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  • First Peoples: Survival Schools
    and hostility in the public schools American Indian Movement AIM organizers and local Native parents came together to start their own community school For Pat Bellanger it was about cultural survival Though established in a moment of crisis the school fulfilled a goal that she had worked toward for years to create an educational system that would enable Native children never to forget who they were While AIM is best known for its national protests and political demands the survival schools foreground the movement s local and regional engagement with issues of language culture spirituality and identity In telling of the evolution and impact of the Heart of the Earth school in Minneapolis and the Red School House in St Paul Julie L Davis explains how the survival schools emerged out of AIM s local activism in education child welfare and juvenile justice and its efforts to achieve self determination over urban Indian institutions The schools provided informal supportive culturally relevant learning environments for students who had struggled in the public schools Survival school classes for example were often conducted with students and instructors seated together in a circle which signified the concept of mutual human respect Davis reveals how

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1156 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Sustaining the Cherokee Family
    of Nebraska Lincoln In this deeply researched and well written book Rose Stremlau provides a Cherokee centered narrative that focuses on how families and communities survived allotment on their own terms a study that counters conventional stories of the imminent decline of American Indians in the face of allotment Featuring an impressive use of documentary and oral history sources Sustaining the Cherokee Family is an invaluable contribution to our understanding of Native American history Katherine M B Osburn Tennessee Technological University author of Southern Ute Women Autonomy and Assimilation on the Reservation 1887 1934 allotment In Sustaining the Cherokee Family Rose Stremlau illuminates the impact of this policy on the Cherokee Nation particularly within individual families and communities in modern day northeastern Oklahoma Emphasizing Cherokee agency Stremlau reveals that Cherokee families organization cultural values and social and economic practices allowed them to adapt to private land ownership by incorporating elements of the new system into existing domestic and community based economies Drawing on evidence from a range of sources including Cherokee and United States censuses federal and tribal records local newspapers maps county probate records family histories and contemporary oral histories Stremlau demonstrates that Cherokee management of land perpetuated the

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1104 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: The Sweet Smell of Home
    O odham leavened by his gentle humor and unsullied by third party interference have no peer in the published litearture of his people While The Sweet Smell of Home is about these quintessential desert dwellers it is also about all of us who find ourselves joined in an enterprise we call life Bernard Fontana author of A Guide to Contemporary Southwest Indians Leonard Chana s drawings and paintings reflect his deep love for and understanding of his place and culture His commentary gives us even greater access to the next door but far off world of the Tohono O odham A truly generous book Jim Griffith The Southwest Center University of Arizona The insight of oral culture highlights artistic perception in this heartfelt book For a cultured artist such as Leonard Chana the words are in the art and the art is in the culture Jose Berreiro National Museum of the American Indian into his art and his images evoke the smells sounds textures and tastes of the Sonoran desert all the while depicting the values of his people He began his career by creating cards and soon was lending his art to posters and logos for many community based Native organizations Winning recognition from these groups his work was soon actively sought by them Chana s work also appears on the covers and as interior art in a number of books on southwestern and American Indian topics The Sweet Smell of Home is an autobiographical work written in Chana s own voice that unfolds through oral history interviews with anthropologist Susan Lobo Chana imparts the story of his upbringing and starting down the path toward a career as an artist Balancing humor with a keen eye for cultural detail he tells us about life both on and off the

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1030 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Taxidermic Signs
    linking the colonial imaginary from the early twentieth century with contemporary discourses Taxidermic Signs arrives in the present as a devastating critique of ongoing racism across North American Canadian Literature Pauline Wakeham s work opens up new ways of thinking about colonial representation Her fresh re reading of the relation between the construction of the Aboriginal and the semiotics of taxidermy are exemplary for cultural studies Julia Emberley author of Defamiliarizing the Aboriginal Cultural Practices and Decolonization in Canada remained inextricably linked to the politics of colonial conquest materializing Western fantasies of mastery over the natural world and control of unruly wild bodies In Taxidermic Signs Pauline Wakeham decodes the practice of taxidermy as it was performed in North America from the late nineteenth century to the present revealing its connection to ecological and racial discourses integral to the maintenance of colonial power Moving beyond the literal practice of stuffing skins Wakeham theorizes taxidermy as a sign system that conflates animality and aboriginality within colonial narratives of extinction Through a series of provocative case studies Wakeham demonstrates how the semiotics of taxidermy travel across diverse cultural texts From the display of animal specimens and aboriginal artifacts in the Banff Park

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1039 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Teaching Oregon Native Languages
    leaving many languages with only a few speakers Some languages died out but others prevailed in the privacy of homes and longhouses This book tells the story of perseverance and survival against unbelievable odds using the words of today s speakers and learners of Oregon s languages Interviews with fifty two native speakers provide valuable insights into how languages are lost and how a linguistic heritage can be brought to

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1076 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: The Third Space of Sovereignty
    both Native agency and the inconsistencies of colonial policy It will augment the growing body of literature that no longer perverts American exceptionalism to cast U S domestic colonialism as somehow sanitarily distinct from the complexities and injustices that plague other settler societies in Africa Oceania and elsewhere The Journal of American History An extremely cogent and thought provoking piece of scholarship that charts new territory in the literature The Third Space of Sovereignty will surely stand as a model for interdisciplinary theorizing about indigenous politics and nationhood Ethnohistory Bruyneel richly documents US schizophrenic policy vacillations between imperialism and liberal democratic values Choice political actors work across American spatial and temporal boundaries demanding rights and resources from the government while also challenging the imposition of colonial rule over their lives This resistance engenders what he calls a third space of sovereignty which resides neither inside nor outside the U S political system but rather exists on its boundaries exposing both the practices and limitations of American colonial rule The Third Space of Sovereignty offers fresh insights on such topics as the crucial importance of the formal end of treaty making in 1871 indigenous responses to the prospect of U S

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1043 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: To Harvest, To Hunt
    and used natural resources throughout the history of the American West Drawing on family letters oral traditions historical records and personal experience the book s contributors offer readers new perspectives on the land they live on the harvests they consume and the natural resources they manage Editor Judy Li weaves a tapestry of cultures and voices from Pueblo tribes in the Southwest and Chinese fishermen in California to Mexican braceros in Oregon and Basque sheepherders in Idaho as she details the region s historical dependence on the land and sea Otter walrus abalone grasslands timber and water are some of the vital resources discussed by writers anthropologists historians and biologists in stories that tell how cultures struggle to adapt in changing environments Spanning the last 200 years To Harvest To Hunt represents Native Americans Native Alaskans and Mexican European and Asian immigrants as varied in their perspectives as the landscapes the book describes Readers will come to appreciate the region s once abundant resources and find this book an illuminating overview of the dynamic between people and the land Contributors John Bieter Dolly Garza Erlinda Gonzales Berry Steven W Hackel David Hatch Deanna Kingston Jim LeMonds Irene Martin David Mas

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1070 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: The Tourist State
    address the embodied dimensions of biopolitics and explore the collision of race performance and the cultural poetics of the state Margaret Werry exposes the real drama behind the new New Zealand revealing how a nation was sold to the world and to itself The story stretches back to the so called Liberal Era at the beginning of the twentieth century in which the young settler colony touted itself as the

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1131 (2016-02-09)
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