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  • First Peoples: Ethnographic Contributions to the Study of Endangered Languages
    Kuna Ways of Speaking transmission in the process This language shift the gradual abandonment of minority languages in favor of national or international languages is often in response to inequalities in power signaling a pressure to conform to the political and economic structures represented by the newly dominant languages In its most extreme form language shift can result in language death and thus the permanent loss of traditional knowledge and lifeways To combat this indigenous and scholarly communities around the world have undertaken various efforts from archiving and lexicography to the creation of educational and cultural programs What works in one community however may not work in another Indeed while the causes of language endangerment may be familiar the responses to it depend on highly specific local conditions and opportunities In keeping with this premise the editors of this volume insist that to understand language endangerment researchers and communities must come to understand what is happening to the speakers not just what is happening to the language The eleven case studies assembled here strive to fill a gap in the study of endangered languages by providing much needed sociohistorical and ethnographic context and thus connecting specific language phenomena to larger

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1112 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Everything You Know about Indians Is Wrong
    of essays that were written over approximately a 15 year period It is an eclectic collection that chronicles the evolution of his views on the politics of being a Native American beginning with his obvious naivete as a committed activist within the American Indian Movement to his present employment with the federal government No target is safe from his pointed barbs not even himself The explanation of how quickly his views toward the creation of the National Museum of the American Indian changed when the practicality of needing employment entered the equation is alone worth the price of the book In addition to being an entertaining read this book gives one much to consider as Smith challenges many of the tropes that too many authors utilize when writing about native peoples Library Journal Raised in suburban Maryland and Oklahoma Smith dove head first into the political radicalism of the 1970s working with the American Indian Movement until it dissolved into dysfunction and infighting Afterward he lived in New York the city of choice for political exiles and eventually arrived in Washington D C at the newly minted National Museum of the American Indian a bad idea whose time has come as a curator In his journey from fighting activist to federal employee Smith tells us he has discovered at least two things there is no one true representation of the American Indian experience and even the best of intentions sometimes ends in catastrophe Everything You Know about Indians Is Wrong is a highly entertaining and at times searing critique of the deeply disputed role of American Indians in the United States In A Place Called Irony Smith whizzes through his early life showing us the ironic pop culture signposts that marked this Native American s coming of age in suburbia

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1080 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Federal Fathers and Mothers
    fresh insightful analysis Cathleen Cahill reveals how ideas about gender masculinity and the family influenced and defined nineteenth century policies about assimilation Federal Fathers and Mothers is a major and valuable contribution to our knowledge of the Indian Service its workforce and their influence on tribes communities and individual Native lives in the United States Brenda Child University of Minnesota author of Boarding School Seasons American Indian Families 1900 1940 American Indians but it also sought to civilize and assimilate them In Federal Fathers and Mothers Cathleen Cahill offers the first in depth social history of the agency during the height of its assimilation efforts in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries Making extensive and original use of federal personnel files and other archival materials Cahill examines how assimilation practices were developed and enacted by an unusually diverse group of women and men whites and Indians married couples and single people Cahill argues that the Indian Service pursued a strategy of intimate colonialism using employees as surrogate parents and model families in order to shift Native Americans allegiances from tribal kinship networks to Euro American familial structures and ultimately the U S government In seeking to remove Indians from

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1098 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: The First Oregonians
    It provides a comprehensive view of Oregon s native peoples This book goes even further than the previous edition toward rectifying decades of racially biased history and media commentary which tended to portray Indians either as a vanished race of savages or a helpless minority stripped of their lands cultures and identities Individually and collectively these essays enable Native Americans to take the lead in telling their own stories of survival adaptation resistance and recovery Andrew Fisher Professor of History at the College of William and Mary from the past to the present In this remarkable volume Oregon Indians tell their own stories more than half of the chapters are written by members of Oregon s nine federally recognized tribes Using oral histories and personal recollections these chapters vividly depict not only a history of decimation and decline but also a contemporary view of cultural revitalization renewal and continuity The First Oregonians also includes essays by prominent Northwest scholars exploring geography federal Indian relations language and art No other book offers as wide a variety of views and stories about the historical and contemporary experience of Oregon Indians The First Oregonians is the definitive volume for anyone interested in the

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1068 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Firsting and Lasting
    cultural politics It is a tour de force from one of our very best ethnohistorians Philip J Deloria University of Michigan O Brien s study of local histories is particularly useful because the genre has such consequences for indigenous peoples current recognition struggles throughout the world especially poignant in New England New England Quarterly This deeply researched and well written study provides an essential archival base for more theoretical studies of representation those that have already been written and those to come In the hands of O Brien local histories become rich deep and essential resources for understanding the people of the United States and the national narratives they set about creating Biography pamphlets to multivolume treatments these narratives shared a preoccupation with establishing the region as the cradle of an Anglo Saxon nation and the center of a modern American culture They also insisted often in mournful tones that New England s original inhabitants the Indians had become extinct even though many Indians still lived in the very towns being chronicled In Firsting and Lasting Jean M O Brien argues that local histories became a primary means by which European Americans asserted their own modernity while denying it to Indian peoples Erasing and then memorializing Indian peoples also served a more pragmatic colonial goal refuting Indian claims to land and rights Drawing on more than six hundred local histories from Massachusetts Connecticut and Rhode Island written between 1820 and 1880 as well as censuses monuments and accounts of historical pageants and commemorations O Brien explores how these narratives inculcated the myth of Indian extinction a myth that has stubbornly remained in the American consciousness In order to convince themselves that the Indians had vanished despite their continued presence O Brien finds that local historians and their readers embraced notions

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1032 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: From Chicaza to Chickasaw
    focus on the discovery of the new world The Midwest Book Review Robbie Ethridge s innovative imaginative work of scholarship provides the only modern comprehensive survey of all of the southeastern Indians during the protohistoric period This book is a very significant accomplishment Gregory Waselkov University of South Alabama A sweeping regional history With skillfully synthesized archaeological and documentary evidence Etheridge illuminates the Native South in its earliest colonial context and sheds new light on the profound upheaval and cultural transformation experienced by the region s first people Lone Star Book Review eighteenth century when Indigenous people no longer lived in a purely Indian world but rather on the edge of an expanding European empire and in a new social landscape that included a large population of Europeans and Africans Despite the fact that thousands of Indians died or were enslaved and virtually all Native polities were radically altered in these years the collapse of this complex Mississippian world did not extinguish the Native peoples of the South but rather transformed them Using a new interpretive framework that Ethridge calls the Mississippian shatter zone to explicate these tumultuous times From Chicaza to Chickasaw examines the European invasion and the collapse

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1089 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: From Enron to Evo
    From Enron to Evo traces the struggles of Bolivia s indigenous peoples for self determination over their lives and territories In his analysis of their response to this encroaching development author Derrick Hindery also sheds light on surprising similarities between neoliberal reform and the policies of the nation s first indigenous president Evo Morales Drawing upon extensive interviews and document analysis Hindery argues that many of the structural conditions created by neoliberal policies including partial privatization of the oil and gas sector still persist under Morales Tactics employed by both Morales and his neoliberal predecessors utilize the rhetoric of environmental protection and indigenous rights to justify oil gas mining and road development in indigenous territories and sensitive ecoregions Indigenous peoples while mindful of gains made during Morales s tenure are increasingly dissatisfied with the administration s development model particularly when it infringes upon their right to self determination From Enron to Evo demonstrates their dynamic and pragmatic strategies to cope with development and adversity while also advancing their own aims Offering a critique of both free market piracy and the dilemmas of resource nationalism this is a groundbreaking book for scholars policymakers and advocates concerned with indigenous politics social movements

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1149 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Gathering Moss
    in the process What we learn about mosses is breathtaking Orion Something I took for granted suddenly has come alive because I have been given its story After reading this book I took a magnifying glass outside and pored over tree trunks I have seen Robin Kimmerer s miniature landscape for myself Yet this is so much more than a book about mosses This is a Native American woman speaking This is a mother s story This is science revealed through the human psyche Robin Kimmerer is a scientist who combines empiricism with all other forms of knowing Hers is a spectacularly different view of the world and her true voice needs to be heard Janisse Ray author of Ecology of a Cracker Childhood and Wild Card Quilt Taking a Chance on Home element of the natural world Gathering Moss is a beautifully written mix of science and personal reflection that invites readers to explore and learn from the elegantly simple lives of mosses In this series of linked personal essays Robin Wall Kimmerer leads general readers and scientists alike to an understanding of how mosses live and how their lives are intertwined with the lives of countless other beings

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1069 (2016-02-09)
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