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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Lanz Original, late 1940s
    bright colors on cotton fabric Lanz textile designs also had a whimsical feel Named Gingerbread Mountain House Noah s Ark and Little Man they evoked a quaint storybook feel The unidentified red and white pattern lining this green wool jacket is classic Lanz Note the figures dressed in Tyrolean style and the fairytale style house Jacket lining detail c 1946 Lanz Original Gift of Patricia Marks 2003 45 3 Sometime in the mid 1930s Josef Lanz emigrated to the United States probably in an attempt to capitalize on the popularity of the Lanz brand By 1938 Lanz opened a Lanz of Salzburg store in Manhattan The New York branch of Lanz continued in the tradition of the original Salzburg location specializing in ski apparel and women s casual sportswear with a Tyrolean look A Los Angeles store was open by 1940 At some point in the early 1940s Lanz of Salzburg became Lanz Originals Dropping Salzburg from the brand name was probably a wise move Austria was forcibly annexed to Germany in 1938 during the build up to World War II Once the United States entered the war in 1941 an association with either Germany or Austria would have been bad for business Despite the name change Lanz Originals still maintained a rustic look The embroidered strawberries and brass buttons decorating this late 40s Lanz jacket are a clear nod to the origins of the label as is the patterned lining Brass buttons were a common feature on Lanz jackets and blouses A 1936 advertisement for a fitted Lanz of Salzburg blouse with puffed sleeves noted this feature calling the buttons made from Tyrolean coins so much much smarter than ordinary buttons 3 These details which reference traditional Austrian dress not fashion forward runway designs can make it difficult to

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2012/03/lanz-original-late-1940s.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: 1970s Gunne Sax dresses
    early 1970s featured a banded Empire waist and a long maxi skirt Lace trim high collars and long sleeves evoked an amalgam of past eras and created an overall impression of demure femininity A 1971 advertisement for a flower printed cotton voile Gunne Sax dress captured the company s aesthetic bringing back memories of yesteryear in a dress of total charm and innocence 2 The laced bodice and pink quilted insert of the Gunne Sax dress pictured above suggest popular conceptions of medieval dress The sumptuous gown portrayed in this 15th century tapestry is an example of the style that might have inspired this Gunne Sax dress Though Gunne Sax dresses suggested the past they were constructed from thoroughly modern materials Most Gunne Sax dresses were made from cotton and or synthetic fibers like polyester acetate nylon or rayon In the pink and white dress above the pink quilted panel and the lace trim are synthetic The use of inexpensive easy clean materials meant that a Gunne Sax dress was both washable and affordable Gunne Sax s target customer was a young woman in her teens or twenties Marketing materials featured small groups of young women often with long slightly wavy hair parted in the middle Gunne Sax dresses could be purchased from a variety of youth oriented boutiques including the Young Circle Dress Collections Sak s Fifth Avenue and Young Attitude Dresses Bullock s By 1975 Gunne Sax had introduced a prom collection with the same storybook feel as its day dresses Lingerie and children s collections soon followed A line of patterns in conjunction with Simplicity allowed customers to sew their own Gunne Sax dress Gunne Sax c 1977 Museum Purchase S2004 5 26 Though based on McClintock s specific ideas about romance and nostalgia the overall aesthetic can be linked to the late 1960s and early 1970s Long hemlines had emerged in the late 1960s a counterculture revolt against the 1960s miniskirt This same counterculture also legitimized the incorporation of diverse sources into fashion non western historic and highly individual combinations of influences and garment intermingled in street and runway fashion Our 1969 Giorgio di Sant Angelo Klimt dress exemplifies this trend as does this late 60s menswear ensemble Gunne Sax dresses with their mix of vaguely historic elements demonstrate this aspect of late 60s and early 70s fashion This pink and black floral print dress trimmed with lace is a classic Gunne Sax prairie dress Similar dresses and skirts with a variety of trim and detail were produced into the 1980s The small scale floral patterns and high neck are borrowed from the printed calico house and work dresses worn in the early 20th century During this same era calico was also used for young girl s dresses The darker palette is typical of later 1970s Gunne Sax dresses 1 Ballis Douglas California Designers Art and Style USA Peregrine Smith Books 1987 104 2 Advertisement Los Angeles Times 15 Oct 1971 G9 Posted by FIDM Museum

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2012/02/1970s-gunne-sax-dresses.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Fred Astaire's dancing shoes
    after Adele retired Fred Astaire moved to Hollywood and began a long career in film and television In 1933 he had a bit part as himself in the Joan Crawford Clark Gable film Dancing Lady That same year he had a larger role in Flying Down to Rio This film featured the first onscreen pairing of Astaire and Ginger Rogers they would be a famous performing duo In this clip from Flying Down to Rio Rogers and Astaire interpret a Latin style dance Their dance begins at about three minutes L88 1 125AB This pair of brown suede tap shoes worn by Fred Astaire date from the 1930s We are still working to determine exactly when and where they were worn Several biographers of Fred Astaire have noted his perfectionist tendencies He reportedly practiced practiced and practiced again to achieve his fluid elegant dance persona These well worn shoes bear witness to this effort Even today Astaire is considered a style icon He is often remembered in elegant formal dress as he wore in the 1935 film Top Hat In his 1959 autobiography Astaire admitted his dislike of formal wear writing At the risk of disillusionment I must admit that I don t like top hats white ties and tails 1 He was fastidious about his wardrobe and had strong ideas about how men should dress In an extensive GQ interview from August 1957 Astaire detailed his style preferences including his taste in tie width shirt cuffs and tailoring Most notable is Astaire s preference for using silk handkerchiefs instead of belts To get the full story on Fred Astaire s personal style read the interview here L88 1 125AB 1 Astaire Fred Steps in Time New York Harper Brothers 1959 8 Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2012/04/fred-astaires-dancing-shoes.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Embroidered bodice, c. 1905
    by synthetic aniline dyes Compare the color of this two tone purple c 1872 day dress to the soft color of the bodice pictured here Transparency was another important theme and many women s garments from this period feature sheer layers of fabric accented with lace embroidery or other trim This c 1903 raspberry pink day dress by Jacques Doucet features transparent layers and the same sleeve seen on our bodice The leg o mutton sleeve full at the shoulders and tapered to the wrist pictured here was popular but shared the stage with other sleeves Bishop sleeves and puffed sleeves restrained with ties or bows are also seen in garments from this decade This bodice was probably once part of a two piece ensemble Two piece dresses were common with bodice and skirt usually made from matching fabric In an era when strict rules dictated appropriate dress for time of day and specific events the high collar and long sleeves indicate when this bodice would have been worn Ball gowns the most formal level of dress usually featured short sleeves and a revealing neckline Dinner gowns usually featured a high neckline and elbow length sleeves Day dresses were the most conservative with high collars and wrist length sleeves Because of its high collar and long sleeves we can make an educated guess that this bodice was once part of a two piece day ensemble Though its highly unlikely we ll ever find the matching skirt we do know where this bodice was made A green and ivory label inside the bodice reads Mmes Aubrejeac F Bonnesseur 113 Rue Réaumur PARIS Early 20th century Paris was home to the most famous garment makers in the world American women who could afford the journey travelled to Paris one or two times

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2012/05/embroidered-bodice-c-1905.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Video from the Costume Colloquium III
    button reading 9 11 2012 her presentation is the second listed According to the Costume Colloquium s website you ll need to view the video using either the Internet Explorer or Chrome browsers Pictured below is the c 1878 wedding gown that started Christina s research on Doris Langley Moore almost 10 years ago She was first introduced to this princess line gown by Moore s book The Woman in Fashion In 2001 the gown was donated to the FIDM Museum by the Helen Larson Estate Readers watch the video of Christina s presentation to see how this wedding gown fits into her research Wedding Gown c 1878 2001 31 4 Gift of the Helen Larson Estate Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post Verify your Comment Previewing your Comment Posted by This is only a preview Your comment has not yet been posted Your comment could not be posted Error type Your comment has been saved Comments are moderated and will not appear until approved by the author Post another comment The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image Please try again As

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2012/12/video-from-the-costume-colloquium-iii.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: L'Aimant by Coty, 1950s
    accidentally dropped a bottle filling the store with La Rose Jacqueminot Customers drawn by the scent purchased Coty s remaining supply and the store offered to stock his products Within two years Coty was a multimillionaire and one of France s most successful perfumers By the time of Coty s death in 1934 he had produced more than 30 unique fragrances In North America French fragrance was primarily a luxury product until after World War I At the end of the war soldiers returning home purchased French perfume as gifts for their favorite women Housed in elegant glass bottles made by Baccarat or Lalique and nestled in silk lined boxes Coty s perfumes were especially appealing Receiving these gifts women of varied means developed an appetite for this stylish new accessory French perfumers including Francois Coty responded by offering their products throughout North America In some cases these fragrances were actually produced in the United States though their aura was indisputably French L Aimant was introduced in 1927 and was one of the last Coty fragrances that Francois Coty had a hand in producing A floral fragrance with notes of rose vanilla citrus musk jasmine and civet it was said to be Coty s response to Chanel No 5 According to one Coty biography L Aimant and Emeraude both Coty fragrances were the only perfumes worn by Mme Jacques Guerlain the wife of Francois Coty s primary business competitor 1 Like all Coty fragrances L Aimant was available in many forms Bath salts talc powder soaps perfumed powder and fragrance bottles of various sizes allowed a range of consumers access to the scent The image pictured here was probably produced to promote holiday sales of a L Aimant gift set 1 Toledano Roulhac B Elizabeth Z Coty François Coty Fragrance

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2012/12/laimant-by-coty-1950s.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Peter Max umbrella, c. 1968-70
    Though Peter Max distinct illustration style was a signature in itself most of the licensed products also featured his name somewhere in the design Can you spot the words Peter Max on our umbrella Though Peter Max made a fortune licensing his illustrations he also considered the distribution of his work a kind of public service Max believed strongly in the power of positivity and believed that his bright light hearted illustrations of stars rainbows and smiles made the world better and more positive Mass production was simply an extension of this belief a wide range of products allowed more consumers access to Max positive visual messages Max didn t claim credit for the impact of his work but attributed it to a cosmic force In 1969 Max stated It s not me covering the world with my illustrations it s some great cosmic force working through me 4 1 Riley Charles A The Art of Peter Max New York Abrams 2002 23 2 Shulte Ellen How Peter Max Struck It Rich at 28 Los Angeles Times 30 Jan 1969 g14 3 Krier Beth Ann An Artist s Feats in Shoe Design Peter Max Shoes Los Angeles Times 25 Aug 1971 G1 4 Martin Judith Happy Hip Peter Max The Washington Post 16 Nov 1969 F1 Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post I have a fair to good condition of this same umbrella and I d like to know how much I should insure it for Posted by M Lady ND February 07 2014 at 09 29 PM It s great to learn there are other surviving Peter Max umbrellas Our code of ethics prohibits us from offering valuations for objects I d suggest checking online

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2012/12/peter-max-umbrella-c-1968-70.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Ossie Clark ensemble, c. 1969
    Celia Birtwell s vibrant textile patterns were crucial to their appeal The two talented designers met while art students in the late 1950s beginning a friendship that evolved into romance they were married in 1969 and a close creative partnership Birtwell s patterns were swirling fanciful interpretations of the natural world portrayed in vibrant colorways the geometric pattern seen on this maxi dress is somewhat unusual Clark was aware of how important Birtwell s textile patterns were to the success of his designs even featuring her name on his garment labels The label inside the black and white dress pictured here reads Ossie Clark Made in London Print by Celia Birtwell 2008 923 1A This dress and a coordinating Ossie Clark maxi coat were purchased by the donor s mother for the donor to wear to the Grammy Awards Though the donor wasn t sure of the exact date she thought the ensemble was purchased in 1969 We weren t able to find an image confirming the exact date of this black and white dress but we did unearth a 1970 video clip featuring a very similar Ossie Clark dress Clark probably produced more than one version of this style with each version incorporating different colors or patterns The severity of the coordinating coat acts as a counterbalance to the playful graphic patterning seen on the dress Tailored coats and jackets were an important part of Clark s design vocabulary a complement to his romantic dresses This coat is inspired by the redingote a heavy coat worn by men for traveling or riding during the 18th century Near the end of the 18th century a modified redingote appeared as womenswear Redingote style gowns were worn off and on throughout the 19th century reemerging as women s outerwear late in the

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2012/11/ossie-clark-ensemble-c-1969.html (2016-02-12)
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