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  • First Peoples: Trans-Indigenous
    Indigenous agency Through demonstrations of distinct forms of juxtaposition across historical periods and geographical borders across tribes and nations across the Indigenous settler binary across genre and media Allen reclaims aspects of the Indigenous archive from North America Hawaii Aotearoa New Zealand and Australia that have been largely left out of the scholarly conversation He engages systems of Indigenous aesthetics such as the pictographic discourse of Plains Indian winter counts

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1134 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: The Transit of Empire
    scope The Transit of Empire puts Indianness at the center of American histories that are not only national but explicitly imperial and colonial Jodi Byrd s brilliant critique of contemporary multicultural liberalism places American Indian and Indigenous studies in close dialogue with postcolonial scholarship transforming both in the process It is a work of power complexity and commitment and should not be missed by anyone in these fields Philip Deloria In The Transit of Empire Jodi A Byrd explores how indigeneity functions as transit a trajectory of movement that serves as precedent within U S imperial history Byrd argues that contemporary U S empire expands itself through a transferable Indianness that facilitates acquisitions of lands territories and resources Examining an array of literary texts historical moments and pending legislation from the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma s vote in 2007 to expel Cherokee Freedmen to the Native Hawaiian Government Reorganization bill Byrd demonstrates that inclusion into the multicultural cosmopole does not end colonialism as it is purported to do Rather that inclusion is the very site of the colonization that feeds U S empire Byrd contends that the colonization of American Indian and Indigenous nations is the necessary ground from which

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1106 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Trust in the Land
    of probing inquiry is exceptional contributing to not only a theoretical understanding of the issue but also to the tools used and their practical limitations and strengths Mary Christina Wood University of Oregon tribes are working to protect their access to culturally important lands by collaborating with Native and non Native conservation movements By using private conservation partnerships to reacquire lost land tribes can ensure the health and sustainability of vital natural resources In particular tribal governments are using conservation easements and land trusts to reclaim rights to lost acreage Through the use of these and other private conservation tools tribes are able to protect or in some cases buy back the land that was never sold but rather was taken from them Trust in the Land sets into motion a new wave of ideas concerning land conservation This informative book will appeal to Native and non Native individuals and organizations interested in protecting the land as well as environmentalists and government agencies About Beth Rose Middleton Beth Rose Middleton has published articles in Economic Development Quarterly the Journal of Political Ecology Ethnohistory and News from Native California She is an assistant professor at the University of California Davis in

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1099 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: The Truth About Stories
    a wonderful study of the power of words Booklist What is revealed in the is graceful even seductive book of essays about storytelling by the esteemed Cherokee novelist radio personality university professor and Canadian emigre is that what is as important as the stories we tell about the world are the ways in which we interpret those stories World Literature in Review understand and interact with other people From creation stories to personal experiences historical anecdotes to social injustices racist propaganda to works of contemporary Native literature King probes Native culture s deep ties to storytelling With wry humor King deftly weaves events from his own life as a child in California an academic in Canada and a Native North American with a wide ranging discussion of stories told by and about Indians So many stories have been told about Indians King comments that there is no reason for the Indian to be real The Indian simply has to exist in our imaginations That imaginative Indian that North Americans hold dear has been challenged by Native writers N Scott Momaday Leslie Marmon Silko Louis Owens Robert Alexie and others who provide alternative narratives of the Native experience that question a

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1044 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Unearthing Indian Land
    In this book Kristin Ruppel considers the complicated issues surrounding American Indian land ownership in the United States Under the General Allotment Act of 1887 also known as the Dawes Act individual Indians were issued title to land allotments while so called surplus Indian lands were opened to non Indian settlement During the forty seven years that the act remained in effect American Indians lost an estimated 90 million acres of land about two thirds of the land they had held in 1887 Worse the loss of control over the land left to them has remained an ongoing and insidious result Unearthing Indian Land traces the complex legacies of allotment including numerous instructive examples of a policy gone wrong Aside from the initial catastrophic land loss the fractionated land ownership that resulted from the act s provisions has disrupted native families and their descendants for more than a century With each new generation the owners of tribal lands grow in number and therefore own ever smaller interests in parcels of land It is not uncommon now to find reservation allotments co owned by hundreds of individuals Coupled with the federal government s troubled trusteeship of Indian assets this means that

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1020 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Voices of Play
    everyday communication Voices of Play is a study of multi ethnic autonomous region on the Atlantic Coast of Nicaragua Corn Island is historically home to Afro Caribbean Creole people but increasing numbers of Miskitu people began moving there from the mainland during the Contra War and many Spanish speaking mestizos from western Nicaragua have also settled there Miskitu kids on Corn Island often gain some competence speaking Miskitu Spanish and Kriol English As the children of migrants and the first generation of their families to grow up with television they develop creative forms of expression that combine languages and genres shaping intercultural senses of belonging Voices of Play is the first ethnography to focus on the interaction between music and language in children s discourse Minks skillfully weaves together Latin American North American and European theories of culture and communication creating a transdisciplinary dialogue that moves across intellectual geographies Her analysis shows how music and language involve a wide range of communicative resources that create new forms of belonging and enable dialogue across differences Miskitu children s voices reveal the intertwining of speech and song the emergence of self and other and the centrality of aesthetics to social struggle About

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1150 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Walking the Clouds
    contributions often categorized as magical realism by authors like Leslie Marmon Silko and Sherman Alexie and authors more recognizable to science fiction fans like William Sanders and Stephen Graham Jones Dillon s engaging introduction situates the pieces in the larger context of science fiction and its conventions Organized by sub genre the book starts with Native slipstream stories infused with time travel alternate realities and alternative history like Vizenor s Custer on the Slipstream Next up are stories about contact with other beings featuring among others an excerpt from Gerry William s The Black Ship Dillon includes stories that highlight Indigenous science like a piece from Archie Weller s Land of the Golden Clouds asserting that one of the roles of Native science fiction is to disentangle that science from notions of primitive knowledge and myth The fourth section calls out stories of apocalypse like William Sanders When This World Is All on Fire and a piece from Zainab Amadahy s The Moons of Palmares The anthology closes with examples of biskaabiiyang or returning to ourselves bringing together stories like Eden Robinson s Terminal Avenue and a piece from Robert Sullivan s Star Waka An essential book for readers and

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1132 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Walking the Land, Feeding the Fire
    unfolds a philosophy for the future Walking the Land Feeding the Fire vividly shows how through stories and relationships with all beings Tlicho knowledge is produced and rooted in the land Tlicho speaking people are part of the more widespread Athapaskan speaking community which spans the western sub arctic and includes pockets in British Columbia Alberta California and Arizona Anthropologist Allice Legat undertook this work at the request of Tlicho Dene community elders who wanted to provide younger Tlicho with narratives that originated in the past but provide a way of thinking through current critical land use issues Legat illustrates that for the Tlicho Dene being knowledgeable and being of the land are one and the same Walking the Land Feeding the Fire marks the beginning of a new era of understanding drawing both connections to and unique aspects of ways of knowing among other Dene peoples such as the Western Apache As Keith Basso did with his studies among the Western Apache in earlier decades Legat sets a new standard for research by presenting Dene perceptions of the environment and the personal truths of the storytellers without forcing them into scientific or public policy frameworks Legat approaches her work

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1120 (2016-02-09)
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