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  • First Peoples: The Way of Kinship
    remaining traditional cultures I am extremely grateful these writers have told their stories and thankful the editors have presented this most important anthology Rudolfo Anaya That these treasures are available to us as writing is a miracle The writings here while altogether modern in one sense are based on a literature albeit oral that has existed for thousands of years They are the reflections of people who have lived long on the earth on their own terms in harmony with the powers of nature They are invaluable to us who have so much to learn from them These stories poems songs give us a way a sacred way into a world that we ought to know for its own sake It is our own world after all N Scott Momaday from the Foreword The first anthology of Native Siberian literature in English The Way of Kinship represents writers from regions extending from the Ob River in the west to the Chukotka peninsula the easternmost point of the Siberian Russian Arctic Drawn from seven distinct ethnic groups this diverse body of work prose fiction poetry drama and creative nonfiction chronicles ancient Siberian cultures and traditions threatened with extinction in the contemporary

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1094 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: We Are Our Language
    least the preservation of an Indigenous language is a pressing concern Understanding the issue involves far more than compiling simple usage statistics or documenting the grammar of a tongue it requires examining the social practices and philosophies that affect Indigenous language survival In presenting the case of Kaska an endangered language in an Athabaskan community in the Yukon Barbra Meek asserts that language revitalization requires more than just linguistic rehabilitation it demands a social transformation The process must mend rips and tears in the social fabric of the language community that result from an enduring colonial history focused on termination These disjunctures include government policies conflicting with community goals widely varying teaching methods and generational viewpoints and even clashing ideologies within the language community This book provides a detailed investigation of language revitalization based on more than two years of active participation in local language renewal efforts Each chapter focuses on a different dimension such as spelling and expertise conversation and social status family practices and bureaucratic involvement in local language choices Each situation illustrates the balance between the desire for linguistic continuity and the reality of disruption About Barbra A Meek Barbra A Meek is an associate professor of

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1091 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: We Are an Indian Nation
    their land The Hualapai survival battle is not as well known as other tribal reclamation efforts and the author draws upon interviews participant observations and archival research to describe how thirteen bands of extended families known as The Pai confronted colonization and recast themselves as a modern Indigenous Nation This is a book to inspire and instruct about the essential nature of courage standing up for your people and building your own future Suzan Shown Harjo Cheyenne Hodulgee Muscogee President The Morning Star Institute In less than twenty five years after first encountering Anglos the Hualapais had lost more than half their population and nearly all their land and found themselves consigned to a reservation This book focuses on the historical construction of the Hualapai Nation in the face of modern American colonialism Drawing on archival research interviews and participant observation Jeffrey Shepherd describes how thirteen bands of extended families known as the Pai confronted American colonialism and in the process recast themselves as a modern Indigenous nation Shepherd shows that Hualapai nation building was a complex process shaped by band identities competing visions of the past creative reactions to modernity and resistance to state power He analyzes how the Hualapais transformed an externally imposed tribal identity through nationalist discourses of protecting aboriginal territory and he examines how that discourse strengthened the Hualapais claim to land and water while simultaneously reifying a politicized version of their own history Along the way he sheds new light on familiar topics Indian white conflict the creation of tribal government wage labor federal policy and Native activism by applying theories of race space historical memory and decolonization Drawing on recent work in American Indian history and Native American studies Shepherd shows how the Hualapai have strived to reclaim a distinct identity and culture in

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1001 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: We Have a Religion
    legal battles over sacred Although the debate is not well remembered today the Pueblo Dances affair is one of the most important legal and political conflicts over religious freedom in American history In this well researched study Tisa Wenger does a fine job of describing the affair and vividly highlights the cast of activists on both sides Philip Jenkins author of Dream Catchers How Mainstream America Discovered Native Spirituality Wenger s book makes a significant contribution to our understanding of the strange career of religion by doing a superb and unmatchable job of recovering the full complexity of how that idea related to the Puebloan dance controversy Joel Martin University of Massachusetts Amherst lands peyote use and hunting practices the U S government has often acted as if Indian traditions were somehow not truly religious and therefore not eligible for the constitutional protections of the First Amendment In this book Tisa Wenger shows that cultural notions about what constitutes religion are crucial to public debates over religious freedom In the 1920s Pueblo Indian leaders in New Mexico and a sympathetic coalition of non Indian reformers successfully challenged government and missionary attempts to suppress Indian dances by convincing a skeptical public

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1050 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: We Were All Like Migrant Workers Here
    participation as wage laborers in an expanding market economy Rather than a story of victimization Bauer offers a satisfyingly complicated view of how California Indians reimagined themselves and survived Grounded in extensive archival and oral history research this is certain to become a classic work in American Indian and labor history David Rich Lewis Utah State University Bauer s analysis helps us understand more profoundly the totality of life on a northern California Indian reservation The book is nicely conceived engaging and nuanced and original in its arguments It will be enthusiastically read and widely cited David Vaught Texas A M University gold rush people from several of these tribes were relocated to a reservation farm in northern Mendocino County Fusing Native American history and labor history William Bauer Jr chronicles the evolution of work community and tribal identity among the Round Valley Indians in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries that enabled their survival and resistance to assimilation Drawing on oral history interviews Bauer brings Round Valley Indian voices to the forefront in a narrative that traces their adaptations to shifting social and economic realities first within unfree labor systems including outright slavery and debt peonage and later as wage

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1052 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: We Will Secure our Future
    and accomplishments have exemplified the ongoing efforts by American Indian communities to gain greater control over their lives and lands He has made important contributions in many areas but education has always been one of his main priorities Perhaps no one in the Southwest has done more than Peterson Zah to increase the recruitment retention and graduation of American Indian students from colleges and universities Zah s presentations to Peter Iverson s classes at Arizona State University employed examples drawn from his own experiences Students praised his thoughtful honest and direct observations He reinforced a central theme in Iverson s classes that Indian history encompasses triumph as well as tragedy and victory as well as victimization This book grew out of Iverson s determination to share Zah s insights with a wider audience The two met every few months to consider many subjects related to Zah s life These sessions formed the foundation for this volume Part autobiography part interview and part conversation Zah and Iverson s account touches on a wide range of overlapping topics but two central themes prevail education and empowerment We Will Secure Our Future is a fascinating look into the life of a man who

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1124 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: White Man's Water
    Montana where for many decades the federally funded health care system has relied on the Twelve Step program of Alcoholics Anonymous White Man s Water provides a thoughtful and careful analysis of Cheyenne views of sobriety and the politics that surround the selective appeal of Twelve Step approaches despite wide ranging local critiques Narratives from participants in these programs debunk long standing stereotypes about Indian drinking and offer insight into the diversity of experiences with alcohol that actually occur among Native North Americans This critical ethnography employs vivid accounts of the Northern Cheyenne people to depict how problems with alcohol are culturally constructed showing how differences in age gender and other social features can affect involvement with both drinking and sobriety These testimonies reveal the key role that gender plays in how Twelve Step program participants engage in a selective and creative process of appropriation at Northern Cheyenne adapting the program to accommodate local cultural priorities and spiritual resources The testimonies also illuminate community reactions to these adaptations inspiring deeper inquiry into how federally funded health services are provided on the reservation This book will appeal to readers with an interest in Native studies ethnography women s studies and medical

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1109 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Women and Knowledge in Mesoamerica
    together This book is a significant and heartfelt contribution to women s and gender studies Latin American Studies Chicana o and Borderlands studies as well as emerging intercultural dialogues on medicine and healing Analisa Taylor author of Indigeneity in the Mexican Cultural Imagination Thresholds of Belonging colonization Martinez Cruz asserts that indigenous and mestiza women healers are custodians of a knowledge base that remains virtually uncharted The few works looking at the knowledge of women in Mesoamerica generally examine only the written even academic world accessible only to the most elite segments of customarily male society These works have consistently excluded the essential repertoire and performed knowledge of women who think and work in ways other than the textual And while two of the book s chapters critique contemporary novels Martinez Cruz also calls for the exploration of non textual knowledge trans mission In this regard its goals and methods are close to those of performance scholarship and anthropology and these methods reveal Mesoamerican women to be public intellectuals In Women and Knowledge in Mesoamerica fieldwork and ethnography combine to reveal women healers as models of agency Her multidisciplinary approach allows Martinez Cruz to disrupt Euro based intellectual hegemony and

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1113 (2016-02-09)
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