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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Twiggy
    last forever To capitalize on her stature Twiggy apparently at the suggestion of her father started Twiggy Enterprises which licensed her image to numerous manufacturers Though a clothing line designed by Twiggy was a financial flop Twiggy merchandise was lucrative False eye lashes notebooks pens paper dolls lunch boxes wigs dress up kits and hosiery are only some of the Twiggy licensed items marketed to her fans in 1967 68 Twiggy tights Trimfit 1967 Gift of Stephanie Kline Morehouse 2004 148 5 On the packaging insert photo you can see Twiggy s trademark under eye makeup Twiggy licensed products capitalized on her image but she probably had no input in the design process Twiggy mini purse Mattel 1967 Gift of Kevin Jones 2006 155 1A F Mattel maker of Barbie also manufactured a Twiggy doll The doll was 11 tall made of bendable plastic and was marketed along with a full wardrobe Along with the Twiggy doll Mattel manufactured this child s purse and a Twiggy Fashion Tote bag Twiggy received royalty payments for individual products as well as a lump sum payment from each manufacturer who marketed her image The success of her merchandising allowed Twiggy to retire in 1969 just two short years after her entrance onto the 1960s scene During this brief window her face became an icon of 1960s fashion and culture Did Twiggy s canny marketing of her image help her maintain her iconic stature Without these products would we still remember her as the Face of 66 1Twiggy editorial Vogue 15 March 1967 63 Dougherty Phillip H Advertising Twiggy It s Only a Beginning New York Times 3 Sept 1967 107 Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post I found that

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2009/11/twiggy-.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: RIPPED: Expressions from the Underground is open to the public
    and related ephemera from the punk post punk and indie rock eras Curated by Cesar Padilla artist musician collector and punk rock enthusiast RIPPED is based on Padilla s 2010 book Ripped T shirts from the Underground In the November 2012 issue of our newsletter Cesar Padilla discusses how and why he began collecting T shirts RIPPED Expressions from the Underground is open until December 22 2012 This FREE exhibition is open Tuesday through Saturday 10am 5pm Follow RIPPED on Facebook for regular exhibition updates Photos by plasticgod Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post Verify your Comment Previewing your Comment Posted by This is only a preview Your comment has not yet been posted Your comment could not be posted Error type Your comment has been saved Comments are moderated and will not appear until approved by the author Post another comment The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image Please try again As a final step before posting your comment enter the letters and numbers you see in the image below This prevents automated programs from posting comments Having trouble reading this

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2012/11/ripped-expressions-from-the-underground-is-open-to-the-public.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: The Costume Cafe Podcast
    Collection You re in luck The Costume Cafe s Colleen Marie Monroe recently interviewed FIDM Museum Curator Kevin Jones about this outstanding collection Their conversation covered a range of topics including the origins of Helen Larson s collection her collecting methodology and a discussion of collection highlights You can listen to their conversation via The Costume Cafe s podcast page Hope you enjoy this look into The Helen Larson Historic Fashion Collection Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post Verify your Comment Previewing your Comment Posted by This is only a preview Your comment has not yet been posted Your comment could not be posted Error type Your comment has been saved Comments are moderated and will not appear until approved by the author Post another comment The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image Please try again As a final step before posting your comment enter the letters and numbers you see in the image below This prevents automated programs from posting comments Having trouble reading this image View an alternate Post a comment Comments are moderated and will not appear until the

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2012/11/the-costume-cafe-podcast.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: From the Archives: Quilted petticoat, c. 1840-45
    quilting with elaborate scenes featuring animals or intricate geometric patterns The pale pink quilted petticoat seen in Joshua Reynolds c c 1762 c 1764 painting of Miss Nelly O Brien features a simple diamond pattern Our quilted petticoat is quilted in a cross hatch motif on the upper portion with a wave pattern at the lower hem The wave pattern is visible in the detail shot below Detail of 2003 795 12 The bright color and busy pattern of the cotton textile identifies this petticoat as being from the 19th rather than the 18th century The dense patterning of multicolored stripes and serpentine lines of polka dots is typical of printed cottons from the 1840s It was produced by roller printing a process developed in the late 18th century In roller printing a metal cylinder is engraved with the desired pattern and rolled over the fabric This process allowed for very small scale detailed and intricate textile designs If required additional imagery could be block printed by hand over the roller printed pattern Interior of 2003 795 12 This view clearly demonstrates the quilt like structure of this petticoat The maker even used a variety of fabrics in the lining creating something akin to a patchwork quilt In a pinch a 19th century woman could have used this as a bed covering As the weather turns colder a wearing quilt sounds very appealing Additional reading Baumgarten Linda What Clothes Reveal The Language of Clothing in Colonial and Federal America Williamsburg VA The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation 2002 Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post What a lovely quilted petticoat I m attempted to recreate my own for the years 1861 1865 Can you tell me if the petticoat

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2012/11/from-the-archives-quilted-petticoat-c-1840-45.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Crinoline silhouette
    with a band around the arm The trim seen on the sleeves and bodice is self fabric ruching Back view of 83 530 1AB Because they were relatively easy to manufacture and inexpensive cage crinolines were worn by women of all classes and ages A fashion fixture throughout the late 1850s and 1860s they remained popular until the late 1860s Humorists and even some fashion writers fixated on the cage crinoline as an item of satire because it made sitting passing through doorways and many other activities unnecessarily difficult On January 3 1857 the New York Times noted that crinolines thrive on caricature Windy days were particularly dangerous as lightweight cage crinolines could sometimes be blown upwards To protect themselves from this immodesty many women wore an additional petticoat over or under their cage crinoline This also softened the line of the steel hoops and provided additional warmth In some situations not even an additional petticoat could protect the wearer s modesty In the humorous stereoscope card seen below a woman has caught the tapes of her crinoline on a fencepost Titled Crinoline Difficulties it pokes gentle fun at fashionable foibles Crinoline Difficulties stereoscope card c 1857 Purchase 2004 5 86 Ashelford Jane The Art of Dress Clothes and Society 1500 1914 Abrams New York 1996 Severa Joan Dressed for the Photographer Ordinary Americans and Fashion 1840 1900 Kent State University Press Ohio 1995 Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post I did a research paper at Ryerson University on the cage crinoline this summer and learned that the crinoline was the first garment worn by all classes of women The relatively inexpensive price made it accessible to all and in spite of the inherent dangers of wearing a large skirt that could potentially be caught in a machine or catch on fire from an open flame it was incredibly popular even among working class women I also find the shape of the crinoline inherently beautiful as a sculptural object and this inspired my recent art work Posted by Ingrid Mida November 19 2009 at 03 55 PM My research resulted in the same findings that you mention in your comment Ingrid According to the Jane Ashelford book I listed as one of the sources even after crinolines went out of fashion about 1868 servants were often expected to wear crinolines as part of their uniform Sounds like it would make household tasks very difficult to complete Posted by FIDM Museum November 23 2009 at 06 58 AM The Art of Dress referenced by Rachel is by JANE Ashelford not Joan Ashelford rdunlap tsf net Posted by Ruth Dunlap July 03 2010 at 09 31 PM Thank you for the correction Ruth You ll notice I ve changed the citation in the entry Posted by FIDM Museum July 04 2010 at 12 00 PM Note also in the side view that quite a substantial baby bump could

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2009/11/crinoline-silhouette.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Event: Monarchy Lecture & Royal Tea
    Historic Fashion Collection The presentation will include a 1761 court bodice worn to the coronation of King George III Princess Charlotte of Wales 1816 17 gown an investigation of the provenance of gowns worn by Queen Victoria and insight into Helen Larson s collecting practices Ticket purchase includes tea and a selection of exquisite savories and sweets Tickets for this event are 50 per person To purchase tickets please visit the FIDM Museum Shop Seating at this event is limited The Monarchy Lecture Royal Tea will be held at the FIDM Orange County campus 17590 Gillette Avenue Irvine CA 92614 5610 Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post Verify your Comment Previewing your Comment Posted by This is only a preview Your comment has not yet been posted Your comment could not be posted Error type Your comment has been saved Comments are moderated and will not appear until approved by the author Post another comment The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image Please try again As a final step before posting your comment enter the letters and numbers you see in the

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2012/10/event-monarchy-lecture-royal-tea.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: From the Archives: Fancy dress costume, 1883-87
    could afford it even couturiers such as Worth and Poiret designed fancy dress costumes for their clients Our gypsy dress bears a tag reading Swan Edgar a London department store As does Halloween today 19th century fancy dress allowed individuals to dress and act outside the normal bounds of propriety Aristocrats dressed as peasants and the poor dressed as royalty while both groups probably displayed more skin than usual Though the wearer of Swan Edgar s fancy dress definitely covered her legs with stockings the length still exposes much more of the body than was commonly acceptable in the 1880s While the opportunity to relax social norms was part of the appeal of fancy dress it was also considered somewhat dangerous For this reason fancy dress costumes never included masks or face coverings Masking or masquerades allowed participants too much license and were thought to result in lewd behavior A December 24 1869 New York Times article titled The Masked Ball Orgies at the French Theatre outlined the dangers of masking At this masked ball revelers were so out of control they deliberately hurled one of the female dancers from the proscenium box to the floor beneath a distance of several feet The dancer suffered a broken thigh 2001 31 15AB Side View Though fancy dress was not meant to be worn as fashionable dress it often featured elements carried over from fashion From this side view you ll notice a prominent bustle a typical feature of 1880s fashion For the designer and wearer it was probably impossible to entirely separate the notion of fashion from the idea of costume 2001 31 15AB Hem Detail In this detail shot you can see the metal coil and coin trim Both were once silver but have now tarnished The coins are inscribed with what might be Arabic script 2001 31 15AB Back View If you re still wondering what to wear on Halloween check out this 1887 fancy dress manual Fancy Dress Described or what to wear at fancy balls This book went through multiple printings in the 1880s and 1890s and was extremely popular The fantastic site Archive org has scanned the entire book complete with images I recommend this costume Posted by FIDM Museum Permalink Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post This is an amazing piece of 19th century fancy dress beyond charming And a great little article too However I m curious where the designation of a gypsy themed costume comes from It just shouts Greco Roman inspired themed to me While saying it is highly stylised is a huge understatement the cascading folds of the underskirt the swagging of the overskirt to look like wet drapery the treatment of the cap sleeves and the colour palette of mostly white with silver and pale blue strike me as entirely classical in derivation the tiny silver Arabic coins that would not be noticed as such from any distance notwithstanding Of course

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2012/10/from-the-archives-fancy-dress-costume-1883-87.html (2016-02-12)
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  • FIDM Museum Blog: Political T-shirts
    for the highest political office in the United States After a close race President Bush was reelected for a second term Another political T shirt in our collection takes a more tongue in cheek approach to politics Jane Fonda never ran for president but she did become deeply involved in political activism during the 1960s and 1970s Having starred in numerous films during the 1960s Fonda was a well known actress Her biggest hit of the decade was the science fiction send up Barbarella 1968 Because of her public persona Fonda s support of left leaning political causes was often controversial In addition to her support of civil rights and feminist causes Fonda was a vocal anti war activist Her 1972 trip to North Vietnam and the widely circulated image of Fonda sitting on an anti aircraft gun and surrounded by North Vietnamese soldiers still generates resentment despite Fonda s public apologies for certain aspects of her trip In 1982 Fonda released Jane Fonda s Workout the first in a series of wildly popular exercise videos Nineteen eighties fashions emphasized the body and fashion catered to the aerobics sculpted bodies of fashion trendsetters 1 Azzedine Alaia s clinging fashions are emblematic of the era Jane Fonda s workout videos were a popular expression of the widespread interest in physical perfection Accessible to anyone with a VCR they allowed women to work out in the privacy of their own home Our Jane Fonda for President T shirt is probably a reference to this era of her career During the 1960s 70s promoting Jane Fonda for president would have been a radical suggestion By the 1980s the popularity of Fonda s workout videos had softened her reputation For those who knew Fonda primarily as a fitness guru a vote for Jane Fonda

    Original URL path: http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2012/10/political-t-shirts.html (2016-02-12)
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