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  • First Peoples: A Return to Servitude
    to Mayas serving in the tourist meccas of the Yucatan where their ancestors built the temples and pyramids that draw people from all over the world As they refashion their lives in the playgrounds of transnational tourists she reveals how they are acquiring new notions of personhood and gender leaving behind the old markers of dress and language as they negotiate and sometimes resist neoliberal premises June Nash Emeritus Faculty The CUNY Graduate Center Weaving Avery Gordon s notion of haunting with theories of transnationalism and modernity M Bianet Castellanos argues that the cultural and material shifts that accompany Maya migration for work in Cancún s tourism industry enable negotiation accommodation and even resistance to Mexico s neoliberal reforms A Return to Servitude dismantles romantic representations of tourism and illustrates vividly how the Maya struggle to survive Patricia Zavella UC Santa Cruz As a free trade zone and Latin America s most popular destination Cancun Mexico is more than just a tourist town It is not only actively involved in the production of transnational capital but also forms an integral part of the state s modernization plan for rural Indigenous communities Indeed Maya migrants make up more than a third of the city s population A Return to Servitude is an ethnography of Maya migration within Mexico that analyzes the foundational role Indigenous peoples play in the development of the modern nation state Focusing on tourism in the Yucatan Peninsula M Bianet Castellanos examines how Cancun came to be equated with modernity how this city has shaped the political economy of the peninsula and how Indigenous communities engage with this vision of contemporary life More broadly she demonstrates how Indigenous communities experience resist and accommodate themselves to transnational capitalism Tourism and the social stratification that results from migration have created

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1095 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Rich Indians
    its synthesis of diverse materials and its ability to clearly articulate profound moral ambivalence The divergent pieces of history that Harmon connects constitute a radically new way to understand twentieth century Indian history Journal of American History This bold and provocative book is an outstanding work of scholarship It reveals the complicated and often paradoxical history of American ideas about the morality of wealth accumulation and Indians efforts to compete in the capitalist marketplace on the same terms as their non Indian counterparts Harmon is a trailblazer in the field of American Indian economic history Colleen O Neill author of Working the Navajo Way Labor and Culture in the Twentieth Century Indian and non Indian economic practices Skillfully blending social cultural and economic history Alexandra Harmon examines seven such instances of Indian affluence and the dilemmas they presented both for Native Americans and for Euro Americans dilemmas rooted in the colonial origins of the modern American economy This wide ranging book looks at controversies concerning Powhatan economic status and aims during the Virginia colony s first years the ambitions of some bicultural eighteenth century Creeks and Mohawks prospering Indians of the Southeast in the early 1800s inequality among removed tribes

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1083 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Rim Country Exodus
    the north A vast portion of this dramatic landscape is the traditional home of the Dilzhe e Tonto Apache and the Yavapai Now Daniel Herman offers a compelling narrative of how from 1864 to 1934 the Dilzhe e and the Yavapai came to central Arizona how they were conquered how they were exiled how they returned to their homeland and how through these events they found renewal Herman examines the complex contradictory and very human relations between Indians settlers and Federal agents in late nineteenth and early twentieth century Arizona a time that included Arizona s brutal Indian wars But while most tribal histories stay within the borders of the reservation Herman also chronicles how Indians who left the reservation helped build a modern state with dams hydroelectricity roads and bridges With thoughtful detail and incisive analysis Herman discusses the complex web of interactions between Apache Yavapai and Anglos that surround every aspect of the story Rim Country Exodus is part of a new movement in Western history emphasizing survival rather than disappearance Just as important this is one of the first in depth studies of the West that examines race as it was lived Race was formulated Herman argues

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1137 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Ritual and Remembrance in the Ecuadorian Andes
    clearly has great command of the languages involved allowing her to delve deeply into the subject matter Peter Wogan author of Magical Writing in Salasaca Literacy and Power in Highland Ecuador What I see here is fantastic fieldwork rich in detail and significance The author has learned the language dug deep for the most meaningful narratives traced changes over time and has generally gotten as close to an inside view of Salasacan cosmovision as anyone writing today Kris Lane author of Quito 1599 City and Colony in Transition surroundings for centuries while adapting to each new situation Today indigenous Salascans continue to devote a large part of their lives to their distinctive practices both community rituals and individual behaviors while living side by side with white mestizo culture In this book Rachel Corr provides a knowledgeable account of the Salasacan religion and rituals and their respective histories Based on eighteen years of fieldwork in Salasaca as well as extensive research in Church archives including never before published documents Corr s book illuminates how Salasacan culture adapted to Catholic traditions and recentered reinterpreted and even reshaped them to serve similarly motivated Salasacan practices demonstrating the link between formal and folk Catholicism and pre Columbian beliefs and practices Corr also explores the intense connection between the local Salasacan rituals and the mountain landscapes around them from peak to valley Ritual and Remembrance in the Ecuadorian Andes is in its portrayal of Salasacan religious culture both thorough and all encompassing Sections of the book cover everything from the performance of death rituals to stories about Amazonia as Salasacans interacted with outsiders conquistadors and camera toting tourists alike Corr also investigates the role of shamanism in modern Salasacan culture including shamanic powers and mountain spirits and the use of reshaped Andeanized Catholicism to sustain

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1000 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: The Seeds We Planted
    Hawaiian culture based charter schools in urban Honolulu The Seeds We Planted tells the story of Hālau Kū Māna against the backdrop of the Hawaiian struggle for self determination and the U S charter school movement revealing a critical tension the successes of a school celebrating indigenous culture are measured by the standards of settler colonialism How Goodyear Ka ōpua asks does an indigenous people use schooling to maintain and transform a common sense of purpose and interconnection of nationhood in the face of forces of imperialism and colonialism What roles do race gender and place play in these processes Her book with its richly descriptive portrait of indigenous education in one community offers practical answers steeped in the remarkable and largely suppressed history of Hawaiian popular learning and literacy This uniquely Hawaiian experience addresses broader concerns about what it means to enact indigenous cultural political resurgence while working within and against settler colonial structures Ultimately The Seeds We Planted shows that indigenous education can foster collective renewal and continuity About Noelani Goodyear Ka ōpua Noelani Goodyear Ka ōpua is associate professor of political science at the University of Hawai i at Mānoa She was a cofounder of the Hālau

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1148 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Selling the Indian
    Sophisticated insights on complex cross cultural phenomena demonstrating the disciplinary convergence characteristic of the best cultural studies about Indians Anyone interested in the complex intercultural contexts of twentieth century Indian arts and representations should read Selling the Indian Journal of American History often than not ignoring the impact of the process on the Indians themselves This book contains eight original contributions that consider the selling of American Indian culture and how it affects the Native community It goes beyond studies of white shamanism to focus on commercial ventures challenging readers to reconsider how Indian cultures have been commercialized in the twentieth century Some selections examine how Indians have been displayed to the public beginning with a living exhibit of Cocopa Indians at the 1904 Louisiana Purchase Exposition and extending to contemporary stagings of Indian culture for tourists at Tillicum Village near Seattle Other chapters range from the Cherokees to Puebloan peoples to Indians of Chiapas Mexico in an examination of the roles of both Indians and non Indian reformers in marketing Native arts and crafts These articles show that the commercialization and appropriation of American Indian cultures have been persistent practices of American society over the last century and constitute

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1019 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Separate Peoples, One Land
    life reveals a thriving political culture in which all levels of society participated Western Historical Quarterly Provides critical insight Makes important contributions to frontier intellectual and cultural history North Carolina Historical Review Raises questions of profound importance about the American frontier and the formation of national character Georgia Historical Quarterly Successfully illustrates the disintegration of trust and possible amity between Native Americans and white settlers in the post Revolutionary era within a more detail oriented ground level analysis than many before accomplished Southern Historian A valuable study The Journal of American History frontier in the Revolutionary and early national periods leading up to the era of rapid westward expansion and Cherokee removal Attentive to the complexities of race gender class and spirituality Cumfer offers a rare glimpse into the cultural logic of Native American African American and Euro American men and women as contact with one another powerfully transformed their ideas about themselves and the territory they came to share The Tennessee frontier shaped both Cherokee and white assumptions about diplomacy and nationhood After contact both groups moved away from local and personal notions about polity to embrace nationhood Excluded from the nationalization process slaves revived and modified African and

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1060 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Silent Victims
    book is both incredibly necessary and profoundly disturbing Perry does a beautiful job at respectfully excerpting from her extensive interview data to remind us that the hurt humiliation and violence is on going and that solving the problem is a daunting collective responsibility Law and Politics Book Review are often hidden in the shadows of crime reports She argues that scholarly and public attention to the historical and contemporary victimization of Native Americans as tribes or nations has blinded both scholars and citizens alike to the victimization of individual Native Americans It is these acts against individuals that capture her attention Silent Victims is a unique contribution to the literature on hate crime Because most extant literature treats hate crimes even racial violence rather generically this work breaks new ground with its findings For this book Perry interviewed nearly 300 Native Americans and gathered additional data in three geographic areas the Four Corners region of the U S Southwest the Great Lakes and the Northern Plains In all of these locales she found that bias related crime oppresses and segregates Native Americans Perry is well aware of the history of colonization in North America and its attendant racial violence She

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1021 (2016-02-09)
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