archive-org.com » ORG » F » FIDMMUSEUM.ORG

Total: 762

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • FIDM Museum Blog: FIDM Museum Study Collection
    flaw which keeps them out of the Permanent Collection For example a rip faded colors or a slight flaw in construction would send an otherwise amazing garment to a home in the Study Collection While we strive to ensure that our Permanent Collection which is used primarily for exhibition will last as long as humanly possible we expect that objects in the Study Collection will have a shorter lifespan due to their use as educational tools When you visit FIDM expect to be greeted by a mannequin dressed in an ensemble pulled directly from our Study Collection She ll be waiting for you when you exit the elevator into our main lobby Make sure you also check the entrance to our Museum Store where we regularly feature a grouping of mannequins dressed in garments from our Study Collection We rotate dressed mannequins frequently so be sure to visit us often Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post Verify your Comment Previewing your Comment Posted by This is only a preview Your comment has not yet been posted Your comment could not be posted Error type Your comment

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2009/07/fidm-museum-study-collection.html (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive


  • FIDM Museum Blog: Bugle-Beaded Borders by Night
    and hem Norman Norell New York 1966 Gift of Clarissa Dyer 2003 794 9 A master of strict elegance Norell s clothes were never flashy or tacky he used yards and yards of crystal beading to give his eveningwear a rich look combining metallic embellishment with matte fabrics in muted colors 2 In 1962 Women s Wear Daily praised his bugle beaded borders by night 3 He continued to experiment with beaded borders in subsequent collections This dress is probably the one Vogue had in mind in March of 1966 when it described a soft small icy blue crepe with sleeves caught at the wrist completely plain except for a ten inch band of silver bugle beads shivering above the knee 4 The magazine had pictured a very similar Norell dress the previous month calling it the evening dress of the season short knee baring geometric easy and snug at the shoulders swinging wide at the hem in the manner of the trapeze 5 The combination of traditional tailoring with a contemporary perspective defined the Norell look As Vogue put it Modern to the bone without a flicker of nostalgia his clothes at the same time bring back the best of an era of great elegance 6 1 Women s Wear Daily Septhember 20 1967 2 Women s Wear Daily June 28 1961 3 Women s Wear Daily July 11 1962 4 Vogue March 1 1966 5 Vogue February 15 1966 6 Vogue February 15 1966 Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post can imagine Mia Farrow at a Sinatra party in this frock Posted by Ree December 11 2015 at 02 47 PM Verify your Comment Previewing your Comment Posted by This is only a preview

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2015/12/norell.html (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • FIDM Museum Blog: Norman Norell
    start to finish by a single worker and often required a great deal of hand work In order to maintain quality control Norell personally supervised the production of his designs and maintained a profit cap of 2 million The level of workmanship and oversight that went into the production of each garment resulted in high prices Norell s design aesthetic however was so timeless that women kept and wore their Traina Norell or Norell garments for many years In his 1972 obituary one client remarked I wore an 11 year old Norell to the symphony the other night and everyone thought it was new 1 Another client commented on the overall wearability of Norell s designs There s something about his clothes that made you feel marvelous 2 Side view of 2003 794 4A C Once Norell landed on a successful design he was not afraid of repeating himself As he said in the 1960s To qualify as a designer one should not be afraid to repeat a good design and certainly must have his own signature 3 One of Norell s signatures was the sailor dress which appeared throughout his career The FIDM Museum version dates from the early 1950s and is a classic representation of the 1950s silhouette Other versions feature a reverse color scheme navy with white accents long sleeves or a slightly modified silhouette When Norell s March 1969 collection did not feature even one sailor dress a reviewer noted He s been making sailor dresses for so long it seems as if he invented them 4 That same season however New York designers Geoffrey Beene and Bill Blass offered versions of the sailor dress demonstrating the influential nature of Norell s persistent vision Back view of 2003 794 4A C 1 Morris Bernadine Norman Norell

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2009/08/norman-norell.html (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • FIDM Museum Blog: Fundraising Friday: Harvey Nichols, Darling
    an impressive legacy for a man who never actually existed The store s original owner Benjamin Harvey hired James Nichols in 1841 Nichols would marry Harvey s niece in 1848 When Harvey died in 1850 his widow went into partnership with Nichols to form Harvey Nichols Co By 1874 the store had expanded so many times that it occupied an entire city block Undoubtedly its growth was partly due to innovative marketing Harvey Nichols sponsored an advertorial column in a London newspaper and placed ads in American Vogue in advance of the Anglo American Exhibition of 1914 With its tassels external pockets decorative buttons and stripes placed at right angles this printed silk day dress makes the most of a simple palette of black and white Hat J W Robinson Co Los Angeles c 1917 Helen Larson Historic Fashion Collection The FIDM Museum has a once in a lifetime opportunity to acquire these rare and beautiful objects and many more like them before the Larson Collection is dispersed forever or sold into private hands But we need your help to save the Larson Collection Time is running out Please make a contribution online or by mail or join our 4for400 social media campaign to donate 4 or more by texting Museum to 243725 Donations are tax deductible if your company or organization has a matching gift program your support will go even further You can also help by spreading the word on social media using the 4for400 hashtag The FIDM Museum as until the end of 2015 to finish raising the necessary funds so please join the campaign and help save 400 years of fashion history Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post Verify your Comment Previewing

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2015/12/harvey.html (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • FIDM Museum Blog: Highland Fever
    brands like Pringle of Scotland Edina Ronay and Scott Henshall This tweed daytime suit consisting of an Argyll jacket matching vest and kilt dates from shortly after the move the new address proudly inscribed on the label Detail The Scotch House soon added a second store in London s Regent Street shopping district eventually expanding throughout southern England France Wales and even Scotland itself But it began closing branches in the 1980s hurt by a drop in tourism In 2001 the firm s owners Great Universal Stores put the ailing label on the market but failed to find a buyer After more than 100 years in business the Brompton Road store closed along with the remaining locations Today Burberry looms over the intersection still known as Scotch Corner Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post My Dad and I shopped at a Scotch House in London several years ago When we asked what sizes a certain sweater came in the sales lady replied They are available in sizes small medium large extra large and HUGE We thought that was hilarious and I still think about that sometimes while wearing my tartan necktie Miss The Scotch House Posted by Greg October 25 2015 at 06 13 AM I had been fascinated with the question of how the kilt become the Scot sman s national dress but I did not think to ask how the taste for things Scottish moved way south of the border Certainly King George IV s famous visit to Edinburgh in 1822 was important but you mention that it took until 1839 for the Gardiner brothers to leave Glasgow to open The Scotch House in London It would be interesting to know what sparked Londoners

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2015/10/kilt.html (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • FIDM Museum Blog: December 2015
    quality of the drawing and presentation as well as her integration of the exhibition artwork and the written explanation of her design process Olivia described her inspiration This piece of art inspired me due to the era in which it was painted As a lover of the 90s and being born during this era it was really relatable to me I really like how simple it is but it says so much The choice of colors symbols and shapes portray something so beautiful and lively I chose to do a fashion sketch and design some pieces of clothing using the painting as a pattern I designed a lightweight trench coat and a two piece knit top and skirt The overall purpose of the design was to showcase the painting which was used as a printed pattern But at the same time I wanted to stay true to what is in style today I think that the overall look is fun and really showcases the era of the 1990s Congratulations Olivia Visit Inspired Eye The Donald and Joan Damask Design Collection at the FIDM Museum 10am 5pm Tuesday through Saturday until December 19 at our Los Angeles campus 919 S Grand Avenue Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments 0 December 01 2015 It s Giving Tuesday After Black Friday and Cyber Monday comes Giving Tuesday the international day of giving to charities and non profits The FIDM Museum urgently needs your generous support We have less than a month to raise the funds to purchase the Helen Larson Historic Fashion Collection a one of a kind private collection of 1 400 rare objects representing 400 years of fashion history including a rare 17th century man s doublet garments and accessories worn by European royalty and pieces by 22 haute couture designers

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2015/12/page/2/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • FIDM Museum Blog: Happy Thanksgiving!
    feathers frames the V neckline of this black silk Oscar de la Renta gown one of two turkey trimmed ensembles by the designer in the FIDM Museum collection Wishing all of our readers a very happy Thanksgiving Fundraising Friday will return next week Oscar de la Renta 1980s Gift of Clarissa Dyer 2003 794 12 Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post Verify your Comment Previewing your Comment Posted by This is only a preview Your comment has not yet been posted Your comment could not be posted Error type Your comment has been saved Comments are moderated and will not appear until approved by the author Post another comment The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image Please try again As a final step before posting your comment enter the letters and numbers you see in the image below This prevents automated programs from posting comments Having trouble reading this image View an alternate Post a comment Comments are moderated and will not appear until the author has approved them Comment below or sign in with Typepad Facebook Twitter Google and more You

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2015/11/turkey.html (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • FIDM Museum Blog: West Coast Mod
    of Stephanie Kline Morehouse 2003 148 1 This shift dress of multicolored wool exemplifies the company s brand of cheap chic A similar dress was illustrated in Women s Wear Daily in April 1967 described as a shift in paintbox colors framed in black an abstract art arrangement in wool designed for Phil Rose by Irene Saltern 1911 2005 2 Born in Germany Saltern attended fashion school in Berlin where she lived next door to Albert Einstein In the late 1930s Saltern moved to Hollywood to pursue a career in costume design working on more than 35 films for Republic Pictures and United Artists before turning her talents to fashion design In 1950 she became head designer for Tabak one of the early Los Angeles sportswear companies Detail As early as 1944 the Los Angeles Times noted Stressing the importance of line and silhouette rather than intricate detail Miss Saltern uses a technique which she calls optical illusion a play of bright colors against dark shades that trim the figure down to slim graceful proportions the same technique used in this dress 3 1 Vogue April 15 1954 2 Women s Wear Daily April 19 1967 3 Los Angeles Times October 11 1944 b Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post Irene Saltern s archive is at UC Irvine On my blog americanagefashion com I wrote about the contents See them here http americanagefashion com p 3385 Posted by Lynn Mally November 24 2015 at 08 57 AM Verify your Comment Previewing your Comment Posted by This is only a preview Your comment has not yet been posted Your comment could not be posted Error type Your comment has been saved Comments are moderated and will not

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2015/11/23-24-234.html (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive



  •