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  • First Peoples: A New Deal for Native Art
    them to favor pre industrial forms rather than art that responded to contemporary markets In A New Deal for Native Art Jennifer McLerran reveals how positioning the native artist as a pre modern Other served the goals of New Deal programs and how this sometimes worked at cross purposes with promoting native self sufficiency She describes federal policies of the 1930s and early 1940s that sought to generate an upscale market for Native American arts and crafts And by unraveling the complex ways in which commodification was negotiated and the roles that producers consumers and New Deal administrators played in that process she sheds new light on native art s commodity status and the artist s position as colonial subject In this first book to address the ways in which New Deal Indian policy specifically advanced commodification and colonization McLerran reviews its multi pronged effort to improve the market for Indian art through the Indian Arts and Crafts Board arts and crafts cooperatives murals museum exhibits and Civilian Conservation Corps projects Presenting nationwide case studies that demonstrate transcultural dynamics of production and reception she argues for viewing Indian art as a commodity as part of the national economy and as

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1002 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: The New Politics of Protest
    have occurred in Latin America Comparing cases in Ecuador Peru Bolivia and Chile this book details the emergence of Indigenous movements under and against Neoliberal governments Rice uses original field research and interviews with Indigenous leaders to examine long term patterns of Indigenous political activism and overturn accepted theories on the role of the Indian in democracy A useful and engaging study The New Politics of Protest seeks to determine

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1125 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: The Northwest Salmon Crisis
    Northwest A remarkable collection of relevant revealing public documents that chronicle the sad saga of declining salmon runs in the region Russell Sadler syndicated columnist A valuable resource for policy makers scientists historians students and all who care about the future of salmon Environmental Law The Northwest Salmon Crisis is a book that can help us understand the origins of a deep rooted problem one that applies to every small drainage in our region Jack Nisbet The Pacific Northwest Inlander The history of the current salmon crisis is long and disturbingly consistent with concern over declining salmon runs beginning in the 1800s This book focuses on the human actions and failures to act that have helped drive many wild salmon stocks in the Pacific Northwest to the brink of extinction For this first documentary history of the salmon crisis knowledgeable observers of salmon history have chosen and commented upon the documents that they feel most clearly reveal the causes and implications of today s crisis The eighty documents span a period of 140 years and address such issues as habitat hatcheries dams fisheries Indian fishing rights and watershed management Together these mileposts in the sorry journey of the salmon provide

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1073 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Once Were Pacific
    how and when M ori and other Pacific peoples articulate their ancestral history as migratory seafarers drawing their identity not only from land but also from water Although M ori are ethnically Polynesian and Aotearoa New Zealand is clearly a part of the Pacific region in New Zealand the terms M ori and Pacific are colloquially applied to two distinct communities M ori are Indigenous and Pacific refers to migrant

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1129 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Oregon Indians
    an important part of Oregon history The Oregonian Indians tell their own story From first encounters in the late eighteenth century to modern tribal economies this volume presents first person accounts of events threatening changing and shaping the lives of Oregon Indians The book s seven thematic sections are arranged chronologically and prefaced with introductory essays that provide the context of Indian relations with Euro Americans and tightening federal policy Each of the nearly seventy documents has a brief introduction that identifies the event and the speakers involved Most of the book s selections are little known Few have been previously published including treaty council minutes court and congressional testimonies letters and passages from travelers journals Oregon Indians opens with the arrival of Euro Americans and their introduction of new technology weapons and diseases The role of treaties machinations of the Oregon volunteers efforts of the U S Army to protect the Indians but also to subdue and confine them and the emergence of reservation programs to civilize them are recorded in a variety of documents that illuminate nineteenth century Indian experiences Twentieth century documents include Tommy Thompson on the flooding of the Celilo Falls fishing grounds in 1942 as

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1074 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Oregon and the Collapse of Illahee
    of Illahee redresses such absence and oversight powerfully exhibiting the centrality of Chinook and confederated Oregon Indian tribes to the making of the region s settler societies Readers may be particularly interested in the sobering chapters on the brutal wars of the 1850s and by the book s wonderfully rendered conclusion An important study of long neglected subjects that should be essential reading in as well as out of the region Ned Blackhawk Yale University Gray H Whaley s impressive and ambitious study of the U S presence in the Lower Columbia River region and the impact of that colonialism on the Indians living there firmly places the Pacific Northwest into the broader story of U S empire With great skill the author considers the role of merchants missionaries settlers and diverse Indian communities over a period of sixty years of profound change showing how westward expansion was part of a larger imperial project Evan Lampe www common place org In this sound analysis of Indian white relations in Oregon the author clearly presents the significant regional issues and effectively integrates them into the broad national patterns Roger L Nichols University of Arizona author of Natives and Strangers A History of Ethnic Americans newcomers and between newcomers and Native peoples focusing on political sovereignty religion trade sexuality and the land from initial encounters to Oregon s statehood He emphasizes Native perspectives using the Chinook word Illahee homeland to refer to the indigenous world he examines Whaley argues that the process of Oregon s founding is best understood as a contest between the British empire and a nascent American one with Oregon s Native people and their lands at the heart of the conflict He identifies race republicanism liberal economics and violence as the key ideological and practical components of American

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1048 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Our Fire Survives the Storm
    his theories but for the passionate compelling prose with which he delivered them Justice s passages about Nanye hi Nancy Ward and Tsiyu Gansini Dragging Canoe are good examples of this In terms of Justices articulating the dichotomy between the Chicamaugua War Chief tradition and the Beloved Path Peace Chief tradition the portraits of Tsiyu and Nanye hi are crucial The stories of these two important Cherokee historical figures are compelling and Justice s prose brings the story to life Our Fire Survives the Storm is a good book valuable for both libraries and classrooms Great Plains Quarterly This book is a good resource for students educators writers and those interested in Cherokee culture News From Indian Country centuries after the Trail of Tears and a hundred years after the allotment of Indian Territory In Our Fire Survives the Storm Daniel Heath Justice traces the expression of Cherokee identity in that nation s literary tradition Through cycles of war and peace resistance and assimilation trauma and regeneration Cherokees have long debated what it means to be Cherokee through protest writings memoirs fiction and retellings of traditional stories Justice employs the Chickamauga consciousness of resistance and Beloved Path of engagement theoretical

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1037 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Peace Came in the Form of a Woman
    first to show how really essential gender is to contact studies William and Mary Quarterly A highly valuable contribution to the indigenous historiography of the southwestern borderlands in the early period of European contact Journal of Southern History Engaging and beautifully written Provides vivid accounts of Indian power and the gendered ways it was expressed Western Historical Quarterly Rich complex and detailed A well crafted and thoughtful work that does much to alter the landscape of American history Signs Transforming enemies into allies took decades and Barr offers a way to begin revising and rethinking the literature on these encounters The Journal of American History accommodate resist and persevere She demonstrates that between the 1690s and 1780s Indian peoples including Caddos Apaches Payayas Karankawas Wichitas and Comanches formed relationships with Spaniards in Texas that refuted European claims of imperial control Barr argues that Indians not only retained control over their territories but also imposed control over Spaniards Instead of being defined in racial terms as was often the case with European constructions of power diplomatic relations between the Indians and Spaniards in the region were dictated by Indian expressions of power grounded in gendered terms of kinship By examining six

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1061 (2016-02-09)
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