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  • FIDM Museum Blog: From the Archives: Giorgio di Sant' Angelo, Fall 1969
    late 1960s Vogue Some of his most memorable creations were worn by the model Veruschka including a gold chain bikini and improvisational garments in an editorial ostensibly focusing on new fabrics for 1968 Photographed in Arizona s Painted Desert and called The Magnificent Mirage the editorial featured Veruschka swaddled in layers of fabric and fur secured with artfully placed cords or leather thongs Later in Sant Angelo s career braided cord and thin ribbons of fabric would become important elements in his designs 95 193 2 Hem detail Sant Angelo s first collection of clothing was featured in the March 7 1969 issue of Life The collection features all the basic elements of his aesthetic vibrant patterns textures wrapping and tying and an interest in showcasing the body A Tyrolean dress highlights Sant Angelo s restless borrowing from a variety of cultures and influences including Native American Asian and South America The full article including images can be found here Released just a few months after the Life article Sant Angelo s Fall 1969 collection featured another group of exuberant designs According to Dennita Sewell curator of the 2011 Giorgio di Sant Angelo exhibit at the Phoenix Art Museum the Fall 1969 collection featured a diversity of inspirations including tango dancers Gustav Klimt paintings and medieval illuminated manuscripts 1 The patchwork dress seen here is Sant Angelo s Klimt dress named after the Austrian painter Gustav Klimt The fantastical patchwork garment portrayed in Klimt s famous 1907 painting of Adele Bloch Bauer was perhaps the inspiration for Sant Angelo s flowing gold trimmed patchwork dress 95 193 2 Back view This particular Sant Angelo dress is well documented appearing in advertisements and a 1969 Vogue editorial shot by Irving Penn In the Vogue spread the dress was perhaps overshadowed by

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2015/01/from-the-archives-giorgio-di-sant-angelo-fall-1969.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: From the Archives: Court gown and train
    who had already been presented at court During Edward and Alexandra s reign American women presented at court were always sponsored by the wife of the American ambassador In her application the sponsor vouched for the character of the presentee ensuring that only women of good character were presented Under no circumstances could a woman who wanted to be presented make an application for herself All applicants were investigated before being accepted for presentation Women eligible for presentation included wives and daughters of the aristocracy clergy navy or military officers and certain aristocratic professions including physicians and barristers Ineligible women included divorcees who were considered legally at fault for the divorce and actresses The actual presentation itself was a brief affair After waiting her turn the presentee and her sponsor were announced by name and entered the throne room Approaching the King and Queen the presentee stopped to curtsy in front of each sovereign The manner of the curtsy was of great importance and women who didn t curtsy correctly to both the King and Queen were criticized by those in attendance The presentee then stepped to the side and backed gracefully away from the King and Queen Pages were meant to help each women with her train as she backed out of the room but according to a 1908 account they liked to tease the presentees by sometimes throwing a woman s train over her head 3 It is hard to imagine such silliness taking place in front of the King and Queen but perhaps they were so absorbed in curtsy watching that they didn t notice 2008 932 19AB Bodice detail At the time of her presentation Ann Bloomfield Gamble Post was married to American author Melville Davisson Post Though we don t know all the details regarding Post s presentation at court we do know who made her court gown Redfern Active from 1847 1940 Redfern s reputation was founded on stylish daywear including tailormade suits and sporting dress for women In the 1890s Redfern expanded into evening wear ball gowns and court dress Initially based in London Redfern also operated branches in Paris and New York Required elements of court dress included short sleeves low cut bodice lengthy train and accessories including plumes gloves and veil Though white was not absolutely required it was considered the most suitable color for both married and unmarried women If in mourning it was acceptable to wear mourning colors such as black and white gray or mauve For women who from illness infirmity or advancing age could not wear the low cut bodice it was possible to obtain a dispensation and wear a higher bodice and longer sleeves 4 The number and color of plumes was also regulated three for married women two for unmarried Plumes were always worn with a white veil or lace lappets White kidskin gloves were a necessity though women could choose whether to carry flowers or a fan The train on our court dress is

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2015/01/from-the-archives-court-gown-and-train.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Update on the FIDM Museum Marriage Proposal!
    the help of Curator Kevin Jones you can read Kevin s account of that magical moment here Trevor and Amollia were married on September 7 2014 and we are thrilled that the happy couple stayed in touch and shared a few beautiful pictures from their wedding day Amollia designed and sewed her gorgeous gown we hope the BLISS exhibition was a source of inspiration for her We are so excited to have been a part of Trevor and Amollia s story and we wish these lovely newlyweds all the best Amollia in the dress she designed and sewed Amollia and Trevor on their wedding day Mr and Mrs Clarke Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post Verify your Comment Previewing your Comment Posted by This is only a preview Your comment has not yet been posted Your comment could not be posted Error type Your comment has been saved Comments are moderated and will not appear until approved by the author Post another comment The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image Please try again As a final step before posting your comment enter

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2015/01/update-on-the-fidm-museum-marriage-proposal.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Love is in the Air (or at least in the Galleries) at the FIDM Museum!
    Collection Perfect The future groom wanted to pop the question at the end of the tour and in what better environment than surrounded by a century of beautiful bridal wear Bells were ringing in my ears I was going to play cupid To help out with this surreptitious romance our future bridegroom s parents were commissioned to prepare the scene for the BIG QUESTION and younger brother was on hand to take photos they all hid in the back of the Galleries until the moment of truth I loaned a card table from the Museum office and the soon to be in laws set out a lovely tablecloth flowers and a suitcase Yes an old brown leather suitcase Inside was a sign that lifted up when the case was opened asking Will You Marry Me It was made of white foam core and had been punched through with a sharp instrument forming the letters then threaded through with red it was Valentine s Day yarn spelling out the words in stitches Remember our bride loves to sew Obviously this was very well thought out But our romantic lead had planned a more permanent expression of his love and creativity with THE RING Yes mom gave me a sneak peak it s lovely diamonds And engraved around the underside is a needle and thread a fitting symbol for tying the knot By the way she said Yes The Proposal Standing outside the Gallery with a long lens our bridegroom s younger brother caught the moment of truth Yes Always watching a security camera records the drama of the first proposal in the FIDM Museum Galleries that we know of and we sent the recording to the happy couple Success Introducing Trevor and Amollia the future Mr Mrs Clarke Congratulations We at

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2014/03/love-is-in-the-air-or-at-least-in-the-galleries-at-the-fidm-museum.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: From the Archives: Helmut Lang
    appearance of the textile evoke deconstruction Though elements of the dress can be traced back in time Lang combined them without much concern for the past As Lang stated in a 1994 interview I think the history and the past we have is just an energy we ve built up to do what we do now 2 2011 800 1 Textile detail Born in Austria Helmut Lang b 1956 studied fashion design in his home country opening his own studio in the late 1970s In 1986 he presented his first Paris runway show Lang s early work lacked the unadorned modernist aesthetic of the dress seen here In 1986 Vogue featured a dark green boiled wool Tyrolean jacket adorned with double rows of buttons or piping for obvious charm by the young Austrian Helmut Lang 3 By the mid 1990s however Lang s understated aesthetic had developed to the point where he was frequently grouped with other neo modernist designers including Martin Margiela Ann Demeulemeester and Jil Sander The influence of these minimalist designers indicated a new mood in fashion one that rejected the opulent decadent fashions of the 1980s 2011 800 1 Helmut Lang expanded his brand rapidly and by the year 2000 his name adorned menswear womenswear underwear shoes jeans accessories perfume even eyewear Prada purchased a majority share in the company in late 2000 and Lang continued to design for the label until retiring from fashion in 2005 Though the Helmut Lang label still exists it is no longer designed by its namesake Today Lang is an active visual artist with frequent exhibitions Explore this work here 1 Helmut Lang Fresh Glitter Amy M Spindler New York Times July 17 1994 33 2 Ibid 3 Vogue s View Tyroleans Vogue Oct 1 1986 430 Posted by FIDM

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2014/12/from-the-archives-helmut-lang.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Deconstruction in fashion
    this context and her work remains challenging to this day During the 1980s deconstructed garments appeared on Paris runways in the work of Japanese designers such as Yohji Yamamoto and Rei Kawakubo who presented black and gray garments created of distressed and worn textiles that enveloped rather than accentuated the body These garments were called obscure complicated and intellectual but were also widely influential From these controversial origins elements of deconstruction have become a widely accepted part of the fashion vocabulary appearing on both mass market T shirts and fashion runways 2003 38 1 Side view Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post I suppose I d react more strongly to it if it was worn by someone on the dummy it looks more like an artistic artifact so I m rather admiring the fabric itself than wondering why it s so tattered Posted by Hana February 26 2010 at 05 19 AM Although when I look back at my comment I probably should have left out the term artistic and replace it with something else I m not quite sure what finely crafted because in the case of art it would more likely make me wonder Not that I want to decide what is art and what is not I m merely trying to describe my own reaction Posted by Hana February 26 2010 at 05 23 AM Deconstructionism allows the artist to see all of the parts each just as important as the whole Posted by San D February 27 2010 at 10 00 AM Hana I think you pinpoint one of the problems with looking at garments off the body Meant to be worn on a body they sometimes don t read quite right without the underlying human form At the same time it is sometimes easier to get a better sense of the intent of the designer without the distraction of a body A troubling contradiction San D good point By breaking things down into their essential elements it is sometimes possible to gain a better understanding of the whole Posted by FIDM Museum March 01 2010 at 12 20 PM i don t like how the tag shows through the netting in the back i suppose it would be de rigueur to REMOVE a label something i do as soon as i purchase a garment since they scratch the sensitive nape of my neck that being said i am fond of ripped seams tattered and torn ribbon faded leather rusted metal unintentional design in the making Posted by nina March 01 2010 at 03 24 PM Hi Nina We typically leave all labels in the garments as they are part of the history of that particular object Often they include information such as the date that is helpful in contextualizing the object That said I m with you on removing labels from garments that I m going to wear Posted by FIDM

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2010/02/deconstruction-in-fashion.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Evening ensemble, c. 1982
    skirt are bold design elements characteristic of 1980s fashion The decade also enjoyed renewed appreciation for applied decoration which added substantially to the cost of a garment Here wide bands of bead sequin and rhinestone embroidery were affixed to emerald green velvet in a meandering floral pattern Though in tune with the time this ensemble also harkens back to the silhouette and materials of the 1890s an era favored by the designer 2006 116 46AB Waist detail Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post Verify your Comment Previewing your Comment Posted by This is only a preview Your comment has not yet been posted Your comment could not be posted Error type Your comment has been saved Comments are moderated and will not appear until approved by the author Post another comment The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image Please try again As a final step before posting your comment enter the letters and numbers you see in the image below This prevents automated programs from posting comments Having trouble reading this image View an alternate Post a comment Comments are moderated and

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2010/12/evening-ensemble-c-1982.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: From the Archives: Embroidered girl's ensemble
    Silk faille cotton embroidery floss mother of pearl Museum Purchase 2010 5 4A C Pink for girls and blue for boys is a twentieth century adage these colors were not always gendered this way During the nineteenth century pink was seen as a shade of red a forceful color aligned with traditional masculinity and thus appropriate for growing boys Blue was symbolic of the Virgin Mary and conventional femininity making the dainty shade suitable for little girls Colors aside young girls and boys alike were clad in skirts as a testament to their residency in the nursery a feminine realm of mothers and nursemaids Clothing construction was gender specific girls dresses buttoned up the back training them to require help dressing while boys had center front closures preparing them to be self sufficient Both the hand embroidered blue butterflies fluttering around this ensemble and its back fastening bodice confirms that it was made for a little girl The butterfly motif has long signified the transience of childhood youngsters grow quickly into adults just as butterflies metamorphose from caterpillars Significant too is the suggestion of chasing butterflies a spring pastime traditionally depicted as part of childhood play The link between butterflies and childhood was carried into the twentieth century this 1920s hand painted Dainty Blossom ensemble also features fanciful butterflies Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post Verify your Comment Previewing your Comment Posted by This is only a preview Your comment has not yet been posted Your comment could not be posted Error type Your comment has been saved Comments are moderated and will not appear until approved by the author Post another comment The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image Please try

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2014/12/from-the-archives-embroidered-girls-ensemble.html (2016-02-12)
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