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  • FIDM Museum Blog: A-muse-ing Fashions
    Monet and Edouard Manet are only a few of many artists who also produced artwork portraying dress as their main focal point Clearly fashion has a long history of inspiring art Blouse Spring Summer 1947 Gilbert Adrian Designer Salvador Dalí Textile Artist Enka rayon Museum Purchase 2008 25 10 Then the tables began to turn In the twentieth century fashion houses began to find inspiration for their designs from individual artists and art movements Salvador Dalí of the Surrealist movement worked with multiple design houses and produced textiles such as the shattered rock motif used by Adrian This pattern dates from Dali s 1947 collaboration with Simpson for whom he produced seven designs Though the design of the garment is true to its era of the 1940s with its broad shoulders the use of Dali s imagery offers a deeper understanding of the times Surrealism began in the 1920s as an art movement that gave psychological and philosophical insight by portraying images in a non sequitur fashion Though the movement reached its golden era in the late 1930s we can clearly see the lasting influence of Surrealism in this juxtaposition between one of America s top designers and the great Surrealist leader Evening Dress Fall 1974 Halston Designer Andy Warhol Textile Artist Printed silk jersey Gift of Steven Porterfield 2010 897 3 Our Halston piece is next in line to embody the relationship of art and fashion This dress showcases both artists with full clarity Halston s minimalist approach is evident in his use of jersey and beautiful draping that accentuates the female form Halston didn t use prints very often during his career but when applied they made an impact that did not over shadow his design talent In his Fall 1974 collection Halston featured abstract prints by Jackson

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2011/09/a-muse-ing-fashions.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Just Add Water, Part I
    early twentieth century when men and women commingled in all manner of sports Gazing at firm muscular physiques in clinging wet knit swimsuits like this one must have delighted many female beachgoers United States 1925 35 Museum Purchase Funds provided by Tonian Hohberg 2008 5 46 Generally wool swimwear was unembellished perhaps a nautical stripe or two was added for contrast This machine embroidered version is a rarity Equally unique is its theme Native Americans in mountainous terrain The figures rendered in alternating color bands are identified by their eagle feather headdresses and are surrounded by teepees and campfires Unfortunately the maker of this brilliant red suit is unknown as is the rational for embellishing such modern sportswear with romanticized American frontier scenes Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post Verify your Comment Previewing your Comment Posted by This is only a preview Your comment has not yet been posted Your comment could not be posted Error type Your comment has been saved Comments are moderated and will not appear until approved by the author Post another comment The letters and numbers you entered did not match

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2015/06/mans-suit.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: London Calling
    FIDM Museum curators and social media team heading to London for our 2015 Fashion Council Voyage the blog will be featuring new posts drawn from our FABULOUS catalogue for next two weeks Look for all new Fundraising Friday posts each week as well as updates from London on our Facebook and Twitter feeds Cheerio Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post Verify your Comment Previewing your Comment Posted by This is only a preview Your comment has not yet been posted Your comment could not be posted Error type Your comment has been saved Comments are moderated and will not appear until approved by the author Post another comment The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image Please try again As a final step before posting your comment enter the letters and numbers you see in the image below This prevents automated programs from posting comments Having trouble reading this image View an alternate Post a comment Comments are moderated and will not appear until the author has approved them Comment below or sign in with Typepad Facebook Twitter Google and more You are

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2015/06/london-calling.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Travel to London with the FIDM Museum Fashion Council!
    of Fashion and Textiles at the V A In between trips to royal palaces we will enjoy the splendor of high tea at Claridge s shop the latest fashions on New Bond Street dine at the famous Savoy Grill and catch a performance at the Royal Opera House Finally we will bid farewell to our adventurous week with a champagne toast on the London Eye As always the trip includes a 500 tax deductible donation to the Helen Larson Historic Fashion Collection funds raised from London Voyage 2015 will go toward adopting an object from the collection You absolutely won t want to miss this once in a lifetime opportunity to experience the history and grandeur of London like you ve never seen it before DETAILS Dates June 28 July 6 Cost Sharing double room per person 5 500 Single occupancy 6 500 Total Payment Due May 1 2015 Cost Includes Seven nights at a 4 star hotel daily breakfast Oyster card for tube private tours and museum entry fees excursion fees and transportation Fashion Council dinner Royal Opera House performance high tea symposium registration symposium gala dinner London Eye tax deductible donation to the Helen Larson Historic Fashion Collection roundtrip airport transfers only for attendees who select the same flight as tour leaders Airfare is additional to be arranged by participant we will provide a suggested flight Participation is capped at 12 people please reserve your spot as soon as possible For questions a detailed itinerary or to confirm your participation please contact Museum Associate Joanna Abijaoude jabijaoude FIDMmuseum org 213 623 5821 x2226 Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post that image is absolutely stunning beautiful well done Posted by caroline June 19 2015 at

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2015/01/travel-to-london-with-the-fidm-museum-fashion-council.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: In Memoriam: Elizabeth Galindo
    Comment Posted by This is only a preview Your comment has not yet been posted Your comment could not be posted Error type Your comment has been saved Comments are moderated and will not appear until approved by the author Post another comment The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image Please try again As a final step before posting your comment enter the letters and numbers

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2015/06/in-memoriam-elizabeth-galindo.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Fundraising Friday: Renaissance Man
    and most valuable pieces in the Larson collection a man s jerkin from Renaissance Italy A jerkin was an outer garment worn over the doublet it was usually sleeveless with short tabs or skirts at the waistline It s a style that that would have been familiar to Shakespeare in fact jerkins are mentioned in several of his plays often made of hard wearing leather This version is a much more prestigious and ornamental textile Italian silk velvet Italy was the silk capital of Europe at the time and velvet was the most expensive complex weave King Henry VIII is known to have owned a velvet jerkin in the same color Trimmings of metallic braid enhance the luster of the vibrant textile Lavishly decorated menswear is well represented in the Larson collection many more examples can be seen in Opulent Art 18th Century Dress from The Helen Larson Historic Fashion Collection on view at the FIDM Museum through July 2 Helen Larson spent 50 years building her collection of historic fashion now it is in danger of being dispersed forever or absorbed into another private collection inaccessible to students researchers and the general public The FIDM Museum needs your help to save the Larson collection You can make a contribution of any amount online or by mail Donations are tax deductible if your company has a matching gift program your support will go even further The FIDM Museum has until the end of 2015 to finish raising the necessary funds so now is the time to join the campaign and help make fashion history Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post Verify your Comment Previewing your Comment Posted by This is only a preview Your comment has

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2015/06/fundraising-friday-.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Color to the Max
    map both at home and abroad Stephen Burrows c 1974 Gift of Jo Holzman 2006 871 9 This maxi dress like another dress by Burrows in the FIDM Museum collection demonstrates the designer s absolute disregard for the laws of color as fashion journalist Bernardine Morris put it 1 Each hue represents a different piece of fabric which Burrows painstakingly stitched together for a rainbow effect Bright polychrome garments of wool jersey and double knit were hallmarks of his body conscious styles inspired by New York s disco scene 2006 871 9 Here Burrows upturns notions of proportion as well as color attaching a modified T shirt to a maxi skirt The same dress in a different colorway appeared in Harper s Bazaar in 1974 the price was 32 1 New York Times 12 August 1970 Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post Verify your Comment Previewing your Comment Posted by This is only a preview Your comment has not yet been posted Your comment could not be posted Error type Your comment has been saved Comments are moderated and will not appear until approved by the

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2015/06/stephen-burrows-1.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Stephen Burrows
    she s going to put my things on and say I can t wear this Everything s showing My customer wants to show it 3 2006 871 12 Bodice detail The disco soundtrack to Burrows first fashion show revealed his key influences music and movement Burrows was an active participant in the early 1970s disco oriented New York club scene Dance was simultaneously a favorite pastime and a major influence on his designs Burrows believed that dancing is always in my clothes you can do anything and feel free in the garment 4 This sense of freedom hints at the hedonistic culture of disco which would soon move from the underground clubs of New York to cities across the country The central elements of Burrows aesthetic including bright colors sinuous fit and an inherent sense of physical confidence and ease would become important elements of disco fashion in the mid to late 1970s In fact Burrows aesthetic was so closely aligned with disco that the two declined simultaneously with both falling out of fashion by about 1980 2006 871 12 Back view 1 Morris Bernadine The Look of Fashions for the Seventies in Colors That Dazzle New York Times 12 Aug 1970 p 44 2 Ibid 3 Butler Jean Fashion New York Times 5 June 1977 SM35 4 Ibid Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post Absolute disregard for the established laws of color Bah The only reason you learn the rules is so you know how to properly break them later I believe that there really is a difference in the work produced by people who know the rules and bend break or ignore them and people who never knew the rules in the first place

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2010/01/stephen-burrows.html (2016-02-12)
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