archive-org.com » ORG » F » FIDMMUSEUM.ORG

Total: 762

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • FIDM Museum Blog: A Century of Cotton: Selections from The Helen Larson Historic Fashion Collection, 1800-1900
    selected cotton garments and accessories from The Helen Larson Historic Fashion Collection Beginning in the late seventeenth century lightweight cotton fabrics gradually supplanted the dominance of fragile and expensive silks As cotton became increasingly popular fashionable dress incorporated this new medium into its vocabulary Including woven printed and embroidered cottons A Century of Cotton also traces the dramatic changes that occurred in the fashionable female silhouette between 1800 and 1900 Afternoon Dress United States c 1908 Cotton embroidered linen cotton crochet lace L2011 13 1060 Hat Europe or United States c 1908 Cotton floral trim straw L2011 13 538 Helen Larson Historic Fashion Collection Proposed FIDM Museum Acquisitions Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post Verify your Comment Previewing your Comment Posted by This is only a preview Your comment has not yet been posted Your comment could not be posted Error type Your comment has been saved Comments are moderated and will not appear until approved by the author Post another comment The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image Please try again As a final step before posting your comment enter the

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2013/01/a-century-of-cotton-selections-from-the-helen-larson-historic-fashion-collection-1800-1900.html (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • FIDM Museum Blog: Accessories from The Helen Larson Historic Fashion Collection
    and hats these objects demonstrate Helen Larson s acquisition prowess and appreciation of fashion history From a pair of 1860s men s floral Berlin woolwork slippers to a 1930s crimson reptile skin handbag the importance of adornment is not lost on the viewer of this visually striking installation Accessories from The Helen Larson Historic Fashion Collection is FREE and open to the public Monday through Saturday 10am 5pm The exhibition is located in The Annette Green Fragrance Archive on the second floor of FIDM s Los Angeles campus Check in is required at the security station on the ground floor There are no fragrance related objects on display at this time Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post Wonderful collection Posted by Katie Evans January 29 2013 at 02 42 PM Totally agree with Katie This collection is blowing my mind away Posted by Dmitriy March 30 2015 at 06 22 AM Verify your Comment Previewing your Comment Posted by This is only a preview Your comment has not yet been posted Your comment could not be posted Error type Your comment has been saved Comments are

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2012/10/accessories-from-the-helen-larson-historic-fashion-collection.html (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • FIDM Museum Blog: 21st Annual Art of Motion Picture Costume Design exhibition is now open!
    White as Elizabeth Blair Lee Sally Field as Mary Todd Lincoln Daniel Day Lewis as Abraham Lincoln Sally Field as Mary Todd Lincoln Mirror Mirror by Costume Designer Eiko Ishioka L to R Costumes Armie Hammer as Prince Alcott Lily Collins as Snow White Julia Roberts as The Queen Snow White and the Huntsman by Costume Designer Colleen Atwood L to R Costumes Charlize Theron as Ravenna Charlize Theron as Ravenna Charlize Theron as Ravenna Kristen Stewart as Snow White Charlize Theron as Ravenna Chris Hemsworth as The Huntsman Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post I am glad you posted the pictures since I live too far to come see the exhibit What a great exhibit for movie and Oscar fans Posted by S Breshears February 13 2013 at 07 38 PM Yes this is always a very popular exhibit If you re interested in seeing a few more photos visit our Facebook page http on fb me WLewLH Posted by FIDM Museum February 14 2013 at 10 33 AM beautiful exhibit There was a handout avialable that gave a description of each film with comments by the designers Is there a possibility that can be posted or can I get a copy of the descriptions Posted by barbara February 21 2013 at 10 00 AM I ll see what I can do about getting you a copy of the exhibit handout Glad you enjoyed the exhibit Posted by FIDM Museum February 21 2013 at 03 52 PM Fantastic exhibit this year just told my movie group it s a must see I took some friends through it today but we missed the handout which is chock full of fascinating background on the costumes I would

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2013/02/21st-annual-art-of-motion-picture-costume-design-exhibition-is-now-open-.html (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • FIDM Museum Blog: Silk handkerchiefs, c. 1926
    supply of the product declaring it the only way that removes ALL germ laden accumulations from the pores 2 In the early 1930s Kleenex shifted its marketing proposing Kleenex as a sanitary alternative to cloth handkerchiefs This change is clear in a 1932 ad Hay Fever misery relieved by soft disposable tissues instead of damp irritating handkerchiefs use KLEENEX 3 The triumph of disposable Kleenex over reusable cloth is evident by how few people nowadays use cloth handkerchiefs for nasal hygiene 2010 796 1A Box top In the 1920s however handkerchiefs proliferated They were delicate silk squares tucked inside tiny handbags or large folded triangles tied jauntily around the neck According to a 1922 issue of Vogue women s fashion incorporated handkerchiefs in unexpected places it may be a brilliant silk bandanna tied around the curls of the tennis player or thrust through the belt of a gold enthusiast 4 Simple skirts and dresses were complicated by handkerchief hems as seen in this 1921 sketch for a Lucile afternoon dress Panels or squares of material were attached to bodices and skirts fluttering like wings or a gently waved handkerchief when the wearer moved Handkerchiefs also functioned as a canvas for artists to showcase their work Rex Silver a member of the family that founded the Silver Studio print works designed a handkerchief featuring peacock feathers in 1920 Liberty Co renowned for their textile patterns offered its customers a variety of printed handkerchiefs including this sedate navy handkerchief probably intended for a man s use In the late 1930s Jean Cocteau designed a Surrealist tribute to the handkerchief a silk scarf hand printed with disembodied han ds waving handkerchiefs 1 James McCutcheon Co Advertisement Vogue Jan 1 1924 90 2 Kleenex Advertisement Vogue May 15 1926 13 3 Kleenex Advertisement Vogue

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2013/03/silk-handkerchiefs-c-1926.html (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • FIDM Museum Blog: Moschino Couture! evening gown, 1992
    la francaise layered with swags bows and lace Because of her notorious reputation and elevated social position Marie Antoinette is an excellent choice for a masquerade costume Historically masquerades and costume balls were an opportunity to disrupt the established social order liberating participants from social and economic hierarchies And what s more liberating than discarding your everyday dress and assuming the garb and persona of someone else Aristocrats dressed as milkmaids milkmaids donned queenly robes and social hierarchies were thoroughly if temporarily confused By the eighteenth century masquerades were a popular form of entertainment throughout Europe Some masquerades were ticketed events held in public venues while others were more intimate celebrations held at private homes Large or small public or private the anonymity of a masquerade offered opportunities for transgression and indiscretion The Yew Tree Bal l held in 1745 to celebrate the marriage of Louis XV to Maria Theresa of Spain demonstrates how masquerades could mask illicit behavior Though recently wed Louis XV disguised himself as a yew tree using the ball as an opportunity to rendezvous with Jeanne Antoinette Poisson a young woman who had recently caught his eye She became his mistress and as Madame de Pompadour she dominated the French court and French fashion until her death in 1764 2010 1007 1 As strict behavioral codes have loosened the popularity of masquerades and costume balls has waned Still popular in the early 20th century by the end of the 1920s festive masquerades were a novelty The most famous costume ball of the 20th century was Truman Capote s 1966 Black and White Ball Hosted by Capote at New York s Plaza Hotel attendees were masked and clad in black and white costumes The guest list was a true hodge podge of American and international celebrity including

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2013/03/moschino-couture-evening-gown-1992.html (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • FIDM Museum Blog: Jeanne Lanvin fashion figure
    croquis from the Lanvin Archive reveals this modѐle s title Rose Poupon which translates to Plump Rose It is also a play on words referencing the fashion figures of the eighteenth century called poupées or dolls that were sent worldwide to showcase the latest Paris fashions Lanvin s romantic robe de style a full skirted dress with concentrations of gathers at the hips was the antithesis of the sleek tubular silhouette that dominated the 1920s Gathered ribbon roses with hand tinted pink centers trim the neckline and form a trellis on the skirt They were called roses de Polignac after Gabrielle comtesse de Polignac 1749 1793 confidant of Queen Marie Antoinette 1755 1793 Lanvin s daughter and muse Marie Blanche 1897 1958 was a twentieth century comtesse de Polignac 1 Vogue April 1 1921 42 43 Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post Wow it looks to be in such great condition I don t know if I ve ever seen anything so adorable and creepy at the same time LOVE IT Posted by Michele Devine March 01 2013 at 08 49 AM I ve always found her intimidating That intense gaze Despite her elegant evening gown I certainly wouldn t want to meet her in a dark alley Posted by FIDM Museum March 01 2013 at 11 01 AM What a fantastic find What is the size of this piece Posted by Christine A March 03 2013 at 12 25 PM Hi Christine She s 23 inches tall Anything much smaller would make the dress details hard to distinguish at any distance Posted by FIDM Museum March 04 2013 at 09 19 AM Verify your Comment Previewing your Comment Posted by This is only a preview

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2013/02/jeanne-lanvin-fashion-figure.html (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • FIDM Museum Blog: Robe de style
    very much in tune with those worn by women of greater financial means Given that this particular dress is black and that the embellishment of the robe de style was thought to flourish best under the electric lights this dress was certainly worn to an evening function 1 Despite this association with nightlife softly colored pink cream and peach versions of the robe de style gained popularity as wedding gowns If you looked closely at the date you may have been surprised to see that this dress is dated to c 1923 Popular images of 1920s dress focus primarily on the classic flapper dress a very short sleeveless shift dress with fringe or beading The robe de style was also popular during the twenties though it was thought to be a classic and somewhat safe choice It was considered appropriate for women of all ages from debutante to matron The flapper shift was more cutting edge and was marketed towards stylistically younger and more fashion conscious women As one fashion commentator wrote in 1925 The robe de style has a persevering nature Fashions may come and fashions may go but it keeps on forever 2 1 At the Reception Following the Daytime Wedding The Washington Post 2 Feb 1925 SM6 2 Ibid Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post This dress was created by our nana Rosalba McMillen She was an excellent seamstress and professional needlepointer She was commissioned to do needlepoint for a store in the Farmers Market in Los Angeles CA She made all of my sisters and my dresses She also knitted all of our sweaters She was born on Feb 13 1888 and died on Easter Sunday 1969 She is interned in Forest

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2009/07/robe-de-style.html (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • FIDM Museum Blog: Prada orchid shoes, Spring/Summer 2008
    for Prada s Spring Summer 2008 line Jean s sinuous illustrations were enlarged as a backdrop for the fashion show and advertising campaign in addition to being printed on clothing purses and shoeboxes His fantasy world came to life in Trembled Blossoms a short animated film produced to correspond with the Prada collection Transformation and fragility pervade the movie a naked nymph like woman emerges from an orchid to be dressed in a complete Prada wardrobe by magical forest creatures that morph into clothing Orchids blossom on the heels of this pair of pumps their glossy sheen suggests hand painted porcelain The rich floral palette and girlish bows continue the theme of enchanting female charm Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post What cute shoes I see a lot of shoes in my job but these are pretty special Posted by S Breshears February 13 2013 at 07 35 PM Verify your Comment Previewing your Comment Posted by This is only a preview Your comment has not yet been posted Your comment could not be posted Error type Your comment has been saved Comments are moderated and

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2013/02/prada-orchid-shoes-springsummer-2008.html (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive



  •