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  • First Peoples: The People Have Never Stopped Dancing
    meet knowledge and imaginations while stories of this generation ensure our future Marrie Mumford Canada Research Chair Aboriginal Arts and Literature Trent University Murphy does a fine job of challenging stereotypes about American Indian dance and offers the reader new ways to think about the agency of Native dancers bodies on stage Studies in American Indian Literatures This text puts a whole new slant on the history of modern dance in America and for this reason is a wonderful contribution to dance scholarship and essential reading The Drama Review Winner of the 2008 de la Torre Bueno Prize for Outstanding Book of the Year and a Choice Outstanding Academic Title de la Torre Bueno dance Jacqueline Shea Murphy shows how these performances are at once diverse and connected by common influences Demonstrating the complex relationship between Native and modern dance choreography Shea Murphy delves first into U S and Canadian federal policies toward Native performance from the late nineteenth through the early twentieth centuries revealing the ways in which government sought to curtail ceremonial dancing while actually encouraging staged spectacles such as those in Buffalo Bill s Wild West shows She then engages the innovative work of Ted Shawn Lester

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1041 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: The Peoples and the Word
    historical recovery insightful analysis rythmic prose and compassionate sensibility forcefully solidify the significant presence of a Native nonfiction tradition firmly anchored within the real experiences of real people MELUS primary form used by American Indians in developing a relationship with the written word one that reaches back much further in Native history and culture Focusing on autobiographical writings and critical essays as well as communally authored and political documents The People and the Word explores how the Native tradition of nonfiction has both encompassed and dissected Native experiences Warrior begins by tracing a history of American Indian writing from the eighteenth century to the late twentieth century then considers four particular moments Pequot intellectual William Apess s autobiographical writings from the 1820s and 1830s the Osage Constitution of 1881 narratives from American Indian student experiences including accounts of boarding school in the late 1880s and modern Kiowa writer N Scott Momaday s essay The Man Made of Words penned during the politically charged 1970s Warrior s discussion of Apess s work looks unflinchingly at his unconventional life and death he recognizes resistance to assimilation in the products of the student print shop at the Santee Normal Training School and in

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1042 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Queer Indigenous Studies
    bold opening to Queer Indigenous Studies invites new dialogues in Native American and Indigenous studies about the directions and implications of queer Indigenous studies The collection notably engages Indigenous GLBTQ2 movements as alliances that also call for allies beyond their bounds which the co editors and contributors model by crossing their varied identities including Native trans straight non Native feminist Two Spirit mixed blood and queer to name just a few Rooted in the Indigenous Americas and the Pacific and drawing on disciplines ranging from literature to anthropology contributors to Queer Indigenous Studies call Indigenous GLBTQ2 movements and allies to center an analysis that critiques the relationship between colonialism and heteropatriarchy By answering critical turns in Indigenous scholarship that center Indigenous epistemologies and methodologies contributors join in reshaping Native studies queer studies transgender studies and Indigenous feminisms Based on the reality that queer Indigenous people experience multilayered oppression that profoundly impacts our safety health and survival this book is at once an imagining and an invitation to the reader to join in the discussion of decolonizing queer Indigenous research and theory and by doing so to partake in allied resistance working toward positive change About Qwo Li Driskill Qwo Li Driskill is a Cherokee Queer Two Spirit writer scholar and performer S he is the author of Walking with Ghosts Poems and is currently and assistant professor in the Department of English at Texas A M University About Chris Finley Chris Finley is a queer Native feminist finishing her PhD in American culture at the University of Michigan She is a member of the Colville Confederated Tribes located in Washington State About Brian Joseph Gilley Brian Joseph Gilley is an associate professor of anthropology and director of the First Nations Education and Culture Center at Indiana University Bloomington He is

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1101 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Race and Science
    the law Race and Which word apart from race could bring natural scientists social scientists legal scholars and humanists together to debate everything from the historical origins of the concept to its future prospects in the light of genomics from its function as a political ploy to its inspiration for legal minds in devising racial purity laws as well as legislating desegregation This excellent interdisciplinary collection of essays illuminates race in all its facets and in fascinating case studies from the United States Europe and the plant world Werner Sollors Professor of Literature and African and African American Studies Harvard University Science collects essays from leading voices in law history history of science botany and the social sciences resulting in a rich and comprehensive multidisciplinary exploration of the roots of and the scientific challenges to racial essentialism The notion that someone s racial identity and characteristics define everything of importance about them has become deeply embedded in American culture society and science These essays illuminate the roots of this belief and present case studies that explore how and why natural and social scientists have challenged these racist views About Paul Farber Paul Farber is OSU Distinguished Professor of History of

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1064 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Rebuilding Native Nations
    attention from scholars in the fields of Native and indigenous studies as well as those interested in the sovereignty efforts and expressions of dependent domestic nations undertaking or continuing the project of nation building Julie Pelletier American Indian Quarterly 33 4 Fall 2009 states and Prairie Provinces to southwestern deserts from Mississippi and Oklahoma to the northwest coast of the continent Native peoples are reclaiming their right to govern themselves and to shape their future in their own ways Challenging more than a century of colonial controls they are addressing severe social problems building sustainable economies and reinvigorating Indigenous cultures In effect they are rebuilding their nations according to their own diverse and often innovative designs Produced by the Native Nations Institute for Leadership Management and Policy at the University of Arizona and the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development this book traces the contours of that revolution as Native nations turn the dream of self determination into a practical reality Part report part analysis part how to manual for Native leaders it discusses strategies for governance and community and economic development being employed by American Indian nations and First Nations in Canada as they move to assert greater

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1016 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Reclaiming Dine History
    standards of a fine history that reveals to the reader much about Navajo history that has largely been missed A fascinating page turner that should be on the must read list of anyone interested in the history of the American Southwest Journal of Arizona History Denetdale is the great great great granddaughter of a well known Navajo chief Manuelito 1816 1894 and his nearly unknown wife Juanita 1845 1910 Stimulated in part by seeing photographs of these ancestors she began to explore her family history as a way of examining broader issues in Navajo historiography Here she presents a thought provoking examination of the construction of the history of the Navajo people Dine in the Navajo language that underlines the dichotomy between Navajo and non Navajo perspectives on the Dine past Reclaiming Dine History has two primary objectives First Denetdale interrogates histories that privilege Manuelito and marginalize Juanita in order to demonstrate some of the ways that writing about the Dine has been biased by non Navajo views of assimilation and gender Second she reveals how Navajo narratives including oral histories and stories kept by matrilineal clans serve as vehicles to convey Navajo beliefs and values By scrutinizing stories about

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1017 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Recognition, Sovereignty Struggles, and Indigenous Rights in the United States
    anthropologists legal scholars and political scientists the essays cover the history of recognition focus on recent legal and cultural processes and examine contemporary recognition struggles nationwide Contributors are Joanne Barker Lenape Kathleen A Brown Perez Brothertown Rosemary Cambra Muwekma Ohlone Amy E Den Ouden Timothy Q Evans Haliwa Saponi Les W Field Angela A Gonzales Hopi Rae Gould Nipmuc J Kehaulani Kauanui Kanaka Maoli K Alexa Koenig Alan Leventhal Malinda

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1154 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: The Red Land to the South
    whose work demonstrates a surprisingly assertive literary politics in the era By contextualizing this group of American Indian authors in the work of their contemporaries Cox reveals how the literary history of this period is far more rich and nuanced than is generally acknowledged The writers he focuses on Todd Downing Choctaw Lynn Riggs Cherokee and D Arcy McNickle Confederated Salish and Kootenai are shown to be on par with

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1135 (2016-02-09)
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