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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Fundraising Friday: Vintage Fashion
    has the straight silhouette and abbreviated hemline characteristic of the 1920s the decade when Prohibition prohibited the sale of wine and other alcoholic drinks in the United States Because it was legal to make wine at home for personal consumption however many Americans became amateur vintners and enthusiastic oeneophiles during Prohibition which lasted until 1933 This coat may be a witty reference to the fruit of the vine s newfound popularity a different kind of vintage fashion The FIDM Museum has a once in a lifetime opportunity to acquire this rare and beautiful garment and many more like it before the Larson Collection is dispersed forever or sold into private hands But we need your help to save the Larson Collection We have raised more than twenty percent of the necessary funds but we still have a long way to go and time is running out Please make a contribution online or by mail or join our 4for400 social media campaign to donate 4 or more by texting Museum to 243725 Donations are tax deductible if your company or organization has a matching gift program your support will go even further You can also help by spreading the word on social media using the 4for400 hashtag The FIDM Museum as until the end of 2015 to finish raising the necessary funds so please join the campaign and help save 400 years of fashion history Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post Verify your Comment Previewing your Comment Posted by This is only a preview Your comment has not yet been posted Your comment could not be posted Error type Your comment has been saved Comments are moderated and will not appear until approved by the author Post

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2015/11/fundraising-friday-vintage-fashion.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Black Beauty
    diamonds and reflective trimmings during mourning an important social ritual in the Victorian period The use of jet on mourning garments seems to date to just before the death of Prince Albert Queen Victoria s husband the heartbroken queen popularized elaborate and prolonged mourning Jet was used sparingly until the 1880s when dresses were literally encrusted with jet beads whether matte for mourning or faceted for fashion The FIDM Museum has several jet trimmed garments including a reception gown by Charles Frederick Worth a mantle by Emile Pingat and the jacket above which was probably a mourning garment It is made of handmade floral embroidered black net embellished with velvet ribbons and jet beads Sautoir c 1885 Museum Purchase 2008 5 13 Jet jewelry enlivened drab black mourning garments in the later stages of mourning it could be faceted for added visual interest This necklace composed of a long rope of faceted jet beads with fringed triangular pendants at each end was worn draped over the wearer s neck with the ends hanging down the front of her gown below her knees Detail With its vivid red hue the velvet toque below could not be mistaken from mourning dress But by the 1880s jet was at the height of its popularity as a high fashion ornament Four rows of large faceted jet beads edge the front of the hat a few beads have fallen off over the years Toque American c 1885 Museum Purchase 2009 5 10 A black mesh overlay is embroidered with fringed roundels of small faceted jet beads and straw work knots But the fashion for jet inevitably passed and the decline of mourning rituals after World War I spelled the death of the Whitby jet industry Detail 1 Thomas N Bradley Bradley s new guide to

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2015/11/jet.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Fundraising Friday: The Widow of Windsor
    adopting colors and trimmings This gown of silk faille and crepe created decades after Albert s death is only somewhat enlivened by black beads and machine made lace A small peplum dates the ensemble to the late 1890s but it is otherwise typical of the Queen s habitual dress in the second half of her life Detail Perversely the Queen s refusal to follow fashion set a trend for elaborate mourning bereaved women throughout Europe and the United States emulated her prolonged and ostentatious display of grief The Helen Larson Historic Fashion Collection includes several garments owned by Queen Victoria including both mourning wear and monogrammed underwear hats gloves and other accessories plus many more worn by her children and grandchildren These sartorial relics of the royal family were given as hand me downs or mementos to friends relatives and servants and treasured by their descendants Helen Larson s cache of British royal dress purchased on multiple trips to the United Kingdom in the mid 20th century would be impossible to replicate today even if they could be found modern day export laws would prevent these historically significant objects from leaving the country The FIDM Museum s fundraising campaign presents a once in a lifetime opportunity to acquire garments literally fit for a queen Detail Helen Larson spent 50 years building her extraordinary collection now it is in danger of being dispersed forever or absorbed into another private collection inaccessible to students researchers and the general public The FIDM Museum needs your help to save the Larson collection You can make a contribution of any amount online or by mail Donations are tax deductible if your company has a matching gift program your support will go even further The FIDM Museum has until the end of 2015 to finish raising

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2015/05/fundraising-friday-the-widow-of-windsor.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Charles Worth
    further reinforcing Worth s artistic stature Worth created a sense of opulence by using large quantities of luxurious fabric Though his earlier gowns tend to feature relatively plain silk fabrics his later designs make excellent use of French produced luxury fabrics such as cut velvet When using patterned fabric Worth tended to favor large scale motifs such as feathers grains tulips and butterflies Gowns were also distinguished by a generous amount of applied trim such as embroidery fringe and applique Jet beading and lace were other favorite trims as seen in the FIDM Museum Worth reception gown below In 1880 a Washington Post reporter visited the House of Worth At this point Worth s reputation was well established and the overall atmosphere of the establishment demonstrated this Workers spoke in a whisper and even clients were nearly silent The reporter met the man himself and was able to observe him while he selected trim for a ball gown intended for Miss Vanderbilt As the reporter and her friends observed Worth called for the pattern book and turned over many samples before he found the exact trimming which he wanted He tried the effect of this by placing it on the dress and then resumed his work by pinning or unpinning like a sculptor who was engaged in putting the finishing touches to his statue 1 We hope you enjoy getting to know our Worth statue through the images below Reception gown Charles Worth c 1878 Purchase 2006 25 2AB Side view of 2006 25 2AB Back view of 2006 25 2AB Lower bodice and skirt of 2006 25 2AB Hem detail of 2006 25 2AB 1 The Man Milliner Washington Post 24 Oct 1880 2 Coleman Elizabeth Ann The Opulent Era Fashions of Worth Doucet and Pingat New York Thames

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2009/09/charles-worth.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Emile Pingat
    colored silks but Pingat s outerwear always featured extensive embellishment such as beading fringe and lace In fact descriptions of Pingat s outerwear by the fashion press give the impression that the chosen textile was used primarily as a foundation on which to showcase a sophisticated sense of surface design When you look at the images of the FIDM Museum Pingat mantle below notice that the back is cut much shorter than the elongated front This was a design feature intended to accommodate the bustle a type of structured undergarment worn under a dress which created a pouf of fabric at the backside The most exaggerated form of the bustle occurred about 1885 Combining this piece of information with the shape of the actual mantle helped us arrive at an accurate date Wish we could tell you more about Pingat but he is even more of a mystery than the Bou é Soeurs Let us know if you have any additional information to add Mantle Emile Pingat 1884 1887 Purchase 2007 905 1 Side view of 2007 905 1 Back view of 2007 901 1 Coleman Elizabeth Ann The Opulent Era Fashions of Worth Doucet and Pingat New York Thames and Hudson 1989 Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post Hi as co owner of the website www headtotoefashionart com we are looking for a portrait of Emile Pingat Either a photo or painting Does one exist Posted by Trevor Doyne Ditmas June 18 2013 at 03 40 AM Interesting question I don t think I ve ever seen one but there must be one out there Have you looked at Opulent Era Fashions of Worth Doucet and Pingat by Elizabeth Ann Coleman This book is the

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2009/09/emile-pingat.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Out & About: "Hooped" with the Fashion Council
    s hoop petticoat of c 1863 68 The speakers shattered myths about southern belles and their style secrets In his talk on mourning dress in the Civil War era Kevin noted that while one gown in the Hooped show has an 18 inch waist 24 inches is the average of surviving garments from the era and they all required corsets Joanna demonstrated how Walter Plunkett who designed the costumes for Gone With the Wind among other historical films took inspiration from 1860s fashion plates while adapting Civil War styles to 1930s tastes and figures And Cara who conserved the movie s costumes now housed in Austin s Harry Ransom Center revealed that Vivien Leigh s dresses actually had 24 1 2 inch waistlines even though her character Scarlett O Hara claims to have a 17 1 2 inch waist A gingham silk taffeta gown from c 1865 with an 18 inch waistline Southern inspired salads Petite desserts for Scarlett O Hara sized waistlines Non alcoholic mint juleps The sold out event was the final gathering of 2015 for the Fashion Council but an exiting new year of programming will begin in February with the annual Royal Tea Membership in the Council the FIDM Museum s primary support group is free The group gathers for four events annually plus exhibition openings and study tours A New York trip is planned for 2016 Why not join this charitably chic club Flowers worthy of a belle s boudoir Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post Verify your Comment Previewing your Comment Posted by This is only a preview Your comment has not yet been posted Your comment could not be posted Error type Your comment has been saved Comments are

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2015/11/out-about-hooped-with-the-fashion-council.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Fundraising Friday: The Romance of Accessories
    intellectual activity across Europe as well as a corresponding explosion of creativity in fashion A well dressed woman needed a myriad of accessories not including those largely hidden by her outer garments shoes stockings and several undergarments Here a dress of cotton batiste roller printed with brown flowers and vines is accessorized with a lace collar belt purse and gloves A cashmere shawl provided warmth without crushing the voluminous sleeves fashionable in the 1830s a lace cap framed the face beneath a bonnet stiffened with whalebone to protect the wearer s face from the sun All of these objects except the silver belt buckle a permanent collection piece and the ribbon belt and leather gloves which are props come from the Larson Collection While giving a splendid overview of the big picture of fashion history the collection is equally valuable because it so beautifully fills in the small delicate details for museum visitors students and researchers The FIDM Museum has a once in a lifetime opportunity to acquire these rare and beautiful pieces and many more like them before the Larson Collection is dispersed forever or sold into private hands But we need your help to save the Larson Collection We have raised more than twenty percent of the necessary funds but we still have a long way to go and time is running out Please make a contribution online or by mail or join our 4for400 social media campaign to donate 4 or more by texting Museum to 243725 Donations are tax deductible if your company or organization has a matching gift program your support will go even further You can also help by spreading the word on social media using the 4for400 hashtag The FIDM Museum as until the end of 2015 to finish raising the necessary funds

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2015/11/fundraising-friday-the-romance-of-accessories.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: The Quilt That Came Down to Dinner
    White House fashion designers like Donald Brooks Pierre Cardin and Yves Saint Laurent brought the humble quilt out of the bedroom and down to dinner Arnold Scaasi c 1965 69 Gift of Jane Tucker Study Collection 2009 967 American designer Arnold Scaasi 1930 2015 was one of the most prolific quilters of the era A quilted gold stretch brocade evening suit that appeared in Vogue in 1966 had glamour with give 2 A gown of white and gold brocade had a matching jacket weighted with wadding and quilting to make the most triumphant entrance of the season 3 And a simple white cotton minidress took on a sculptural quality when stiffened by all over quilting 4 Detail This gown s metallic silk brocade in a large scale bird and floral motif is further embellished with quilting that highlights the leafy pattern Two rows of wadding at the hem buoy the A line skirt without the need for underpinnings and together with the Orientalist pattern give the gown a kimono like quality The technique must have appealed to Scaasi s love of embroidery and surface embellishment while also pleasing clients in search of the streamlined minimalist silhouette of the 1960s Scaasi would continue to incorporate quilting into his designs for the rest of his career whether evoking folksy handcrafting in the 1970s or adding dramatic volume in the 1980s 1 The Washington Post January 8 1965 2 Vogue November 1 1963 3 Vogue November 15 1963 4 Vogue April 1 1966 Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post Verify your Comment Previewing your Comment Posted by This is only a preview Your comment has not yet been posted Your comment could not be posted Error type Your comment

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2015/11/scaasi.html (2016-02-12)
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