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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Yoshiki Hishinuma
    t find the textile materials he envisioned Rather than working with a manufacturer Hishinuma himself began experimenting with natural and chemical processes to alter the finish and form of synthetic textiles These textiles then become garments in a process that Hishinuma oversees from start to finish To create the shirt seen here a base fabric of sheer polyester was heat laminated with strips of reptile printed vinyl More recently Hishinuma utilized a knitting machine to create seamless garments designed to look like flowers Detail of 2005 5 31 Though Hishinuma produces his textiles primarily for garment construction the garments seem almost secondary a mere canvas to showcase the results of his textile experiments The textiles themselves have such depth and visual interest that they become the primary focus In this sense Hishinuma s contemporary creations share a lineage with the more traditional textiles used in kimonos neither textile depends on an interaction with the body to bring it to life This stand alone independence is a primary attribute of Japanese textile and garment design which often focuses attention away from the body and towards the materials and or silhouette Back view 2005 5 31 Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post Goodness how beautiful But as a textile conservator I can t help but think about how the garment will age over time Heat set vinyl hmmmmmm Posted by Nicole June 09 2010 at 09 17 AM Nicole you make a really important point Given the materials and process involved in creating this shirt it makes a lot of sense to wonder how it will age Will it be like the 1960s plastics vinyls that have turned yellow and sticky Will the heat set vinyl flake off

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2010/06/yoshiki-hishinuma.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Tailored suit
    tailored suit was an important component of the feminine wardrobe No longer associated with masculinity tailored suits were cut close to the body and showcased the feminine form During the 1940s Adrian designed notable suits with an innovative use of fabric patterns to create subtle details The slim silhouette and squared shoulders of this black white and blue wool suit are classic Adrian styling Adrian firmly believed in this strong silhouette declining to modify it even when Christian Dior s slope shouldered full skirted New Look silhouette appeared in 1947 As a designer he refused to be bullied by the New Look and encouraged women to ignore the dictates of those minds 1 Two piece suit Adrian 1946 48 Gift of Anonymous Donor 2003 40 15AB 2003 40 15AB Jacket detail 2003 40 15AB Tailored suits maintained their foothold on fashion throughout the 1950s and 1960s only losing favor when less formal dressing came into fashion during the late 1960s and 1970s Tailored suits if worn at all were likely to be pantsuits In the 1980s tailored suits made a comeback once again becoming a professional uniform for working women Power dressing was so prevalent that tailored suits sometimes appeared as evening wear The jewel toned color scheme of this Yves Saint Laurent evening suit showcases turquoise and pink popular 1980s colors Evening suit Yves Saint Laurent 1988 Museum Purchase 2000 5 2AB Imported from France by the department store Neiman Marcus the excellent quality of this suit is typical of a haute couture garment Encircling the neckline the three dimensional embroidery is composed of sequins bugle beads and lame backed with chiffon and lined with pink silk Something of this intricacy could only be completed by hand 2000 5 2AB Jacket detail 1 Hammond Fay Adrian Premieres Fall and

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2010/02/tailored-suit.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Fundraising Friday: Winter Bride
    be trimmed with fur it is actually swansdown that accents the collar shoulders cuffs and fine linen gauze overskirt a romantic appurtenance for a winter bride Detail The lace cap is adorned with glass beads and pear shaped pearls and anchors a square floor length veil of tulle This is one of more than a dozen historic wedding gowns in the Larson Collection dating from the early 19th century to the 1960s the collection also includes several veils and other bridal accessories and a man s embroidered wedding coat from the 18th century Detail The FIDM Museum has a once in a lifetime opportunity to acquire this rare and beautiful ensemble and many more like it before the collection is dispersed forever or sold into private hands inaccessible to students researchers and the general public But we need your help to save the Larson Collection We have raised more than twenty percent of the necessary funds but we still have a long way to go and time is running out Please make a contribution online or by mail or join our 4for400 social media campaign to donate 4 or more by texting Museum to 243725 Donations are tax deductible if your company or organization has a matching gift program your support will go even further You can also help by spreading the word on social media using the 4for400 hashtag The FIDM Museum as until the end of 2015 to finish raising the necessary funds so please join the campaign and help save 400 years of fashion history Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post Verify your Comment Previewing your Comment Posted by This is only a preview Your comment has not yet been posted Your comment

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2015/10/fundraising-friday-winter-bride.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Something Wicked This Way Comes
    Salem Angelina Jolie as the evil fairy Maleficent Endora from Bewitched or the White Witch from The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe Even the green tinged Wicked Witch of the West appreciates a fabulous pair of shoes Hubert de Givenchy Paris Fall Winter 1970 71 Gift of Mrs Alfred Bloomingdale 77 116 Hubert de Givenchy b 1927 created this gown for Los Angeles socialite Betsy Bloomingdale who is regarded as a kind of fairy godmother to the FIDM Museum thanks to her many donations from her couture wardrobe Though made of black silk gazar edged with black velvet it is anything but basic With its asymmetrical three dimensionality it invites admiration from all angles and casts a disorienting spell on its beholders Detail Detail Howard Greer Beverly Hills 1955 Museum Purchase 86 25 1AB Howard Greer 1896 1974 had a flair for the dramatic thanks to his stint as the head of Paramount s wardrobe department He often provided coordinating capes or jackets with his eveningwear This high low black taffeta and tulle cape hides a fishtail gown with a dramatic neckline which plunges to a V in the back but recalls a witches pointy hat in front All you need to join the ranks of Hollywood s best dressed witches is a broomstick Detail Detail Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post Verify your Comment Previewing your Comment Posted by This is only a preview Your comment has not yet been posted Your comment could not be posted Error type Your comment has been saved Comments are moderated and will not appear until approved by the author Post another comment The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image Please try again As

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2015/10/black-givenchy.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: American Editions of Paris Originals: 1950s couture copying
    the designer of each garment but specifically stating that the garments pictured were American editions of Paris originals by Balenciaga Jacques Fath or another Paris couturier 2 2004 291 13 Collar detail Though the copying of couture garments was institutionalized during the 1950s some designers were against the practice In several late 1950s advertisements for American editions the designer is listed only as Monsieur X Based on the design of the garments pictured Monsieur X is probably Christian Dior Was the use of an anonymous name intended to heighten interest in these copies or was it indicative of one designer s uncomfortable relationship with copying Balenciaga also made some attempts to regulate copying of his garments Though he allowed the purchase of finished garments by retailers for copying in 1956 he banned fashion journalists from the fashion shows attended by individual clients and retail buyers Journalists were invited to a show held one month after this first showing long after other Paris shows had finished Balenciaga made this move because he was frustrated by the appearance of his creations in newspapers and magazines so soon after their introduction to possible buyers Unscrupulous manufacturers and retailers could simply copy the published descriptions and illustrations without purchasing the approved originals By the time of the second fashion show Balenciaga s employees had finished and delivered all garments ordered at the first more private showing By forcing journalists to wait several weeks to see his creations Balenciaga attempted to preserve both the mystique of his aesthetic and the profitability of his creations Unknown designer I Magnin c 1957 Gift of Mrs Roxanne Wilson S2003 1 3 Buyers often substantially modified Paris originals based on a belief that when new French clothes first appear more often than not they strike the average women with her immediate wardrobe needs in mind as extreme and unwearable 3 Alterations could be as minor as changing the color and fabric or geared towards simplifying a design for mass production The blue coat pictured here though not identical is very similar in silhouette and textile to Balenciaga s coat of the same period During the 1950s Paris couture was still the center of the fashion world influencing dress through both licensed and unlicensed copies of garments originating in Paris Though we haven t found any evidence to suggest that this blue coat is an American Edition of a Paris Original its similarity to Balenciaga s design indicates the degree to which Paris fashion directly influenced garments made and worn in the United States S2003 1 3 Collar detail 1 Macy s advertisement New York Times 18 Mar 1956 11 2 An Easy Story from Paris Pleats Flares Drapery New York Times 12 Sept 1956 43 3 Howkins Elizabeth How Paris Couture Affects American Design New York Times 23 Aug 1957 22 Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post I think that intellectual property should be protected

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2010/10/american-editions-of-paris-originals-1950s-couture-copying.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Suede and vinyl boots, 1968-70
    of a boot the all in one stocking shoe Boots Suede vinyl 1968 1970 Museum purchase 2003 5 31AB By the late 1960s boots were available in a variety of manifestations from short to tall leather to synthetic solid color to embellished Fashion had begun to turn away from the futuristic forms of the middle 1960s and started mining the past for inspiration Laced boots though often made of modern synthetic materials were reminiscent of late 19th century women s footwear This pair of green suede and vinyl boots showcases this trend and updates it with an open toe Because of its airy lacing open toe and bright coloration this boot seems designed for spring and summer not cold weather As part of their 1960s transition from functional to fashionable footwear boots were worn throughout the year As described by the title of a September 1968 New York Times article Warm weather or not women are boot minded In the article summer boots are described as being wilder sillier more decorative and more diversified than ever before Synthetic and non traditional materials were popular for fashion and accessories throughout the 1960s Vinyl and plastic sometimes paired with real leather or suede were used to create whimsical footwear An August 15 1968 Vogue editorial called American Made Man Made highlighted the role of synthetics in footwear praising advances which put tomorrow s man made materials right at and on your feet today These creations meant to be worn a few times and then discarded in favor of the newest trend are indicative of the optimistic attitude of the 1960s From the perspective of a museum professional these synthetic materials can be extremely difficult to store and maintain because they deteriorate over time With age plastics tend to become sticky yellowish and

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2011/02/suede-and-vinyl-boots-1968-70.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: "Fabulous Fashion" Lecture Series
    overlapping jewels worn by the Dollar Princess daughters of Robber Barons five of whom are discussed in this lecture Jennie Jerome Consuelo Yznaga Consuelo Vanderbilt Helena Zimmerman and May Goelet Evening dress Havet Agnѐs c 1927 L2011 13 351 Gatsby s Women Fashionable Ideals of the 1920s January 26 6 30 pm 8 00 pm F Scott Fitzgerald s The Great Gatsby published in 1925 reflects a time of dramatic feminine transformation Christina Johnson Associate Curator at the FIDM Museum will provide an overview of Jazz Age fashion Hollywood film icons and 1920s high society Johnson will describe how the fictional characters in Fitzgerald s best selling novel represented the decade s new fashionable ideals Hat worn by Jean Simmons in Young Bess Walter Plunkett 1953 Gift of Stacey Behlmer 2003 798 1 Pulling Down the Curtain Exploring Walter Plunkett s Hollywood Legacy February 2 6 30 pm 8 00 pm Walter Plunkett a man responsible for hundreds of celebrated designs in more than 260 films over a 40 year period is not a household name Plunkett s career as a self taught costume designer included one of the most iconic film costumes of all time Scarlett O Hara s Curtain Dress Yet the question remains why Walter Plunkett has not achieved the same prominence as his peers Join us as Joanna Abijaoude Museum Associate at the FIDM Museum brings Walter Plunkett s legacy out from behind the shadows and illustrates why his work made a lasting and relevant impact in the world of costume design All lectures Textile Arts Council Members 10 Museum Members 15 General 20 Advance reservations required Tickets include entrance to the Exhibition Galleries starting at 6 00 pm and a wine and cheese reception Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2016/01/fabulous-fashion-lecture-series.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Merry Pranksters
    out of fashion over the course of the 20th century they were particularly appropriate to the carnival mood of the 1960s even appearing on underwear umbrellas pajamas ski wear maternity clothes and hosiery A 1962 Picasso retrospective in New York fueled the trend providing plenty of food for thought for Seventh Avenue designers who tend to focus on the saltimbanques or clowns according to Women s Wear Daily 1 Detail Harlequin prints combined the bold black and white geometric patterns of Mod style with the kaleidoscope colors of Flower Power Vogue described a Leo Narducci minidress of 1967 as being diamond patterned like a jester s motley 2 This coat s materials are as anarchic as its design the diamonds are dyed Korean rat fur while the collar and cuffs are raccoon Dress I Magnin c 1965 Gift of Doris Raymond 2005 800 1 Pauline Trigère s Spring 1961 collection featured bisected Puncinello styles combining colors in big doses with harlequin brilliance 3 This particolored minidress resembles one illustrated in Women s Wear Daily in 1967 which was paired with coordinating tights with mismatched legs Like medieval jesters the merry pranksters of the 1960s were characterized by childlike playfulness and a flagrant disregard for authority As London antiques dealer Christopher Gibbs quipped The King s Road is a wilderness of stoned harlequins 4 Detail 1 Women s Wear Daily May 7 1962 2 Vogue January 15 1967 3 Women s Wear Daily October 28 1960 4 http www vam ac uk content articles f 1960s fashion london Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post Verify your Comment Previewing your Comment Posted by This is only a preview Your comment has not yet been posted Your comment could

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2015/10/fun-furs.html (2016-02-12)
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