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  • First Peoples: The Color of the Land
    and groundbreaking book is deeply researched broadly engaged with important debates and thoroughly convincing Claudio Saunt author of Black White and Indian Race and the Unmaking of an American Family There are few scholars capable of addressing all the potential axes of investigation as fully and thoroughly as Chang does To weave Indians African Americans and Euro Americans together into one story that also encompasses race class nation and land is to account for the variables historians have been discussing in a piecemeal fashion for a generation or more At once explicitly comparative and exquisitely sensitive to the connections between the units under comparison this is the kind of work that we need more of Joshua A Piker University of Oklahoma and remade in conflicts over who would own land who would farm it and who would rule it This story disrupts expected narratives of the American past revealing how identities race nation and class took new forms in struggles over the creation of different systems of property Conflicts were unleashed by a series of sweeping changes the forced removal of the Creeks from their homeland to Oklahoma in the 1830s the transformation of the Creeks enslaved black population into

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1054 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: The Common Pot
    bravely demonstrates that Native New England s literary heritage actually represents Good Medicine in the most traditional Indian sense of the word Taput ni Thank You Lisa Brooks for showing the next generation of Native American writers that their path is true Melissa Tantaquidgeon Zobel Mohegan Medicine Woman and Tribal Historian Reading Native lands and Native texts to recover Native history Lisa Brooks has produced an innovative insightful and stimulating book that restores New England as Native space and adds a vital perspective to the written history of the region Colin G Calloway Dartmouth College to exist within it In striking counterpoint to these analyses Lisa Brooks demonstrates the ways in which Native leaders including Samson Occom Joseph Brant Hendrick Aupaumut and William Apess adopted writing as a tool to reclaim rights and land in the Native networks of what is now the northeastern United States The Common Pot a metaphor that appears in Native writings during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries embodies land community and the shared space of sustenance among relations Far from being corrupted by forms of writing introduced by European colonizers Brooks contends Native people frequently rejected the roles intended for them by their missionary teachers

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1040 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Comparative Indigeneities of the Américas
    understanding the commonalities in these Indigenous experiences will strengthen resistance to colonial forces still at play This volume marks a critical moment in bringing together transnational and interdisciplinary scholarship to articulate new ways of pursuing critical Indigenous studies Comparative Indigeneities of the Américas highlights intersecting themes such as indigenísmo mestizaje migration displacement autonomy sovereignty borders spirituality and healing that have historically shaped the experiences of Native peoples across the Américas In doing so it promotes a broader understanding of the relationships between Native communities in the United States and Canada and those in Latin America and the Caribbean and invites a hemispheric understanding of the relationships between Native and mestiza o peoples Through path breaking approaches to transnational multidisciplinary scholarship and theory the chapters in this volume advance understandings of indigeneity in the Américas and lay a strong foundation for further research This book will appeal to scholars and students in the fields of anthropology literary and cultural studies history Native American and Indigenous studies women and gender studies Chicana o studies and critical ethnic studies Ultimately this deeply informative and empowering book demonstrates the various ways that Indigenous and mestiza o peoples resist state and imperial attempts to erase

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1138 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: A Concise Dictionary of Minnesota Ojibwe
    in the New England wilderness Matt Cohen gives us a lucid and eye opening new understanding of textuality performance interpretation and cultural contact extending far beyond the seventeenth century context that is the book s focus Christopher Castiglia author of Bound and Determined and Interior States This dictionary is an essential addition to the study and preservation of the Ojbwe language Lorie Roy American Indian Libraries Newsletter the most frequently used Ojibwe words Presented in Ojibwe English and English Ojibwe sections this dictionary spells words to reflect their actual pronunciation with a direct match between the letters used and the speech sounds of Ojibwe It contains many ancient words and meanings as well as language added in the twentieth century Most entries give several sample inflected forms such as the plural diminutive and locative forms of nouns and first person and participle forms of verbs The basic patterns of Ojibwe word structure and the organization of the dictionary entries are clearly explained in the introduction The most widely used modern standard writing system for Ojibwe is used throughout and some of the key objects of Ojibwe life are authentically illustrated by coauthor and artist Earl Nyholm Acknowledged as one of

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1035 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: The Copyright Thing Doesn't Work Here
    Atlantic Kwasi Konadu City University of New York This fine grained historical and ethnographic inquiry into the social life of Ghanaian textiles is quite simply and by several degrees of magnitude the best study anywhere of how Western tropes of intellectual property fail to grasp the complexity of systems in which the traditional arts are practiced today It tells a cautionary tale with urgent implications for IP scholarship and it should be required reading for policy makers in world capitals and at international organizations Peter Jaszi American University In Ghana adinkra and kente textiles derive their significance from their association with both Asante and Ghanaian cultural nationalism Adinkra made by stenciling patterns with black dye and kente a type of strip weaving each convey through color style and adornment the bearer s identity social status and even emotional state Yet both textiles have been widely mass produced outside Ghana particularly in East Asia without any compensation to the originators of the designs In The Copyright Thing Doesn t Work Here Boatema Boateng focuses on the appropriation and protection of adinkra and kente cloth in order to examine the broader implications of the use of intellectual property law to preserve folklore and other traditional forms of knowledge Boateng investigates the compatibility of indigenous practices of authorship and ownership with those established under intellectual property law considering the ways in which both are responses to the changing social and historical conditions of decolonization and globalization Comparing textiles to the more secure copyright protection that Ghanaian musicians enjoy under Ghanaian copyright law she demonstrates that different forms of social cultural and legal capital are treated differently under intellectual property law Boateng then moves beyond Africa expanding her analysis to the influence of cultural nationalism among the diaspora particularly in the United States on

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1097 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: The Corner of the Living
    the tortured tale of Shining Path guerrillas from the 1960s through the first decade of the 21st century The villagers of Chuschi and Huaychao high in the mountains of the department of Ayacucho have an iconic place in this violent history Emphasizing the years leading up to the peak period of violence from 1980 to 2000 when 69 000 people lost their lives Miguel La Serna asks why some Andean peasants chose to embrace Shining Path ideology and others did not Drawing on archival materials and ethnographic field work La Serna argues that historically rooted and locally specific power relations social conflicts and cultural understandings shaped the responses of indigenous peasants to the insurgency In Chuschi the guerrillas found indigenous support for the movement and dreamed of sparking a worldwide Maoist revolution In Huaychao by contrast villagers rose up against Shining Path forces precipitating more violence and feeding an international uproar that took on political significance for Peru during the Cold War The Corner of the Living illuminates both the stark realities of life for the rural poor everywhere and why they may or may not choose to mobilize around a revolutionary cause About Miguel La Serna Miguel La Serna

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1117 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Creek Paths and Federal Roads
    argued and well supported work Of the numerous recent works on the Creeks none considers the significance of mobility and roadways in a similar manner giving Hudson a truly unique perspective Intersecting several rarely connected topics Creek Paths and Federal Roads should have a broad appeal Florida Historical Quarterly Gracefully written and carefully argued Creek Paths and Federal Roads deserves the attention of all scholars of Native America and the early American frontier Journal of American History This is a sound well written and important work that tells the story of Indians in the South and reveals the complexity and interrelatedness of American history The North Carolina Historical Review Indian nations and the southern states from the founding of the United States until the forced removal of southeastern Indians in the 1830s During the early national period Hudson explains settlers and slaves made their way along Indian trading paths and federal post roads deep into the heart of the Creek Indians world Hudson focuses particularly on the creation and mapping of boundaries between Creek Indian lands and the states that grew up around them the development of roads canals and other internal improvements within these territories and the ways that

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1053 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Creole Indigeneity
    enslaved Africans and indentured Indians In Creole Indigeneity Shona N Jackson investigates how their descendants collectively called Creoles have remade themselves as Guyana s new natives displacing indigenous peoples in the Caribbean through an extension of colonial attitudes and policies Looking particularly at the nation s politically fraught decades from the 1950s to the present Jackson explores aboriginal and Creole identities in Guyanese society Through government documents interviews and political speeches she reveals how Creoles though unable to usurp the place of aboriginals as First Peoples in the New World nonetheless managed to introduce a new more socially viable definition of belonging through labor The very reason for bringing enslaved and indentured workers into Caribbean labor became the organizing principle for Creoles new identities Creoles linked true belonging and so political and material right to having performed modern labor on the land labor thus became the basis for their subaltern settler modes of indigeneity a contradiction for belonging under postcoloniality that Jackson terms Creole indigeneity In doing so her work establishes a new and productive way of understanding the relationship between national power and identity in colonial postcolonial and anticolonial contexts About Shona N Jackson Shona N Jackson is assistant

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1133 (2016-02-09)
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