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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Moschino
    career as a fashion illustrator for print publications and other Italian designers including Gianni Versace In 1983 he presented his first collection of women s clothing From the start his take on fashion was both humorous and provocative his first collection featured dresses patterned with tire tracks and candy box hats In addition to the Survival Jacket Moschino s Spring Summer 1991 collection featured a belt printed with the pun Waist of Money Stop the Fashion System was another favorite Moschino slogan one he used in ad campaigns and printed on garments For Moschino humor was a way to force fashion personalities and fashion consumers to consider the role of fashion consumption within a broader social context 1 Bannon Lisa The Next Decade If the Shoe Fits In the Future We May All Be Fashionable Wall Street Journal Eastern edition Feb 3 1993 R7 Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments 0 TrackBack 0 March 01 2013 Moschino Couture evening gown 1992 Made of rainbow hued silk satin this Moschino Couture evening gown was worn to an early 1990s costume ball Though we have few details about the event if all the costumes were this eye catching it was surely a splendid evening Any guesses as to the identity the wearer wanted to assume Think of a well known historical figure one who supposedly said Let them eat cake Evening gown Moschino Couture 1992 Gift of Eden Riegel 2010 1007 1 Continue reading Moschino Couture evening gown 1992 Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments 0 TrackBack 0 January 13 2010 Handbag variety Like shoes handbags and purses straddle the line between functional and decorative objects Though many women and some men consider them necessary containers for objects such as keys or money the sheer diversity of available styles demonstrates that handbags

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/moschino/ (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Mourning
    FIDM Museum has several jet trimmed garments including a reception gown by Charles Frederick Worth a mantle by Emile Pingat and the jacket above which was probably a mourning garment It is made of handmade floral embroidered black net embellished with velvet ribbons and jet beads Sautoir c 1885 Museum Purchase 2008 5 13 Jet jewelry enlivened drab black mourning garments in the later stages of mourning it could be faceted for added visual interest This necklace composed of a long rope of faceted jet beads with fringed triangular pendants at each end was worn draped over the wearer s neck with the ends hanging down the front of her gown below her knees Detail With its vivid red hue the velvet toque below could not be mistaken from mourning dress But by the 1880s jet was at the height of its popularity as a high fashion ornament Four rows of large faceted jet beads edge the front of the hat a few beads have fallen off over the years Toque American c 1885 Museum Purchase 2009 5 10 A black mesh overlay is embroidered with fringed roundels of small faceted jet beads and straw work knots But the fashion for jet inevitably passed and the decline of mourning rituals after World War I spelled the death of the Whitby jet industry Detail 1 Thomas N Bradley Bradley s new guide to Whitby Whitby T N Bradley 1884 27 28 Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments 0 May 29 2015 Fundraising Friday The Widow of Windsor It s Fundraising Friday The FIDM Museum is in the final months of a major fundraising campaign to purchase the Helen Larson Historic Fashion Collection a private collection of 1 200 historic garments and accessories from four centuries assembled by the late Helen Larson a collector from Whittier California Each Friday this blog will feature an exquisite piece from the collection with information on how you can make a donation to keep these one of a kind treasures together and housed in a public collection in Larson s native Southern California Dress c 1897 Helen Larson Historic Fashion Collection There s no mistaking the distinctive silhouette Standing just 4 7 tall with a 46 inch waist the elderly reclusive Queen Victoria 1819 1901 was known as the widow of Windsor After her beloved husband Prince Albert died prematurely in 1861 the heartbroken queen went into mourning for the rest of her long life At the time black clothing for women was reserved almost exclusively for mourning Recent widows wore garments of matte black fabrics like crepe devoid of ornamentation gradually re adopting colors and trimmings This gown of silk faille and crepe created decades after Albert s death is only somewhat enlivened by black beads and machine made lace A small peplum dates the ensemble to the late 1890s but it is otherwise typical of the Queen s habitual dress in the second half of her life Detail Perversely the Queen s refusal to

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/mourning/ (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Neckwear
    t require careful starching arranging and continual readjustment This 1818 image from a satirical essay called Neckclothitania or Tietania mocks the various and complicated methods of tying the neck cloth or cravat It was much easier to knot a neck tie in place securely tucking the ends inside the waistcoat and jacket The simplicity and speed with which a neck tie could be donned was a boon to men who

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/neckwear/ (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Nicolas Ghesquière
    116 4AB Cristobal Balenciaga was such a giant in the world of haute couture it s no surprise that his namesake house went into decline after his retirement in 1968 For decades the brand was largely dormant though the name survived by virtue of Balenciaga s reputation and the production of branded perfumes Though his haute couture salons were closed Balenciaga s influential legacy was undiminished Museum exhibitions celebrated his

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/nicolas-ghesqui%C3%A8re/ (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Norma Kamali
    1986 Gift of Liz Mazurski 2012 1142 71AB Norma Kamali s fringed two piece suit is a challenging slightly eccentric take on 1980s power dressing During the 1980s bland tailored skirt suits defined women s professional dress These power suits derived from men s business suits articulated the idea that dressing for workplace success meant dressing very much like a man Power suits with their sedate palette and uniform silhouette

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/norma-kamali/ (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Norman Norell
    throughout much of the 19th century these boots have undefined left and right soles Shoes with distinctly different shapes for the left and right food didn t became widespread until the late 19th century Continue reading Spring flowers Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments 1 TrackBack 0 August 25 2010 Norfolk jacket First appearing in the 1860s the Norfolk jacket is a durable loose fitting jacket designed to provide ease of movement to hunters and sportsmen Deriving its name from the Duke of Norfolk the jacket was reputedly created specifically for the Duke at his request Other origin stories suggest that the Norfolk jacket was created for the Prince of Wales but somehow became linked with the Duke of Norfolk Regardless of its origins the characteristics of the Norfolk jacket made it ideal for outdoor and sporting pursuits specifically hunting Constructed from rough woolen fabrics and buttoning to the collar the jacket was extremely warm and durable With a center back and two front pleats allowing for easy arm movements and large patch pockets providing extra storage it was widely adopted as sportswear or casual day wear by gentlemen of leisure when vacationing in the country Paired with a cap short knickerbockers rough woolen stockings and sturdy short boots the Norfolk jacket was suitable only for informal rural settings Unlike an urban suit Norfolk jackets weren t always paired with matching trousers Though fashion plates indicate the existence of matched Norfolk suits the jacket was also worn with knickerbockers cut from a different fabric Color also marked the Norfolk jacket as a casual garment Unlike urban suits which were almost uniformly black during the late 19th century Norfolk jackets were usually made from rustic woolen fabrics in earth tones of green or brown Because of their functionality Norfolk jackets were adopted by sportsmen of all varieties Always however they were associated with the well to do who could afford specialized garb for leisure activities This fashion plate from May 1901 features a golfer right clad in a Norfolk jacket and matching knickerbockers Dating from roughly 40 years after the origination of the Norfolk jacket this plate confirms the longevity of the style The jacket pictured here features all the classic characteristics of the Norfolk jacket including patch pockets front box pleats and a self belt Notice his cravat pin a pair of crossed golf clubs May 1901 The Sartorial Art Journal Continue reading Norfolk jacket Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments 3 TrackBack 0 April 23 2010 Norman Norell flower coat Flower power is usually associated with the late 1960s hippie aesthetic but flowers were actually a popular decorative motif throughout the decade The early years of the 1960s witnessed a proliferation of stylized and patently artificial floral forms while real or natural flowers dominated the late 1960s Often used as a motif in textile designs flowers also appeared as three dimensional embellishments on garments and accessories Elaborate headdresses and hair ornaments made particularly good use of artificial flowers during

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/norman-norell/ (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Old is new
    quickly realizes that fashion is a series of cyclical repetitions Contemporary silhouettes colors and design details reference recent and historic styles often with only slight modifications to bring a garment into the present moment This cycle isn t new or unique to contemporary culture documented revivals of historic fashions exist in the nineteenth century and earlier Fashion historian Barbara Baines has suggested that revivals of historic dress styles are due to a number of factors including nostalgia and an interest in associating oneself with specific perceived characteristics of the past In addition to these psychological factors concrete events like an archaeological discovery museum exhibition or period film can inspire a revival of historic styles 1 One of the most frequently occurring revivals is that of ancient Greek and Roman dress This can take the form of a draped garment inspired by Greek and Roman statuary or the presence of a motif like the Greek key In the nineteenth century the influence of Greek and Roman dress was seen in the slim light colored empire waist dresses popular at the beginning of the century and the artistic or aesthetic styles that emerged in the 1860s Also popular in the nineteenth century were jewelry and accessories inspired by the styles of ancient Greece Rome and other ancient cultures In 1864 Godey s Lady s Book noted the popularity of historic revivals in jewelry Roman Greek and Egyptian jewelry are greatly in demand 2 Silvered paper headdress c 1860 Museum Purchase 2008 25 2 Delicate headdresses made of jewels ribbons and real or artificial flowers and leaves were popular in the late 1850s and early 1860s These were worn primarily for evening or formal dress and often matched or complemented motifs seen on the dress itself Whether incorporating roses ribbons or the oak leaves seen here this style is a clear reference to the crowns seen on ancient Greek and Roman statuary In both ancient Greece and Rome wreaths of flowers or leaves were awarded to Olympic athletes military commanders and supreme rulers Oak leaves and acorns have a particular significance as they were sacred to the Greek god Zeus and his Roman equivalent Jupiter Like many consumer goods of the mid nineteenth century headdresses could be purchased at multiple price points The most lavish worn by royalty and wealthy aristocrats incorporated precious jewels gold and silver More modest headdresses were made of leftover ribbon and fresh flowers The silver paper headdress seen here was perhaps a less expensive version of the diamond headdresses worn by the upper echelons of society Like some of its more expensive cousins this delicate paper headdress was meant to tremble delicately when the wearer moved Each leaf and flower is wired to the headband so that the slightest movement creates a delicate trembling movement akin to the wind gently brushing the leaves of a tree 1 Baines Barbara Fashion Revivals from the Elizabethan Age to the Present Day London Batsford Ltd 1981 2 Fashions Godey s Lady

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/old-is-new/ (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Opera
    is typical of the kind traditionally worn onstage by Figaro the scheming hero of Pierre Augustin Caron de Beaumarchais plays The Barber of Seville and The Marriage of Figaro which were turned in to operas by Gioachino Rossini and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart The FIDM Museum is proud to exhibit it as part of the Los Angeles Opera s ongoing Figaro Unbound cultural festival Based on the dress of the Spanish majo a working class dandy the suit incorporates seventeenth century details such as slashed beribboned sleeves and laced up cuffs which survived in conservative Spain long after going out of style elsewhere In contrast to the opulence of the elaborately embroidered elite garments displayed elsewhere in the gallery actors in the wildly popular play wore rural Spanish accented dress which started a trend for rustic simplicity among the French aristocracy Figaro s adventures undermining his aristocratic employers sparked revolutionary tensions with real life rulers who tried unsuccessfully to ban the production The topsy turvy world of The Marriage of Figaro where it is impossible to tell boy from girl or maid from mistress has much in common with modern day Los Angeles In a town where dressing up means wearing your good jeans we can easily relate to the way Figaro made informal working class garments look chic Casual Fridays are common in the business world and many companies extend the ethos to the whole workweek The recent history of fashion is full of examples of the very rich imitating the very poor and the practice remains controversial think of Marc Jacobs grunge collection of 1992 or John Galliano s 2000 haute couture collection for Christian Dior inspired by the homeless At the same time though it s become much easier for the poor to imitate the dress of the

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/opera/ (2016-02-12)
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