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  • FIDM Museum Blog: October 2015
    butterflies they alighted on hats formed rainbow hued prints and enlivened embroidery In this ensemble from the following year a butterfly morphs into one of the designer s trademark sculptural jacket fasteners Detail Schiaparelli drew on a wide circle of artistic friends for inspiration and assistance This carved and painted black butterfly was likely created by one of her well known sculptor collaborators such as Jean Clément Roger Jean Pierre or François Hugo The ornament s lighter than air appearance belies the heaviness of ensemble which is entirely hand embroidered with thousands of ink blue glass bugle beads together the dress and jacket weigh more than eight pounds Evening Gown Marc Bohan for Christian Dior Paris Fall Winter 1982 83 Gift of Mrs Alfred Bloomingdale 2006 116 6AB Butterflies became part of the iconography of the disco scene thanks to Bionic Boogie s dance hit Hot Butterfly later remixed as Papillon by Chaka Khan A butterfly of black polka dot net bordered by wire and black beads perches on the belt of this evening gown by Marc Bohan b 1926 for Christian Dior Croquis Marc Bohan for Christian Dior Paris Fall Winter 1982 83 Gift of Mrs Alfred Bloomingdale Special Collections SC2006 116 88 The tasseled braided cord wraps around a wide low waistband of black velvet for an obi effect perhaps a nod to the Japanese themed opera Madama Butterfly With its exotic dolman or batwing sleeves also decorated by tassels in the original sketch above the gown is ready to take flight into the night Mules Alexander McQueen c 2004 Museum Purchase 2005 5 112AB For Alexander McQueen 1969 2010 butterflies were not emblems of sweetness and light but reminders of the taxidermist and the entomologist s specimen case His fascination with the natural world encompassed its danger death and decay While these mules may appear playful at first glance the metal tipped spike heel threatens to sting like a bee This butterfly may be the legendary blue morpho an iridescent blue green butterfly native to Central and South America Like many creatures it is losing its native habitat to deforestation a reference consistent with McQueen s dark aesthetic Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments 0 October 02 2015 Fundraising Friday Instagram Takeover Are you missing Mad Men We ve got great news for you Mad Men costume designer Janie Bryant will be taking over the FIDM Museum s Instagram account on Saturday October 24 In support of our 4for400 fundraising campaign Janie will explore the Helen Larson Historic Fashion Collection and show how historic fashion inspires and informs her designs Make sure to follow the Museum s account Instagram com fidmmuseum and stay tuned to Janie Bryant s social media platforms for more details about our upcoming collaboration Instagram com janiebryant In addition to her famous designs for Mad Men Janie Bryant received an Emmy Award for her work on HBO s Deadwood She studied fashion design and worked in Paris and New York before moving to

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2015/10/page/2/ (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: George Halley: From Cows to Couture
    could construct a garment from start to finish he always made one or two dresses in each collection himself just for luck 1 George Halley New York c 1971 Gift of Clarissa Dyer 2003 794 In 1958 Halley married Claudia Morgan a former model for Norman Norell who became his muse I never design anything Claudia wouldn t wear he once said When Claudia demanded evening clothes that make me feel like I can get up and have fun Halley recognized an untapped market for sexy dance dresses A few weeks later for a dinner dance at the St Regis Hotel George insisted Claudia wear his new feather printed chiffon capelet gown rimmed in ostrich possibly the same model as this gown in the FIDM Museum collection We danced all night Halley remembered When Claudia is happy with a fashion it sells She s a fantastic barometer 2 This sleeveless high waisted gown with attached stole unites many of Halley s signatures a bold print feather trim and high quality fabric and workmanship Like most of his evening wear it is a romantic feminine expensive looking garment that barely touches the body Combining seventies chic with Old Hollywood glamour it captures the seductively original viewpoint of the man Women s Wear Daily called a designer in a lovely world of his own 3 1 Women s Wear Daily June 30 1967 2 Beaver County Times December 4 1971 3 Women s Wear Daily June 11 1970 Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post Verify your Comment Previewing your Comment Posted by This is only a preview Your comment has not yet been posted Your comment could not be posted Error type Your comment has been saved Comments

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2015/09/george-halley.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Fundraising Friday: Bags of Style
    1800s The so called miser s purse below could easily fit in a woman s or a man s pocket but it was decorative enough to be carried as well As curator Laura Camerlengo reveals in her book The Miser s Purse the name postdates the fashion and seems to have been inspired by the purse s design Its slit opening made it very difficult to retrieve coins once they had been inserted Two rings slid across a central opening trapping coins in the ends of the bag until they were needed These ubiquitous acessories were usually crocheted and the crafting giving receiving sale and use of miser s purses reflected specific social mores and conveyed certain meanings Camerlengo writes Miser s Purse c 1850 59 Helen Larson Historic Fashion Collection Helen Larson spent 50 years assembling her collection which includes several historically significant bags now it is in danger of being dispersed forever or absorbed into another private collection inaccessible to students researchers and the general public The FIDM Museum urgently needs your help to save the Larson collection Please did deep into your own purse and make a contribution online or by mail or join our 4for400 social media campaign to donate 4 or more by texting Museum to 243725 Donations are tax deductible if your company or organization has a matching gift program your support will go even further You can also help by spreading the word on social media using the 4for400 hashtag The FIDM Museum as until the end of 2015 to finish raising the necessary funds so please join the campaign and help save 400 years of fashion history Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post Verify your Comment Previewing your

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2015/09/fundraising-friday-purses.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Fundraising Friday: The 'It' Bag of 1825
    of the Ladies Society for the Relief of Negro Slaves later renamed the Female Society for Birmingham an antislavery organization founded in 1825 The bags stuffed with abolitionist literature were distributed to prominent citizens including King George IV Princess Victoria the future Queen Victoria and the wives of aristocrats and politicians Detail of Purse Abolitionist accessories purses pincushions jewelry became a major fashion trend of the era related examples can be found in the Victoria Albert Museum the Daughters of the American Revolution Museum and the Library of the Religious Society of Friends Quakers were at the forefront of the antislavery movement in both the United Kingdom and the United States The same image and text can be found on a transfer printed sugar bowl in the DAR Museum and a matching ceramic plate at Wilberforce House in Hull the home of English abolitionist leader William Wilberforce The Emancipation Act of 1833 abolished slavery in the British territories But in the U S the fight was just beginning In 1837 female abolitionists in Boston New York and Philadelphia commissioned 100 pieces of silk stamped from the plate representing a slave mother and her infant sitting under a tree to make purses of their own 1 This extraordinary survival testifies to the ambition and ingenuity of these female crusaders Abolitionist Tract Ladies Society for the Relief of Negro Slaves 1825 Helen Larson Historic Fashion Collection Helen Larson spent 50 years building her collection of historic fashion now it is in danger of being dispersed forever or absorbed into another private collection inaccessible to students researchers and the general public The FIDM Museum needs your help to save the Larson collection You can make a contribution of any amount online or by mail Donations are tax deductible if your company has a

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2015/05/the-it-bag-of-18.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Goat Couture
    as a trimming for gowns capes and parasols Cape The Salt s Company Bridgeport Connecticut c 1900 Gift of Ellie Johnson 2007 921 This cape of black silk velvet in the FIDM Museum Study Collection is trimmed with a border of goat hair whose waves are echoed in the embroidered motifs In December 1895 Vogue advised that black fox or Thibet goat is a capital trimming for a cloak Although often mistaken for the hair of the Tibetan or cashmere goat the curly hair most prized by couturiers actually belonged to the Angora goat Cape c 1900 Gift of Judy Thomsen 2004 823 This short cape of cream colored rabbit fur from the FIDM Museum s Permanent Collection is fully trimmed with a long fringe of matching goat hair On November 26 1892 the magazine The Illustrated American noted a fashion for white evening mantles with white Thibet goat trimming The following year The Bazaar Exchange and Mart and Journal of the Household published a pattern for an opera cloak recommending As regards trimming the prettiest would be white Siberian goat if the colour of the cloak be light Detail While natural white and black were the most popular colors white goat hair could be dyed to achieve a variety of brilliant hues The silky substance could then be arranged into fringe flounces and tassels taking the humble goat from farm to fashion Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post Verify your Comment Previewing your Comment Posted by This is only a preview Your comment has not yet been posted Your comment could not be posted Error type Your comment has been saved Comments are moderated and will not appear until approved by the author Post another

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2015/09/goat-couture.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: From Farm to Fashion
    made of straw and horsehair were intended for use at home They were probably made in the Tuscany region of Italy whose port city of Livorno traditionally called Leghorn in English had long been the preferred source of straw for fashionable ladies hats A horsehair mesh supports a variety of intricate straw plaits braids and ornaments that were likely surplus trimmings from the bonnet industry Crimson silk linings highlight these miniscule twists spirals loops and weaves The fragile shoes required a light graceful step The feminine ideal of the 1830s and 40s owed a great deal to the popularity of ballerinas who embodied demure poise and refinement onstage Their costumes were a major influence on fashion particular their delicate flat soled slippers still worn by dancers today and sold as fashionable streetwear under the name ballet flats Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post wow great blog post really helpful ive been researching how to start a blog for about a month now want to have it all sorted and a few posts pre done before i launch it and this post really helps love your blog you got a new reader Posted by Steve June 11 2015 at 01 32 PM those slippers are beautiful i love your blog its so fresh and clean bookmarked Posted by caroline June 19 2015 at 09 52 AM Verify your Comment Previewing your Comment Posted by This is only a preview Your comment has not yet been posted Your comment could not be posted Error type Your comment has been saved Comments are moderated and will not appear until approved by the author Post another comment The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image Please try

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2015/05/from-farm-to-fashion.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Sweater Weather
    undoubtedly influenced by Faye Dunaway s braless 1930s style sweaters in the 1967 film Bonnie and Clyde Rykiel opened her eponymous Left Bank boutique in 1968 The white hem on the square panel falling from the collar of this sweater calls attention to its unique construction as well as adding depth and visual interest to the black garment Sonia Rykiel Paris c l987 93 Gift of Patricia G Waldron 2002 149 This version is embellished with 36 metal beads in the form of seashells perhaps a wistful reminder of summertime Though made a decade after the first sweater it could easily be from the same time period or from our own The Sonia Rykiel label is still going strong under the guidance of Artistic Director Julie de Libran and recently announced a revamped children s line for Spring Summer 2016 Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post Verify your Comment Previewing your Comment Posted by This is only a preview Your comment has not yet been posted Your comment could not be posted Error type Your comment has been saved Comments are moderated and will not appear

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2015/09/sweater-weather.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Sonia Rykiel
    have been worn by a daring woman of the 1930s or 1940s such as Katharine Hepburn Wool knit ensemble Sonia Rykiel 1980 82 Gift of Patricia G Waldron M D 2002 149 15AB Rykiel s interest in unconstricting knit fabrics is based on the fundamental belief that is possible to be both comfortable and stylish This has led to comparisons with Chanel who exemplified the same maxim throughout her career Many of Rykiel s garments such as the pants and sweater ensemble above are designed to mix and match with other garments creating a system of basic garments that could be worn in a variety of combinations The brightly colored sweater above could also be worn with a knit skirt in the same teal color and either combination could be topped by the loose coat sweater seen below 2002 149 15 with coat sweater Rykiel has indicated that she believes only women are capable of creating garments based on the often opposing dictates of comfort and style In a 1979 interview she said that men won t be wearing the clothes therefore practical considerations are secondary women designers define things with a more practical eye because of the limitations of their body A collar that looks elegant on the drawing board might be difficult to pull over the head And pants that appear elegant can be constricting 1 This is a provocative statement suggesting that male designers ignore comfort for the sake of appearance Do male and female designers create fundamentally different garments Are there examples of male designers who give style and comfort equal weight or examples of female designers who do the opposite 1 Madsen Axel Living for Design The Yves Saint Laurent Story New York Delacorte Press 1979 134 5 Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2009/12/sonia-rykiel.html%20 (2016-02-12)
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