in newly developed man made materials that was so prominent in early to mid 1960s fashion Pushing this aesthetic interest even further were paper dresses that incorporated metallic or plastic elements To some extent buyers could personalize their paper dresses With a snip of the scissors a too long dress could be made shorter though not longer Though most paper dresses were printed with very contemporary patterns some manufacturers sold plain white paper dresses that could be individually decorated Given the short turnaround in manufacturing time the paper dress also served as a perfectly blank vehicle for self promotion or marketing and corporations such as Air India and Time magazine used paper garments as an advertising medium In November 1966 Andy Warhol decorated a plain paper dress with paper bananas and paint during an event at the Abraham Straus department store in Brooklyn Lesser known artists and graphic designers also got into the act as demonstrated by the Mystic Eye paper dress seen below It was one in a series of 4 Poster dresses created by the graphic designer Harry Gordon The FIDM Museum has a large collection of paper dresses In addition to the Harry Gordon dress featured below we ve posted two other paper dresses for your viewing pleasure How do they compare to the dresses created by the Project Runway crew We d love to know what you think Mystic eye paper dress Harry Gordon 1968 Museum Purchase 2004 5 35A Poster Dress packaging insert 1968 2004

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  • FIDM Museum Blog: August 2009
    and early twentieth century when women became interested in activities which required ease of movement such as bicycling tennis and dancing In conjunction with the emerging popularity of these pastimes a more streamlined feminine silhouette emerged Closely associated with the new silhouette was the Parisian designer Paul Poiret 1879 1944 Beginning in 1898 Poiret worked for the grand couturier Doucet though he soon moved to the House of Worth In 1903 Poiret s creation of a coat based on the shape of a kimono demonstrated that his aesthetic had evolved beyond that of his employer Charles Worth Worth s aesthetic depended on luxurious fabrics corseted silhouettes and a generous application of applied decoration Neither the client nor Worth appreciated Poiret s relatively simple coat so he left to open his own salon Looking back on this turning point in his 1931 autobiography King of Fashion Poiret wrote that he had become tired of the dominant aesthetic as all that was soft washed out and insipid was held in honour 2 Continue reading Paul Poiret King of Fashion Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments 1 TrackBack 0 August 18 2009 Thanks Thanks to Heather of the dress studies blog Worn Through for her complimentary review of this blog You can read the review here Earlier this year Worn Through featured an interview with our collections manager Christina Johnson You can read all three parts of that interview here Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments 2 TrackBack 0 August 17 2009 Found textiles All museum employees are charged with careful collection oversight We monitor temperature and humidity store objects with an eye to preventing damage while also trying to learn more about each object in the collection Despite these efforts we sometimes overlook fabulous objects hidden in plain sight Over the past few years we have updated our storage facilities through the installation of compact storage units The resulting upheaval caused us to look more closely at a collection of textile swatches stored in enormous albums These albums were stored on a shelf in the Study Collection and no one currently working in the FIDM Museum had ever taken more than a cursory look at the swatches within Once we started to look more carefully at the albums we were shocked and excited to see what we had been missing The albums were filled with small snippets of both dress and furnishing fabrics dating from the late nineteenth to the mid twentieth century Though many of the swatches were remarkable solely for their compelling design it was exciting to spot textiles that could be associated with specific designers and stylistic movements Some of the most important swatches are featured below La Foret printed textile Raoul Dufy c 1911 Gift of Robert Fortunoff 99 274 104 Raoul Dufy 1877 1953 was a French painter who met couturier Paul Poiret around 1910 Together they established a workshop for block printing textiles As a painter Dufy was associated with Fauvism a style of painting characterized by large areas of bold colorization and a certain rapidity and spontaneity in execution In his capacity as textile designer for Poiret Dufy created textiles featuring extravagant portrayals of natural forms which can be clearly linked to his paintings La Pensee printed textile Raoul Dufy c 1910 Gift of Robert Fortunoff 99 274 105 Dufy s textile designs for Poiret were inspiring and difficult to imitate In 1912 the French textile manufacturer Bianchini Ferier persuaded Dufy to leave Poiret as they were unable to find a similar talent Until 1928 Dufy worked exclusively for Bianchini Ferier While designing for Bianchini Ferier Dufy often referenced the designs created for Poiret Meanwhile Poiret continued to feature Dufy s textile designs as an integral part of his overall aesthetic In 1920 Poiret s summer collection exclusively utilized Dufy designed textiles 1 Printed textile Atelier Martine c 1911 99 274 100 Gift of Robert Fortunoff In addition to the short lived textile printing workshop he established with Raoul Dufy Paul Poiret also established the Atelier Martine in 1911 Comprised of young girls without formal artistic training the Atelier Martine functioned both as a design laboratory and workshop Students were sent out into the world to find inspiration for textile designs which were critiqued by both Poiret himself and visiting artists The hope was that these untrained students would create unique designs unfettered by ideas about design and artistic traditions Some of the resulting designs were turned into yardage which was then used in Poiret designed garments or for home decoration Check back later this week for an example of Poiret s garment design 1 Blausen Whitney and Sydonie Benét Bianchini Férier Contemporary Fashion Ed Taryn Benbow Pfalzgraf 2nd ed Detroit St James Press 2002 2 pp Gale Virtual Reference Library Gale Fashion Inst of Design Merchandising 17 Aug 2009 Poli Doretta Davanzo Twentieth century Fabrics European and American Designers and Manufactures Italy Skira 2007 Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments 4 TrackBack 0 August 14 2009 Mae West Mae West s 1893 1980 most famous attribute was her figure Buxom rounded and held in place by rigid corsets West s silhouette provoked a degree of outrage while also serving as her best publicity Her hourglass shape was immortalized in 1937 when the couturier Elsa Schiaparelli used West s silhouette as the basis for her Shocking perfume bottle Hired to design costumes for West s 1937 film Every Day s a Holiday the Paris based couturier would not travel to Hollywood and West could not travel to Paris A solution was reached whereby a torso based on West s measurements was sent to Schiaparelli s Paris workshop The resulting perfume bottle serves as an iconic representation of both Mae West and Elsa Schiaparelli Shocking by Schiaparelli c 1937 Gift of Annette Green F2005 860 820A Continue reading Mae West Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments 0 TrackBack 0 August 12 2009 Adrian Ltd What must be admired most in Adrian s fashions is their construction

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  • FIDM Museum Blog: July 2009
    structures shaped like small baskets extend the line of the dress horizontally emphasizing the hips This look hearkens back to the 18th century when panniers were worn on a regular basis by European and American women This historic reference was noted by American fashion writers who often referred to the robe de style as a quaint or period style dress Robe de style c 1923 Gift of Ms Sandra Coleman S2005 851 1 Continue reading Robe de style Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments 3 TrackBack 0 July 22 2009 Fashion and feathers Today hats are worn primarily on celebratory or festive occasions but in the 19th century hats and bonnets were an essential element of every woman s wardrobe Beginning in the 1890s and continuing until about 1915 many hats were extremely large and served as an ideal canvas on which to display a variety of trimmings feathers included Egret heron hummingbird pheasant ostrich seagull and peacock were all popular as sources of feathers though milliners did not limit themselves to these birds alone As you can see from the image below creative milliners went far beyond the use of a single elegant plume Sometimes an entire wing was given pride of place or even a full bird as in the example below Hat c 1905 Purchase 2008 25 17 Continue reading Fashion and feathers Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments 5 TrackBack 0 July 20 2009 Rudi Gernreich California based designer Rudi Gernreich 1922 1985 was no stranger to inciting controversy Often called America s most avant garde designer Gernreich pushed fashion into new arenas rather than mining its past for inspiration Gernreich s most notorious design the 1964 topless bathing suit bared the breasts of the wearer and was reportedly banned from beaches and retail stores In early 1970 he introduced the Unisex look which consisted of clothing intended to be worn interchangeably by both men and women Gernreich was also an advocate of the Total Look wherein hair makeup and clothing were carefully coordinated to harmonize with each other Military ensemble Rudi Gernreich 1970 Bequest of the Rudi Gernreich Estate G85 331 3A D Continue reading Rudi Gernreich Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments 3 TrackBack 0 July 15 2009 FIDM Museum Study Collection Did you know that the FIDM Museum has a Study Collection In addition to our Permanent Collection we have a Study Collection which is available for use by students and faculty of the Fashion Institute of Design Merchandising Students and faculty are invited to gently examine these garments as a way to better understand both construction and design Our Study Collection Manager regularly visits classrooms and works closely with instructors to integrate these items into the curriculum Garments in the Study Collection are chosen because of their design merit or importance to fashion history but they generally have a slight flaw which keeps them out of the Permanent Collection For example a rip faded colors or a slight flaw in construction would

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