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  • FIDM Museum Blog: June 2015
    swimsuits Alfred Shaheen c 1970 Gift of Jane Calhoun 2007 918 10AB Hawaii experienced a tourist boom in the postwar period thanks to faster jet travel and Hawaiian statehood in 1959 The Aloha shirt was an essential souvenir and a key ingredient in the burgeoning Tiki nightlife scene Shaheen originally imported textiles from the mainland but he soon grew frustrated by delays and inconsistent quality So he built his own factory printing plant and dyeworks on Oahu to manufacture artistic textiles and garments inspired by the cultures of the Polynesia and Asia By 1952 he was producing more than 60 000 yards of fabric per month in his signature bold exotic prints Elvis Presley wore a red Alfred Shaheen Aloha shirt on the cover of his 1961 soundtrack album Blue Hawaii giving Hawaiian style and Shaheen the ultimate celebrity endorsement Today vintage Shaheen shirts can sell for hundreds of dollars 2007 918 10AB You didn t need to buy a plane ticket to dress like an islander Until Shaheen retired in 1988 his clothes were sold by upscale mainland department stores and boutiques The donor purchased this polyester maxi dress printed with oversized tulips at Kemo s Polynesian Shop in landlocked Arcadia California Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments 0 June 05 2015 Fundraising Friday Chanel s Little Black Dress The FIDM Museum is in the final months of a major fundraising campaign to purchase the Helen Larson Historic Fashion Collection a private collection of 1 200 historic garments and accessories from four centuries Each Friday this blog will present an exquisite piece from the Larson collection Last week s post featured a black mourning gown worn by the 4 7 Queen Victoria This week we bring you a very different kind of little black dress designed by Gabrielle Coco Chanel Coco Chanel c 1926 Helen Larson Historic Fashion Collection On October 1 1926 Vogue published a fashion plate of a knee length black crêpe de chine day dress paired with a cloche hat and a pearl necklace Here is a Ford signed Chanel the frock that all the world will wear the magazine declared This was not Chanel s first little black dress in 1919 she had produced an entire collection of them But by 1926 the style was recognized as a modern wardrobe staple the Ford of fashion Little did not refer to the garment s size but to its simplicity Chanel called them little nothing dresses This evening version of the little black dress actually a top and underdress is entirely covered in black bugle beads We can easily picture it on a 1920s flapper yet it is so timeless that it could just as easily be worn today Detail Chanel is just one of the iconic designers represented in the Larson collection others include Paquin Fortuny Lanvin Poiret Lucile Worth and Doucet Helen Larson spent 50 years assembling this who s who of fashion history now it is in danger of being dispersed forever or absorbed

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2015/06/page/2/ (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: What's New, Pussycat?
    was just coming into its own as a fashion capital The country s second largest apparel market was best known for its inexpensive sportswear but Pearson joined an emerging group of serious designers lured west by the chance to run their own businesses outside the Seventh Avenue establishment including James Galanos Rudi Gernreich and Gustave Tassell 2003 40 59 Young and handsome with a square jaw and a Southern drawl Pearson looked as if he d stepped out of one of the classic Hollywood films from which he drew inspiration The fashion press even compared him to another attractive charismatic newcomer Yves Saint Laurent who had take over the house of Dior in 1957 Although Pearson had declared at the outset of his career that he d never move to Paris he did just that in 1967 As the Los Angles Times reported he became so frustrated with the fashion industry that one day he threw dozens of his signature pussycat bows into the air and walked away from his business After a two year Parisian sabbatical during which he studied traditional couture dressmaking techniques Pearson began returning to Los Angeles twice a year to design collections under his own name for the dress manufacturer Lee Gersten Inc this printed wool dress is one of his Lee Gersten pieces By 1975 he had returned to Los Angeles for good and joined the FIDM faculty In 1983 Pearson made history in his adopted state by designing the gown Gloria Deukmejian wore to the inaugural ball of her husband California Governor George Deukmejian Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post Verify your Comment Previewing your Comment Posted by This is only a preview Your comment has not yet been

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2015/05/william-pearson-.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Happy Memorial Day!
    synonymous with ladylike restraint However much of his inspiration actually came from practical functional menswear this silk dress is reminiscent of a jockey s racing silks With his taste for simple body skimming silhouettes Norell was not inconvenienced by World War II restrictions on yardages and materials He added visual interest to his spare designs by using bold colors in contrasting hues 2003 794 23AB Norell was the first American designer to have his name on a dress label the first to market a namesake fragrance and the first to receive the Coty Award As founder and president of the Council of Fashion Designers of America he nurtured a generation of American designers Appropriately in 2010 Michelle Obama wore a vintage Norell dress to a Christmas concert in Washington D C the first time a First Lady has chosen a vintage dress for a public event Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post Verify your Comment Previewing your Comment Posted by This is only a preview Your comment has not yet been posted Your comment could not be posted Error type Your comment has been saved Comments

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2015/05/norrell-silk-day-dress-4th-of-july.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Spotted: Elegance in Black and White
    sourced on her travels to India China and South America She was also a frequent visitor to Paris where she drew inspiration from the haute couture and adapted it for American lifestyles Although her clothes were never flamboyant or avant garde Simpson was a pioneer in her own quiet way She introduced cotton and sari fabric for eveningwear adding an unconventional twist to her conservative silhouettes And she often used black in her spring and summer looks including this one 2003 792 1A C At a time when many of America s top designers were men Simpson claimed to understand women s lifestyles and bodies better than her male competitors As she told the New York Times on April 24 1967 I like to feel I am dressing women not just making dresses Simpson described her typical customer She s busy with charity work if she doesn t have a job She doesn t take hours to get dressed She has no maid to take care of her wardrobe and she travels a lot Simpson s clients certainly did keep busy They included First Ladies Mamie Eisenhower Lady Bird Johnson Pat Nixon Rosalynn Carter and Barbara Bush ballerina Margot Fonteyn actresses Claudette Colbert Elizabeth Taylor and Audrey Meadows and journalist Barbara Walters Simpson specialized in streamlined coordinated dress and jacket combinations like this one which could go from day to evening with minimal fuss Although Simpson retired in 1985 her company continued producing ladylike suits into the 1990s a remarkably long lifespan for a fashion label Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post Verify your Comment Previewing your Comment Posted by This is only a preview Your comment has not yet been posted Your comment could not

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2015/05/adele-simpson.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Lazy Daisies of Summer
    a natural exfoliant Florida is a leading producer of loofah and Eason s hat makes ingenious use of this native crop Archie Eason c 1955 Museum Purchase 2009 5 9 By 1958 Eason s hats signed with a green sequin at the back were available in 47 cities nationwide each retailer received only one of each style to ensure that no two customers would be caught wearing the same hat A 1958 profile in W omen s Wear Daily praised the milliner s creative flair and eye for color and shape Eason never sketched but let his materials dictate his designs Though hats were rumored to be on their way out of fashion throughout the 1950s and 60s Eason refused to worry saying There isn t a woman in the world who doesn t like a pretty hat Detail In 1960 Eason moved to New York where he began making hats for Seventh Avenue designers like George Stavropoulos and Donald Brooks His talent for working with nontraditional materials served him well for blocked hats were being replaced by soft caps turbans berets kerchiefs fezzes and cloches of fabric and fur Buyers do not want hat hats Eason explained They are definitely going for youth In December 1966 at at time when many fashion designers were branching out into youth oriented boutique collections Eason launched Archie Baby an inexpensive line of hats aimed at girls ages 4 to 16 adapted from his adult designs But it failed to inspire a new generation of hat lovers or a new use for loofah Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post Verify your Comment Previewing your Comment Posted by This is only a preview Your comment has not yet been posted

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2015/05/lazy-daisies-of-summer.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Let Them Eat Cake: Marie Antoinette Re-Mixed
    Dress from The Helen Larson Historic Fashion Collection See the shows meet the artists and enjoy French treats Fashion illustrator and FIDM instructor Nancy Riegelman will be sketching live in the FIDM Museum Foyer RSVP to RSVP fidmmuseum org Robe Volante France c 1745 Helen Larson Historic Fashion Collection L2011 13 991AB If you can t make it to the opening night reception check out the sketches and Opulent Art on display Tuesday Saturday 10am 5pm through July 2 As always our shows are free to the public Please see the museum s website for directions and parking information Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post Verify your Comment Previewing your Comment Posted by This is only a preview Your comment has not yet been posted Your comment could not be posted Error type Your comment has been saved Comments are moderated and will not appear until approved by the author Post another comment The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image Please try again As a final step before posting your comment enter the letters and numbers you see in the image below

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2015/05/let-them-eat-cake-marie-antoinette-re-mixed.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: May 2015
    intricately constructed gowns inspired by ethnic dress and Renaissance and Symbolist painting In contrast to the starkly minimalist Space Age fashions of the 60s his taste for prints and ornamentation anticipated flower power By the late 1970s however he had dropped the di from his name and embraced a sleeker body conscious aethestic designed for a new fashion stage the discotheque Giorgio Sant Angelo 1976 79 Gift of Betye Burton S2014 145 9 This asymmetrical dress in electric purple silk charmeuse currently on display in FIDM s 2nd floor lobby embraces the drama glamour and fantasy of the disco scene The shimmering swaying textile would have reflected light like a disco ball Flying panels and a flowing sleeve give the dress a sense of freedom that was perfectly in tune with the Me Decade Sant Angelo had this amazing way of creating volume remembers Inacio Ribeiro of the British label Clements Ribeiro He abandoned zippers in favor of clinging or billowing textiles that moved with the body An acclaimed swimwear designer he was comfortable working with stretch fabrics which were just beginning to move into the everyday female wardrobe These comfortable form fitting garments were ideal for modern working women

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2015/05/page/2/ (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Happy Earth Day!
    the outraged outspoken younger generation T shirt Anvil c 1975 80 Gift of Dorothy Washington Sorensen 2010 1110 209 This T shirt by Anvil in the FIDM Museum combines typical environmentalist imagery with a popular feminist slogan A woman s place is every place A woman s place was no longer in the home but the whole planet Women used their newfound freedom and mobility to support worthy causes like Earth Day Detail of 2010 1110 209 The protester wearing a T shirt and no bra would become a stereotype of the 1970s counterculture But these walking billboards were undeniably effective The Environmental Protection Agency was founded in 1970 just a few months after the first Earth Day Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post Verify your Comment Previewing your Comment Posted by This is only a preview Your comment has not yet been posted Your comment could not be posted Error type Your comment has been saved Comments are moderated and will not appear until approved by the author Post another comment The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image Please try again

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2015/04/happy-earth-day.html (2016-02-12)
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