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  • First Peoples: Red Medicine
    Marmon Silko book explores Indigenous medicine across North America with a special emphasis on how Indigenous knowledge has endured and persisted among peoples with a legacy to Mexico Gonzales combines her lived experience in Red Medicine as an herbalist and traditional birth attendant with in depth research into oral traditions storytelling and the meanings of symbols to uncover how Indigenous knowledge endures over time And she shows how this knowledge is now being reclaimed by Chicanos Mexican Americans and Mexican Indigenous peoples For Gonzales a central guiding force in Red Medicine is the principal of regeneration as it is manifested in Spiderwoman Dating to Pre Columbian times the Mesoamerican Weaver Spiderwoman the guardian of birth medicine and purification rites such as the Nahua sweat bath exemplifies the interconnected process of rebalancing that transpires throughout life in mental spiritual and physical manifestations Gonzales also explains how dreaming is a form of diagnosing in traditional Indigenous medicine and how Indigenous concepts of the body provide insight into healing various kinds of trauma Gonzales links pre Columbian thought to contemporary healing practices by examining ancient symbols and their relation to current curative knowledges among Indigenous peoples Red Medicine suggests that Indigenous healing systems

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1119 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Red on Red
    of tribal based criticism is brilliant MultiCultural Review The struggle of Native scholars to develop a distinctly Native literary criticism one that draws from tribal histories stories and traditions rather than accepting Eurocentric and often racist standards of critical and artistic sophistication has seen varied degrees of success since the late 1970s Now at the edge of the colonizers millennium easily one of the most nuanced respectful and penetrating examples of such scholarship has appeared in Craig Womack s Red on Red Native American Literary Separatism This study is a welcome corrective to the too common insistence among many scholars in Native American literatures that there is still an all encompassing pan Indian understanding of Native texts and cultural expressions Womack distinguishes himself as above all else a sophisticated Creek scholar Yet those of us from other Native traditions will find the book equally indispensable in its offering of a clear blueprint for writing about expressing and continuing our own histories and world views Womack advocates not only a Native centered understanding of Native literatures but also a reevaluation of the entire concept of the American literary canon centering that discussion in Indian Country Red on Red stands as a powerful evocative example of such a criticism and is vital reading for anyone Indian and non Indian alike who seeks to better understand the literatures of America Great Plains Quarterly criticism It can t That is Craig Womack s argument in Red on Red Indian communities have their own intellectual and cultural traditions that are well equipped to analyze Native literary production These traditions should be the eyes through which the texts are viewed To analyze a Native text with the methods currently dominant in the academy according to the author is like studying the stars with a magnifying glass

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1038 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Reflections in Place
    feminist studies educational anthropology multicultural education ethnic studies American Indian studies and qualitative ethnographic research Overall a beautiful account powerfully told Teresa L McCarty author of A Place to Be Navajo Rough Rock and the Struggle for Self Determination in Indigenous Schooling of sources Deyhle illuminates the devastating cultural consequences of racial stereotyping in the context of education Longstanding racial tension in southeastern Utah frames this cross generational set of portraits that together depict all aspects of this specifically American Indian struggle Deyhle cites the lefthanded compliment Navajos work well with their hands which she indicates represents the limiting and all too common appraisal of American Indian learning potential that she vehemently disputes and seeks to disprove As a recognized authority on the subject qualified by multiple degrees in racial and American Indian studies Deyhle is able to chronicle the lives and survivance of three Navajo women in a way that is simultaneously ethnographic and moving Her critique of the U S education system s underlying yet very real tendency toward structural discrimination takes shape in elegant prose that moves freely into and out of time and place The combination of substantive sources and touching personal experience forms a profound

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1007 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Reimagining Indian Country
    in cities not on reservations or in rural areas Still scholars policymakers and popular culture often regard Indians first as reservation peoples living apart from non Native Americans In this book Nicolas Rosenthal reorients our understanding of the experience of American Indians by tracing their migration to cities exploring the formation of urban Indian communities and delving into the shifting relationships between reservations and urban areas from the early twentieth century to the present With a focus on Los Angeles which by 1970 had more Native American inhabitants than any place outside the Navajo reservation ReImagining Indian Country shows how cities have played a defining role in modern American Indian life and examines the evolution of Native American identity in recent decades Rosenthal emphasizes the lived experiences of Native migrants in realms including education labor health housing and social and political activism to understand how they adapted to an urban environment and to consider how they formed and continue to form new identities Though still connected to the places where indigenous peoples have preserved their culture Rosenthal argues that Indian identity must be understood as dynamic and fully enmeshed in modern global networks About Nicolas G Rosenthal Nicolas G Rosenthal

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1116 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Reimagining Marginalized Foods
    and what cultural significance it has This volume brings together ethnographically based anthropological analyses of shifting meanings and representations associated with the foods ingredients and cooking practices that of marginalized and or indigenous cultures Contributors are particularly interested in how these foods intersect with politics nationhood and governance identity authenticity and conservation The chapters cover diverse locales issues and foods the cultural meanings of sinonggi a thick sago porridge from Sulawesi Indonesia the significance of pom a Surinam dish popular in the Netherlands the transformation of alpaca meat in Peru the impact of culinary tourism on indigenous cuisine in Mexico the re presenting of minor millets in South India and the development of cheeses in the Italian Alps A conceptual essay on food and social boundaries rounds out the collection Throughout the contributors address important questions including How are traditional foods repackaged in the process of mainstreaming access What does this repackaging mean for the ways local or indigenous peoples view their traditional food practices How are local cuisines mobilized in movements to create national images and identities What tensions emerge between new representations of foods and local cultural meanings Together the contributors provide a thoughtful inquiry into what happens

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1126 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Reinventing the Lacandon
    lies on the border of Mexico and Guatemala was part of the largest tropical rain forest north of the Amazon The destruction of the Lacandon occurred with little attention from the international pres until January 1 1994 when a group of armed Maya rebels led by a charismatic spokesperson who called himself Subcomandante Marcos emerged from jungle communities and briefly occupied several towns in the Mexican state of Chiapas These rebels known as the Zapatista National Liberation Army became front page news around the globe and they used their notoriety to issue rhetorically powerful communiques that denounced political corruption the Mexican government s treatment of indigenous peoples and the negative impact of globalization As Brian Gollnick reveals the Zapatista communiques had deeper roots in the Mayan rain forest than Westerners realize and he points out that the very idea of the jungle is also deeply rooted though in different ways in the Western imagination Gollnick draws on theoretical innovations offered by subaltern studies to discover oral traces left by Indigenous inhabitants in dominant cultural productions He explores both how the jungle region and its inhabitants have been represented in literary writings from the time of the Spanish conquest to the

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1018 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Removable Type
    Explores how native peoples came to adopt a European weapon namely the printed word as both a means to defend themselves from the actions of the United States and as a way to preserve their culture Highly recommended Library Journal Painstakingly researched deeply conversant with the fields it will impact and engagingly argued and written Removable Type will be a landmark in early Native literary studies and in early American book history Round generates a set of scholarly questions that will keep people coming back to this book for a long while Robert Warrior author of The People and the Word Reading Native Nonfiction Round s important study demonstrates and confirms that Native Americans had an intellectual interest in European alphabetic literacy from very early in the colonial relationship Well researched and effectively presented Recommended Choice not in English but in Algonquian making it one of the first books printed in a Native language In this ambitious and multidisciplinary work Phillip Round examines the relationship between Native Americans and printed books over a two hundred year period uncovering the individual communal regional and political contexts for Native peoples use of the printed word From the northeastern woodlands to the Great

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1093 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Renewing Salmon Nation's Food Traditions
    are at its core but other culinary accents from Spanish to Japanese have added to the mix A project of the Renewing America s Food Traditions RAFT consortium this book describes over 180 species of local plants and animals many now at risk others recovering and all deserving of recognition that have formed the basis of food traditions in the Pacific Northwest To identify the traditional foods of Salmon Nation RAFT brought together farmers chefs fisherfolk food historians orchardists ethnobotanists conservation activists nutrition educators and wild foragers in an unprecedented effort to assess the current state of foods unique to the Pacific Northwest The result is for the first ever a comprehensive list of the foods that have nurtured the cultures of Salmon Nation over the centuries Renewing Salmon Nation s Food Traditions encourages readers and eaters to familiarize themselves with the rich histories ecologies and recipes of these local foods This beautifully illustrated handbook describes the appearance and taste of each species as well as its origin and history geographic range and culinary uses Foods on the list range from domesticated crops such as the Bing cherry Hood strawberry and Nez Perce bean to sea foods such as Chinook

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1075 (2016-02-09)
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