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  • First Peoples: Anetso, the Cherokee Ball Game
    impact of tourism on culture An important and informative work Sam D Gill University of Colorado at Boulder Zogry presents a very well researched ethically grounded and theoretically informed study of Anetso the Cherokee ball game which will instruct students of Native American religions Cherokee traditions and history and the anthropology of sport A valuable book that is based on impressive archival and ethnographic work Michael D McNally Carleton College several linked ritual activities Is it a sport Is it a religious ritual Could it possibly be both Why has it lasted so long surviving through centuries of upheaval and change Based on his work in the field and in the archives Michael J Zogry argues that members of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Nation continue to perform selected aspects of their cultural identity by engaging in anetso itself the hub of an extended ceremonial complex or cycle A precursor to lacrosse anetso appears in all manner of Cherokee cultural narratives and has figured prominently in the written accounts of non Cherokee observers for almost three hundred years The anetso ceremonial complex incorporates a variety of activities which taken together complicate standard scholarly distinctions such as game versus ritual public

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1046 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Asserting Native Resilience
    as a model for Native and non Native communities alike Native American nations in the Pacific Northwest First Nations in Canada and Indigenous peoples around the Pacific Rim have already been deeply affected by droughts flooding reduced glaciers and snowmelts seasonal shifts in winds and storms and changes in species on the land and in the ocean Having survived the historical and ecological wounds inflicted by colonization industrialization and urbanization Indigenous peoples are using tools of resilience that have enabled them to respond to sudden environmental changes and protect the habitat of salmon and other culturally vital species They are creating defenses to strengthen their communities mitigate losses and adapt where possible Asserting Native Resilience presents a rich variety of perspectives on Indigenous responses to the climate crisis reflecting the voices of more than twenty contributors including Indigenous leaders and Native and non Native scientists scholars and activists from the Pacific Northwest British Columbia Alaska and Aotearoa New Zealand Also included are a resource directory of Indigenous governments non governmental organizations and communities that are researching and responding to climate change and a community organizing booklet for use by Northwest tribes About Zoltán Grossman Zoltán Grossman is a senior research

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1128 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: At the Border of Empires
    were often invisible to the majority cultures of the region they attracted the attention of reformers and government officials in the United States who were determined to assimilate native peoples into American society By focusing on gender norms and ideals in the assimilation of the Tohono O odham At the Border of Empires provides a lens for looking at both Native American history and broader societal ideas about femininity masculinity and empire around the turn of the twentieth century Beginning in the 1880s the US government implemented programs to eliminate vice among the Tohono O odham and to encourage the morals of the majority culture as the basis of a process of Americanization During the next fifty years tribal norms interacted with sometimes conflicting with and sometimes reinforcing those of the larger society in ways that significantly shaped both government policy and tribal experience This book examines the mediation between cultures the officials who sometimes developed policies based on personal beliefs and gender biases and the native people whose lives were impacted as a result These issues are brought into useful relief by comparing the experiences of the Tohono O odham on two sides of a border that was from

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1152 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Bernie Whitebear
    1930s reservation and grew to a powwow organizer whose influence improved the lives of Indians across the country Midwest Book Review Reyes tribute to his brother is uplifting and informative offering a firsthand view of the progress of Indian rights during the last half of the twentieth century Booklist they found unemployment and discrimination and they were no better off Sin Aikst Indian Bernie Whitebear was an urban activist in the Pacific Northwest during the last decades of the twentieth century a man dedicated to improving the lives of Indians and other ethnic groups by working for change and justice He unified Northwest tribes to fight for the return of their land and was the first to accomplish this in the United States But far from a fearsome agitator Bernie was a persuasive figure who won the praise and admiration of an entire community Bernie began organizing powwows in the 1960s with an eye toward greater authenticity and by making a name in the Seattle area as an entertainment promoter he soon became a successful networker and master of diplomacy enabling him to win over those who had long ignored the problems of urban Indians Soft spoken but outspoken Bernie successfully negotiated with officials at all levels of government on behalf of Indians and other minorities crossing into political territory normally off limits to his people Bernie Whitebear s story takes readers from an impoverished youth including a rare account of life on the Colville Reservation during the 1930s to the Red Power movement as it traces Bernie s emergence as an activist influenced by contemporaries such as Bob Satiacum Vine DeLoria and Joe Delacruz By choosing this course Bernie was clearly making a break with his past but with an eye toward a better future whether staging the successful

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1029 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Bitter Water
    presents a Navajo ethos and reality that few non Navajo people know about It is this kind of dimensional work that will help readers gain a deeper insight into Navajo life Donald L Fixico Arizona State University northeastern Arizona the saga continues The 1974 Settlement Act officially divided a reservation established almost a century earlier between the Dine Navajo and the Hopi and legally granted the contested land to the Hopi To date the U S government has relocated between 12 000 and 14 000 Dine from Hopi Partitioned Lands and the Dine both there and elsewhere continue to live with the legacy of this relocation Bitter Water presents the narratives of four Dine women who have resisted removal but who have watched as their communities and lifeways have changed dramatically The book based on 25 hours of filmed personal testimony features the women s candid discussions of their efforts to carry on a traditional way of life in a contemporary world that includes relocation and partitioned lands encroaching Western values and culture and devastating mineral extraction and development in the Black Mesa region of Arizona Though their accounts are framed by insightful writings by both Benally and Dine historian Jennifer Nez Denetdale Benally lets the stories of the four women elders speak for themselves Scholars media and other outsiders have all told their versions of this story but this is the first book that centers on the stories of women who have lived it in their own words in Navajo as well as the English translation The result is a living history of a contested cultural landscape and the unique worldview of women determined to maintain their traditions and lifeways which are so intimately connected to the land This book is more than a collection of stories poetry and

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1100 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Black Slaves, Indian Masters
    gender ideologies that justified this practice and marginalized free black people in the Indian nations well after the Civil War and slavery had ended Through the end of the nineteenth century ongoing conflicts among Choctaw Chickasaw and U S lawmakers left untold numbers of former slaves and their descendants in the two Indian nations without citizenship in either the Indian nations or the United States In this groundbreaking study Barbara

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1155 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Black and Indigenous
    and black Diaspora and rooted and tradition and modernity in radically innovative and freshly productive ways Bettina Ng weno author of Turf Wars Territory and Citizenship in the Contemporary State Black and Indigenous is a nuanced and important addition to the identities literature in Latin America Anderson does justice to Sambenos and activists alike American Ethnologist Black and Indigenous will make an important contribution to the growing literature on blackness and also indigenous identity in Latin America Peter Wade author of Race Nature and Culture An Anthropological Approach Ethnographically rich and theoretically sophisticated this book adds a great deal of insight into the literature on race racial identities and ethnic politics The Americas America Examining this set of paradoxes Mark Anderson shows how on the one hand Garifuna embrace discourses of tradition roots and a paradigm of ethnic political struggle On the other hand Garifuna often affirm blackness through assertions of African roots and affiliations with Blacks elsewhere drawing particularly on popular images of U S blackness embodied by hip hop music and culture Black and Indigenous explores the politics of race and culture among Garifuna in Honduras as a window into the active relations among multiculturalism consumption and neoliberalism

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1033 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Bonds of Alliance
    of North America carrying thousands of Native Americans into bondage in the Great Lakes Canada and the Caribbean In Bonds of Alliance Brett Rushforth reveals the dynamics of this system from its origins to the end of French colonial rule Balancing a vast geographic and chronological scope with careful attention to the lives of enslaved individuals this book gives voice to those who lived through the ordeal of slavery and along the way shaped French and Native societies Rather than telling a simple story of colonial domination and Native victimization Rushforth argues that Indian slavery in New France emerged at the nexus of two very different forms of slavery one indigenous to North America and the other rooted in the Atlantic world The alliances that bound French and Natives together forced a century long negotiation over the nature of slavery and its place in early American society Neither fully Indian nor entirely French slavery in New France drew upon and transformed indigenous and Atlantic cultures in complex and surprising ways Based on thousands of French and Algonquian language manuscripts archived in Canada France the United States and the Caribbean Bonds of Alliance bridges the divide between continental and Atlantic approaches

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1123 (2016-02-09)
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