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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Superdoll
    tall mannequin like dolls capture the spirit of the haute couture As you ll see in the images below every Superdoll wears a meticulously embellished ensemble From seductive evening wear to punk inspired day wear these dolls represent an array of styles The SPELLBOUND collection will be on view at the FIDM Museum through August 16 2014 See the extraordinary Superdolls Tuesday Saturday 10am 5pm This exhibition is free to the public L to R Charles Fegen Superdoll designer Barbara Bundy FIDM Museum Director Desmond Lingard Superdoll designer FIDM Museum Galleries 919 South Grand Avenue Los Angeles California 90015 Ground Floor Park Side 213 623 5821 Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments 3 TrackBack 0 July 22 2014 Debut Reception for SPELLBOUND Chalk White Couture Dolls by Superdoll Since 2005 London artists Desmond Lingard and Charles Fegen have designed The Sybarites fully articulated sixteen inch tall mannequin like dolls Dressed in hand crafted high fashion garments these collectibles capture the spirit of the world of haute couture This exhibition features their latest collection SPELLBOUND handmade Chalk White couture Superdolls On Thursday July 31 join Desmond Lingard Charles Fegen at the USA Debut Reception of SPELLBOUND handmade Chalk White couture dolls

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/superdoll/ (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Sweater
    s playful eye catching designs this question would be of little concern According to the designer herself people who wear Betsey Johnson don t get stuck in fashion says do this fashion says do that The important thing is to be playful And experiment 1 Like her clientele Johnson was aware that strict fashion rules had fallen by the wayside in favor of a more eclectic approach to fashion Instead

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/sweater/ (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Swimwear
    to unremarkable Bikinis or bikini like garments appear in ancient Roman murals and relatively modest two piece suits were worn in the 1930s but the scanty modern bikini didn t appear until 1946 Sources differ but it seems that the revealing swimsuit was introduced almost simultaneously in summer 1946 by haute couture designer Jacques Heim and engineer fashion designer Louis Réard Heim called his scanty two piece suit the atome while Réard labeled his the bikini Both names made reference to the US military s July 1946 nuclear tests on Bikini Atoll a low laying island located in the South Pacific Réard s name for the revealing swimsuit stuck and a new style of swimwear was born Bikini Gianni Versace Versace Mare c 1994 1999 Gift of Dorothy Washington Sorensen S2010 1110 83A D Continue reading Versace Mare bikini c 1994 Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments 0 TrackBack 0 July 03 2012 Swingin Summer Swingin Summer a collaboration between the FIDM Museum Shop and Clever Vintage Clothing pays homage to the influence of swimwear on fashion and culture On view in the FIDM Museum lobby through late July this installation of swimwear and casual fashions includes ensembles by Catalina Alfred Shaheen and the Kamehameha Garment Company This installation is FREE and open to the public Monday Friday 10 a m to 5 p m Selections from Swingin Summer are featured below Stop by the FIDM Museum lobby to see the full installation Ocean themed straw handbags from the 1950s The sequin embellished bag front was made in Japan and the green and gold seashell handbag back is from Texas Continue reading Swingin Summer Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments 2 TrackBack 0 May 25 2012 The start of summer The unofficial start of summer is just a few days away In the United States the Memorial Day holiday always the last Monday in May marks the beginning of the summer season Depending on where you live the climate may or may not cooperate No matter what the weather you re probably plotting a weekend getaway and plans for summer fun This blog post first published in 2009 examines a crucial component of the summer wardrobe swimwear Dating from the late 19th century this bathing suit is unlike any swimwear you d see on the beach today Made from a wool textile it looks more like a full length coat Read on to find out why 19th century women wore such modest swimwear Woman s bathing ensemble c 1875 Museum Purchase 2006 25 3AB Continue reading The start of summer Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments 0 TrackBack 0 March 20 2012 Spring flowers Spring is here Today March 20 is the first day of spring for those of us in the Northern Hemisphere Spring brings longer days warmer weather and a host of colorful blooms In celebration of spring s arrival we offer you an array of flowers from our collection Enjoy Evening boots 1850 55 Gift of Barbara

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/swimwear/ (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Sybil Connolly
    designer Connolly s designs were a hit with the American visitors and she was invited to the United Stated to present her work In March of 1953 Connolly arrived in Philadelphia to present a collection at Gimbels Department Store Inevitably the showing was scheduled for St Patrick s Day Though her first collection featured a variety of well received suits and day dresses it was a ball gown of finely

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/sybil-connolly/ (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Textile
    paid tribute to internationally known travel destinations Featuring approximately forty seven different patterns commemorating Palm Beach the French Riviera Bermuda the Catalina Islands Newport Rhode Island and other vacation worthy locations these dense dynamic patterns brought the world to consumers FIDM Museum owns a black and tan tropical themed swatch approximately 8x17 inches from the Playgrounds of the World series Like all H R Mallinson textiles the company and pattern name are woven in the selvedge Unfortunately our swatch was cut midway through this identifying text Given the tropical feel and overall theme of the series we hazard a guess that our swatch presents a vision of Havana Cuba Playgrounds of the World was just one of many themed textile lines developed by H R Mallinson Company Other series highlighted the beauty of America s national parks American state flowers and Early American themes including Betsy Ross and the life of Abraham Lincoln These printed textiles were for use as fashion fabrics they were available to home sewers and garment manufacturers alike Not content to limit his audience to North America Mallinson successfully promoted his company s textiles for use by French couturiers Founded in 1900 and renamed H R Mallinson Company in 1915 the company s goal was to challenge the supremacy of European textiles Though the United States manufactured silk textiles consumers in the early twentieth century preferred the more prestigious and more expensive imported French silks By focusing on creative appealing designs H R Mallinson Company attracted consumers helped establish the legitimacy of American designed textile patterns and became one of the most well known textile manufacturers of the early twentieth century In 1928 Vogue described the improved quality of American textile patterns our own manufacturers have caught up with their clamorous market and the best of the domestic prints can compete with the blended tonal effects the subtle use of unexpected colours that characterize those that have come over from Paris 1 An image of an H R Mallinson Company fabric of red and yellow cherries printed on a black silk ground was used to illustrate the article 1 Spring Fabrications The Material Side of the American Mode Vogue Feb 1 1928 54 Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments 0 TrackBack 0 May 16 2014 Silk gauze dress c 1855 1860 c 1855 1860 Gift of Jane M Gincig and Patricia Larson Kalayjian S2011 1087 189 With a low curved neckline and short sleeves this silk gauze dress was meant for evening Day dresses of this era featured long sleeves and modest necklines but evening dresses featured alluringly low cut necklines that exposed neck shoulders arms and décolletage The bodice is shaped by vertical bust darts and interior boning As was typical of 1850s evening bodices it fastens at center back with a hook and eye closure The symmetrical fullness of the bell shaped skirt is controlled by cartridge pleats at the waist The skirt is embellished with three flounces each one slightly wider than its predecessor Cascading layers of flounces were a key feature of 1850s skirts and can be used to date dresses to this decade Often featuring a contrasting print fringe or tassels these flounces emphasized the horizontal plane making already full skirts appear even fuller Three rows of mini flounces on each short sleeve echo the skirt s full silhouette Until the development of the cage crinoline in 1856 bell shaped skirts were achieved with layers of petticoats Women reportedly wore as many as six different petticoats at a time Layered petticoats were unwieldy awkward and heavy The lightweight cage crinoline a series of graduated steel hoops held together with thin vertical strips of fabric allowed women to achieve the fashionable silhouette without layers of cumbersome petticoats Relatively inexpensive and easy to manufacture cage crinolines were worn by women at all economic levels They remained popular until about 1868 Skirt detail S2011 1087 189 The green paisley or boteh decorating the flounces was a popular 1850s decorative motif Borrowed from hand woven Kashmiri shawls that became popular in Europe during the late 18th century it was derived from floral forms Woven in Kashmir and imported to Europe and North America by the British East India Company these shawls were popular dress accessories By the middle of the 19th century European weavers began producing printed and woven approximations of these desirable consumer goods Paisley a Scottish weaving town which produced large quantities of the shawls ultimately lent them an English language name Because of their large size value and beauty shawls were sometimes remade into gowns coats or other garments In their unaltered form they were often worn as outerwear either as a simple wrap or a loose cape like garment Perhaps this soft green evening dress was once paired with a paisley shawl for a striking evening ensemble Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments 0 TrackBack 0 April 08 2014 From the Archives Vivienne Westwood suit Happy birthday to Dame Vivienne Westwood Born on April 8 1941 Westwood s career has spanned generations of fashion from 1970s punk to her more recent interest in historicism Today we salute her work by taking a close look at a plaid wool suit she designed in the early 1990s British designer Vivienne Westwood b 1941 began her fashion career in the early 1970s just as the prevailing fashions began a shift towards the aggressive look of punk Embracing a design sense that explored the possibilities of decay and destruction punk was a challenge to the concept of clothing as a means to beautify the individual Though Westwood did not single handedly generate the edgy and confrontational look of punk her early work is closely associated with the visual essentials of punk style including bondage references and intentionally ripped or torn fabrics While these design features may seem almost commonplace today in the late 1970s they were a radical departure from the romantic and non Western influences present in late sixties style This new look was

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/textile/ (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Thea Porter
    print dress Want to see this vibrant Thea Porter dress in person Make a beeline for the MFA Boston where it s currently on display in Hippie Chic an exhibit celebrating the fashions of the Woodstock generation On view through November 11 2013 Hippie Chic features 54 ensembles including seven garments borrowed from the FIDM Museum collection Curator Kevin Jones travelled to Boston to dress and install the FIDM Museum

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/thea-porter/ (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Thierry Mugler
    like Miss Kitty from Gunsmoke the Los Angeles Times quipped 4 By her third spin down the runway she was having a jolly good time revealing the results of much of her plastic surgery wearing a long taupe satin strapless gown with the bottom designed to resemble a cowboy hat 5 Thierry Mugler Paris Spring Summer 1992 Museum Purchase 2001 5 6A C Critics savaged the collection especially American critics who did not appreciate Mugler s kinky bastardization of the frontier myth Burlesque has always been Mugler s stock in trade on the runway the Los Angeles Times admitted But this time the S M undertones and the gaudy excesses were out of sync with America s more conservative attitude 6 Women s Wear Daily found something to admire beneath the sequins and hype however Theatrics aside Mugler did manage to get a firm grip on the season s trends fringe skirts a herd of cowpoke chaps calfskin prints long shirtdresses transparent looks bi level lengths bare midriffs and even some bare bottoms 7 These sculptural gabardine suits studded with silver steer s horns were among the more wearable pieces in the show The collars contrasting yokes and peplum waists recall the construction of the Western shirts beloved by urban cowboys since the 1920s 1 Chicago Tribune October 23 1991 2 Chicago Tribune October 23 1991 3 Women s Wear Daily October 18 1991 4 Los Angeles Times October 21 1991 5 Chicago Tribune October 23 1991 6 Los Angeles Times October 21 1991 7 Women s Wear Daily October 18 1991 Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments 0 June 03 2011 Thierry Mugler jellies Remember jellies Brightly colored glossy plastic jelly shoes usually shortened to jellies were a 1980s fad Made from injection molded plastic jellies were available in

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/thierry-mugler/ (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Tina Leser
    a designer s name was paired with original on the garment label it designated a ready to wear garment produced in extremely limited quantities and available only at select stores Bridging the gap between custom made haute couture and widely available ready to wear the buyer of an original garment was unlikely to encounter another women wearing the same model This labeling technique was used by numerous American designers including Adrian A brief 1955 New York Times article on this exact skirt stated that the tape lace embellishment at the hips was hand made by nuns in a Flanders convent Leser designed a pattern for the lace which then took 10 days for 3 nuns to complete The article comments on the exclusivity of the skirt noting that it had limited availability and would be a suitable gift to be handed down from mother to daughter 2 The retail price was 195 a definite bargain for the amount of handwork involved Detail of 2003 792 5 1 Designer s Pattern Los Angeles Times 8 Oct 1950 C9 2 From a Belgian Convent New York Times 17 Dec 1955 20 Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments 2 TrackBack 0 September 21 2009 Tina Leser Tina Leser 1910 1986 is among the generation of American designers credited with creating and popularizing the American Look during and immediately after World War II Along with designers such as Carolyn Schnurer Louella Ballerino and Claire McCardell Leser designed casual ready to wear clothing inspired by non Western garments and textiles Based in New York Leser s extensive world travels informed her designs and she often spoke on the subject of interpreting non Western artistic traditions into contemporary fashions Though she is less well known today when Leser was actively designing she was noted for her

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/tina-leser/ (2016-02-12)
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