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  • First Peoples: Massacre at Camp Grant
    construction of memory surrounding the event Elevates the event to the level of academic discussion where it rightly belongs Western Historical Quarterly Winner of a 2009 National Council on Public History Book Award National Council on Public History to the U S Army at Camp Grant near Tucson Arizona Thirty or more Apache children were stolen and either kept in Tucson homes or sold into slavery in Mexico Planned and perpetrated by some of the most prominent men in Arizona s territorial era this organized slaughter has become a kind of phantom history lurking beneath the Southwest s official history strangely present and absent at the same time Seeking to uncover the mislaid past this powerful book begins by listening to those voices in the historical record that have long been silenced and disregarded Massacre at Camp Grant fashions a multivocal narrative interweaving the documentary record Apache narratives historical texts and ethnographic research to provide new insights into the atrocity Thus drawing from a range of sources it demonstrates the ways in which painful histories continue to live on in the collective memories of the communities in which they occurred Chip Colwell Chanthaphonh begins with the premise that every account

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1014 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Matrons and Maids
    local Tucson community and the national administration the Office of Indian Affairs Based on federal archival records Matrons and Maids offers an original and detailed account of government practices and efforts to regulate American Indian women Haskins demonstrates that the outing system was clearly about regulating cross cultural interactions and she highlights the roles played by white women in this history As she compellingly argues we cannot fully engage with

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1140 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Maya Ethnolinguistic Identity
    since the end of the colonial period French interrogates the Guatemalan indigenous binary In Guatemala Ladino refers to the Spanish speaking minority of the population who are of mixed European usually Spanish and indigenous ancestry Indian is understood to mean the majority of Guatemala s population who speak one of the twenty one languages in the Maya linguistic groups of the country although levels of bilingualism are very high among most Maya communities As French shows the Guatemalan state has actively promoted a racialized essentialized notion of Indians as an undifferentiated inherently inferior group that has stood stubbornly in the way of national progress unity and development which are implicitly the goals of true Guatemalans that is Ladinos French shows with useful examples how constructions of language and collective identity are in fact strategies undertaken to serve the goals of institutions including the government the military the educational system and the church and social actors including linguists scholars and activists But by incorporating in depth fieldwork with groups that speak Kaqchikel and K iche along with analyses of Spanish language discourses Maya Ethnolinguistic Identity also shows how some individuals in urban bilingual Indian communities have disrupted the essentializing projects of

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1009 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Medicine Trail
    the remarkable life story of one of its most beloved matriarchs 100 year old medicine woman Gladys Tantaquidgeon Medicine Trail tells of the Mohegans survival into this century Blending autobiography and history with traditional knowledge and ways of life Medicine Trail presents a collage of events in Tantaquidgeon s life We see her childhood spent learning Mohegan ceremonies and healing methods at the hands of her tribal grandmothers and her Ivy League education and career in the white male dominated field of anthropology We also witness her travels to other Indian communities acting as both an ambassador of her own tribe and an employee of the federal government s Bureau of Indian Affairs Finally we see Tantaquidgeon s return to her beloved Mohegan Hill where she cofounded America s oldest Indian run museum carrying on her life s commitment to good medicine and the cultural continuance and renewal of all Indian nations Written in the Mohegan oral tradition this book offers a unique insider s understanding of Mohegan and other Native American cultures while discussing the major policies and trends that have affected people throughout Indian Country in the twentieth century A significant departure from traditional anthropological as told to

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1026 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Memories of Conquest
    Americas What did these Indian conquistadors expect from the partnership and what were the implications of their involvement in Spains New World empire Laura Matthew s study of Ciudad Vieja Guatemala the study first to focus on a single allied colony over the entire colonial period places the Nahua Zapotec and Mixtec conquistadors of Guatemala and their descendants within a deeply Mesoamerican historical context Drawing on archives ethnography and colonial Mesoamerican maps Matthew argues that the conquest cannot be fully understood without considering how these Indian conquistadors first invaded and then of their own accord and largely by their own rules settled in Central America Shaped by pre Columbian patterns of empire alliance warfare and migration the members of this diverse indigenous community became unified as the Mexicanos descendants of Indian conquistadors in their adopted homeland Their identity and higher status in Guatemalan society derived from their continued pride in their heritage says Matthew but also depended on Spanish colonialism s willingness to honor them Throughout Memories of Conquest Matthew charts the power of colonialism to reshape and restrict Mesoamerican society even for those most favored by colonial policy and despite powerful continuities in Mesoamerican culture About Laura E Matthew

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1115 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Mining, the Environment, and Indigenous Development Conflicts
    development and indigenous peoples continue to challenge policy makers This book gets to the heart of resource conflicts and environmental impact assessment by asking why indigenous communities support environmental causes in some cases of mining development but not in others Saleem Ali examines environmental conflicts between mining companies and indigenous communities and with rare objectivity offers a comparative study of the factors leading to those conflicts Mining the Environment and Indigenous Development Conflicts presents four cases from the United States and Canada the Navajos and Hopis with Peabody Coal in Arizona the Chippewas with the Crandon Mine proposal in Wisconsin the Chipewyan Inuits Dene and Cree with Cameco in Saskatchewan and the Innu and Inuits with Inco in Labrador These cases exemplify different historical relationships with government and industry and provide an instance of high and low levels of Native resistance in each country Through these cases Ali analyzes why and under what circumstances tribes agree to negotiated mining agreements on their lands and why some negotiations are successful and others not Ali challenges conventional theories of conflict based on economic or environmental cost benefit analysis which do not fully capture the dynamics of resistance He proposes that the underlying

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1005 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Mobilizing Bolivia's Displaced
    the Americas a watershed victory for social activists and Native peoples A beautifully written book about citizenship that is an ethnography of globalization as well as a sharp contribution to debates about indigeneity Andrew Canessa University of Essex El Movimiento Sin Tierra MST or the Landless Peasant Movement played a significant role in bringing Morales to power Following in the tradition of the well known Brazilian Landless movement Bolivias MST activists seized unproductive land and built farming collectives as a means of resistance to large scale export oriented agriculture In Mobilizing Bolivias Displaced Nicole Fabricant illustrates how landless peasants politicized indigeneity to shape grassroots land politics reform the state and secure human and cultural rights for Native peoples Fabricant takes readers into the personal spaces of home and work on long bus rides and into meetings and newly built MST settlements to show how in response to displacement Indigenous identity is becoming ever more dynamic and adaptive In addition to advancing this rich definition of indigeneity she explores the ways in which Morales has found himself at odds with Indigenous activists and in so doing shows that Indigenous people have a far more complex relationship to Morales than is generally

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1145 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Native American Language Ideologies
    of the processes of language shift and language death This volume samples the language ideologies of a wide range of Native American communities from the Canadian Yukon to Guatemal to show their role in sociocultural transformation These studies take up such active issues as insiderness in Cherokee language ideologies contradictions of space time for the Northern Arapaho language socialization and Paiute identity and orthography choices and language renewal among the Kiowa The authors including members of indigenous speech communities who participate in language renewal efforts discuss not only Native Americans conscious language ideologies but also the often revealing relationship between these beliefs and other more implicit realizations of language use as embedded in community practice The chapters discuss the impact of contemporary language issues related to grammar language use the relation between language and social identity and emergent language ideologies themselves in Native American speech communities And although they portray obvious variation in attitudes toward language across communities they also reveal commonalities notably the emergent ideological process of iconization between a language and various national ethnic and tribal identities As fewer Native Americans continue to speak their own language this timely volume provides valuable grounded studies of language ideologies inaction

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1082 (2016-02-09)
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