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  • First Peoples: Creole Subjects in the Colonial Americas
    elite culture Ivy Schweitzer Dartmouth College These essays capture the emerging ambivalent claims of elite creole identities in the early modern Americas Acknowledging difference between colonial cultures of northern and southern European origins they illuminate key common themes and continuities and set the stage for a new generation of Atlantic studies Karen Ordahl Kupperman New York University Valuable A powerful resource in the critical debate about creole subjectivity and a way forward in the effort to transcend modern and early modern national and imperial boundaries in the study of the colonial Americas Latin American Review of Books from the Old World to the New World this collection of eighteen original essays investigates the creolization of literary forms and genres in the Americas between the sixteenth and nineteenth centuries Creole Subjects in the Colonial Americas facilitates a cross disciplinary intrahemispheric and Atlantic comparison of early settlers colonialism and creole elites relation to both indigenous peoples and imperial regimes Contributors explore literatures written in Spanish Portuguese and English to identify creole responses to such concepts as communal identity local patriotism nationalism and literary expression The essays take the reader from the first debates about cultural differences that underpinned European ideologies of conquest

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1056 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Crooked Paths to Allotment
    Civil War state formation offering further evidence that U S history sans American Indians is a failed project Jacki Thompson Rand University of Iowa Genetin Pilawa makes a strong argument bound to stimulate debate I know of no recent work that does what this book promises to do Jeffrey Ostler University of Oregon Allotment Act In Crooked Paths to Allotment C Joseph Genetin Pilawa complicates these narratives focusing on political moments when viable alternatives to federal assimilation policies arose In these moments Native American reformers and their white allies challenged coercive practices and offered visions for policies that might have allowed Indigenous nations to adapt at their own pace and on their own terms Examining the contests over Indian policy from Reconstruction through the Gilded Age Genetin Pilawa reveals the contingent state of American settler colonialism Genetin Pilawa focuses on reformers and activists including Tonawanda Seneca Ely S Parker and Council Fire editor Thomas A Bland whose contributions to Indian policy debates have heretofore been underappreciated He reveals how these men and their allies opposed such policies as forced land allotment the elimination of traditional cultural practices mandatory boarding school education for Indian youth and compulsory participation in the market

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1144 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Decolonizing Museums
    Yale University Lonetree incorporates elements of memoir interpretation observation and anthropology interspersed with theory and local history to make museums come alive for the reader There are no other books like it in existence Nancy Parezo University of Arizona content In Decolonizing Museums Amy Lonetree examines the complexities of these new relationships with an eye toward exploring how museums can grapple with centuries of unresolved trauma as they tell the stories of Native peoples She investigates how museums can honor Indigenous worldviews and ways of knowing challenge stereotypical representations and speak the hard truths of colonization within exhibition spaces to address the persistent legacies of historical unresolved grief in Native communities Lonetree focuses on the representation of Native Americans in exhibitions at the Smithsonian s National Museum of the American Indian the Mille Lacs Indian Museum in Minnesota and the Ziibiwing Center of Anishinabe Culture and Lifeways in Michigan Drawing on her experiences as an Indigenous scholar and museum professional Lonetree analyzes exhibition texts and images records of exhibition development and interviews with staff members She addresses historical and contemporary museum practices and charts possible paths for the future curation and presentation of Native lifeways About Amy Lonetree Amy Lonetree

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1143 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Desert Indian Woman
    many more incidents Manuel relates her story with wit and perspective Publishers Weekly Through heartwarming and largely unedited prose Manuel relates her instruction in tribal traditions the strong influence of her grandparents life in a boarding school and the harmony among her dreams songs and folklore Like most human stories her account is the tale of sadness hopes expectations and dreams but most importantly survival Journal of the West shares the story of her life She tells of O odham culture and society and of the fortunes and misfortunes of Native Americans in the southwestern borderlands over the past century In Desert Indian Woman Frances relates her life and her stories with the wit humor and insight that have endeared her to family and friends She tells of her early childhood growing up in a mesquite brush house her training in tribal traditions her acquaintance with Mexican ways and her education in an American boarding school Through her recollections of births and deaths heartache and happiness we learn of her family s migration from the reservation to the barrios and back again In the details of her everyday life we see how Frances has navigated between O odham and American societies always keeping her grandparents traditional teachings as her compass It is extraordinary to hear from a Native American woman like Frances in her own words and her own point of view to enter the complex and sensitive aspects of her life experience her sorrows and her dreams We also become privy to her continuing search for her identity across the border and the ways in which Frances and Deborah have attempted to make sense of their friendship over twenty odd years Throughout the book Deborah captures the rhythms of Frances s narrative style conveying the connectedness of her dreams

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1027 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Eating the Landscape
    and northern Mexico Salmón weaves his historical and cultural knowledge as a renowned Indigenous ethnobotanist with stories American Indian farmers have shared with him to illustrate how traditional Indigenous foodways from the cultivation of crops to the preparation of meals are rooted in a time honored understanding of environmental stewardship In this fascinating personal narrative Salmón focuses on an array of Indigenous farmers who uphold traditional agricultural practices in the face of modern changes to food systems such as extensive industrialization and the genetic modification of food crops Despite the vast cultural and geographic diversity of the region he explores Salmón reveals common themes the importance of participation in a reciprocal relationship with the land the connection between each group s cultural identity and their ecosystems and the indispensable correlation of land consciousness and food consciousness Salmón shows that these collective philosophies provide the foundation for Indigenous resilience as the farmers contend with global climate change and other disruptions to long established foodways This resilience along with the rich stores of traditional ecological knowledge maintained by Indigenous agriculturalists Salmón explains may be the key to sustaining food sources for humans in years to come As many of us begin to

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1118 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Empty Nets
    for these times and I recommend it heartily Alvin M Josephy Jr author of The Nez Perce Indians and the Opening of the Northwest Masterfully researched and lucidly told Empty Nets gives a fresh in depth account of the chicanery and environmental degradation that have confronted Indian fishermen on the Columbia River over the past half century Charles Wilkinson author of Messages from Frank s Landing an indifferent federal bureaucracy and hostile state governments In 1939 the U S Government promised to provide Columbia River Indians with replacements for traditional fishing sites flooded in the backwater of the Bonneville Dam Roberta Ulrich recounts the Indians decades long struggle in the courts and on the river to persuade the government to keep its promise From the beginning the battle was intertwined with the tribes larger effort to assert treaty guaranteed fishing rights Ulrich deftly examines a host of other issues including declining salmon runs industrial development tribal self government and recreation that became enmeshed in the tribes pursuit of justice Her broad and incisive account ranges from descriptions of the dam s disastrous effects on a salmon dependent culture to portraits of the plights of individual Indian families Descendants of those

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1067 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Engraving the Savage
    its making as a site to begin interpretation In short it is an important contribution to early modern art history and to scholarship of the West s visual production of the New World especially in terms of methodology Renaissance Quarterly Engraving the Savage is a path breaking and welcome contribution to Renaissance and early modern art history Bronwen Wilson University of British Columbia Gaudio s work offers new ways to think about some of the most influential engravings in Western Culture Indigenous Peoples Issues printmaker Theodor de Bry and were reproduced widely establishing the visual prototype of North American Indians for European and Euro American readers In this innovative analysis Michael Gaudio explains how popular engravings of Native American Indians defined the nature of Western civilization by producing an image of its savage other Going beyond the notion of the savage as an intellectual and ideological construct Gaudio examines how the tools materials and techniques of copperplate engraving shaped Western responses to indigenous peoples Engraving the Savage demonstrates that the early visual critics of the engravings attempted without complete success to open a comfortable space between their own civil image making practices and the savage practices of Native Americans such

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1036 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: The Erotics of Sovereignty
    of autonomy without threatening his sense of community In The Erotics of Sovereignty Mark Rifkin offers a telling perspective on what such a policy of self determination has meant and looks at how contemporary queer Native writers use representations of sensation to challenge official U S accounts of Native identity Rifkin focuses on four Native writers Qwo Li Driskill Cherokee Deborah Miranda Esselen Greg Sarris Graton Rachería and Chrystos Menominee

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1130 (2016-02-09)
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