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  • First Peoples: Gender, Indian, Nation
    that it is a rich eminently readable study of the making of modern Ecuador Journal of Cultural Geography to this small Andean nation Even so until now the significance of gender issues to the development of modern Indian state relations has not often been addressed As she digs through Ecuador s past to find key events and developments that explain the simultaneous importance and marginalization of Indigenous women in Ecuador today Erin O Connor usefully deploys gender analysis to illuminate broader relationships between nation states and Indigenous communities O Connor begins her investigations by examining the multilayered links between gender and Indian state relations in nineteenth century Ecuador Disentangling issues of class and culture from issues of gender she uncovers overlapping conflicting and ever evolving patriarchies within both Indigenous communities and the nation s governing bodies She finds that gender influenced sociopolitical behavior in a variety of ways mediating interethnic struggles and negotiations that ultimately created the modern nation Her deep research into primary sources including congressional debates ministerial reports court cases and hacienda records allows a richer more complex and better informed national history to emerge Examining gender during Ecuadorian state building from above and below O Connor uncovers

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1012 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: History Is in the Land
    American communities which will stand for many years to come as the archetype of interdisciplinary and politically conscious work Journal of Anthropological Research their ancestral homeland This book explores the multiple cultural meanings historical interpretations and cosmological values of this extraordinary region by combining archaeological and historical sources with the ethnographic perspectives of four contemporary tribes Tohono O odham Hopi Zuni and San Carlos Apache Previous research in the San Pedro Valley has focused on scientific archaeology and documentary history with a conspicuous absence of indigenous voices yet Native Americans maintain oral traditions that provide an anthropological context for interpreting the history and archaeology of the valley The San Pedro Ethnohistory Project was designed to redress this situation by visiting archaeological sites studying museum collections and interviewing tribal members to collect traditional histories The information it gathered is arrayed in this book along with archaeological and documentary data to interpret the histories of Native American occupation of the San Pedro Valley This work provides an example of the kind of interdisciplinary and politically conscious work made possible when Native Americans and archaeologists collaborate to study the past As a methodological case study it clearly articulates how scholars can work with

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1013 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: The House on Diamond Hill
    Diamond Hill At once monument and memorial the Vann House is Cherokee African and American slavery writ large James F Brooks author of Captives and Cousins Slavery Kinship and Community in the Southwest Borderlands The fullest published portrait yet of slaves to the Cherokee The Defenders Online This is one of the most thoughtful beautifully written works of history on any topic that I have read in a long while Miles has taken a complex set of issues that have been long obscured by a desire for a romantic and guilt free past and with grace and sensitivity has completely rewritten history Leslie M Harris Emory University Nation In this first full length study to reconstruct the history of the plantation Tiya Miles tells the story of Diamond Hill s founding its flourishing its takeover by white land lottery winners on the eve of the Cherokee Removal its decay and ultimately its renovation in the 1950s This moving multiracial history sheds light on the various cultural communities that interacted within the plantation boundaries from elite Cherokee slaveholders to Cherokee subsistence farmers from black slaves of various ethnic backgrounds to free blacks from the North and South from German speaking Moravian

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1090 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: How It Is
    book has the potential to change the guiding assumptions for viewing indigenous thought in Western philosophy I consider it a seminal work that will make a lasting and essential contribution to indigenous studies Gregory Cajete University of New Mexico This collection will not only be a source of inspiration for students and scholars Native and non Native but will also be useful in mapping the intellectual conversations that Native scholars have engaged in for several generations Jennifer Denetdale University of New Mexico to defining a Native American philosophy Although she passed away before she could complete her life s work some of her colleagues have organized her pioneering contributions into this provocative book In three parts Cordova sets out a complete Native American philosophy First she explains her own understanding of the nature of reality itself the origins of the world the relation of matter and spirit the nature of time and the roles of culture and language in understanding all of these She then turns to our role as residents of the Earth arguing that we become human as we deepen our relation to our people and to our places and as we understand the responsibilities that grow from

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1022 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Huichol Territory and the Mexican Nation
    and San Luis Potosi This territory forms the heart of their economic and spiritual lives But Indigenous land struggle is a central fact of Mexican history and in this fascinating new work Paul Liffman expands our understanding of it Drawing on contemporary anthropological theory he explains how Huichols assert their sovereign rights to collectively own the 1 500 square miles they inhabit and to practice rituals across the 35 000 square miles where their access is challenged Liffman places current access claims in historical perspective tracing Huichol communities long term efforts to redress the inequitable access to land and other resources that their neighbors and the state have imposed on them Liffman writes that the cultural grounds for territorial claims were what the people I wanted to study wanted me to work on Based on six years of collaboration with a land rights organization interviews and participant observation in meetings ceremonies and extended stays on remote rancherias Huichol Territory and the Mexican Nation analyzes the sites where people define Huichol territory The book s innovative structure echoes Huichols own approach to knowledge and examines the nation and state not just the community Liffman s local regional and national perspective informs

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1102 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Imprints on Native Lands
    based on extensive fieldwork details provided by the author provide a convincing argument that the impact of Moravians on the Miskito landscape is significant Matthew Taylor University of Denver missionaries were sent with the strong encouragement of German political leaders and in the context of German attempts at colonization to spread the word of Protestantism in Central America Upon their arrival the missionaries employed a three pronged approach consisting of proselytizing medical treatment and education to convert the majority of the Indigenous population Much like the Spanish and English attempts before them German colonizing efforts in the region never completely took hold Still as Benjamin Tillman shows for the region s Indigenous inhabitants the Miskito people the arrival of the Moravian missionaries marked the beginning of an important cultural interface Imprints on Native Lands documents Moravian contributions to the Miskito settlement landscape in sixty four villages of eastern Honduras through field observations of material culture interviews with village residents and research in primary sources in the Moravian Church archives Tillman employs the resulting data to map a hierarchy of Moravian centers illustrating spatially varying degrees of Moravian influence on the Miskito settlement landscape Tillman reinforces Miskito claims to ancestral lands

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1107 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: In the Smaller Scope of Conscience
    Graves Protection and Repatriation Act NAGPRA followed These federal repatriation statutes arguably some of the most important laws in the history of anthropology museology and American Indian rights enabled Native Americans to reclaim human remains funerary objects sacred objects and objects of cultural patrimony Twenty years later the controversy instigated by the creation of NMAIA and NAGPRA continues to simmer In the Smaller Scope of Conscience is a thoughtful and detailed study of the ins and outs of the four year process behind these laws It is a singular contribution to the history of these issues with the potential to help mediate the ongoing debate by encouraging all sides to retrace the steps of the legislators responsible for the acts Few works are as detailed as McKeown s account which looks into bills that came prior to NMAIA and NAGPRA and combs the legislative history for relevant reports and correspondence Testimonies documents and interviews from the primary players of this legislative process are cited to offer insights into the drafting and political processes that shaped NMAIA and NAGPRA Above all else this landmark work distinguishes itself from earlier legislative histories with the quality of its analysis Invested and yet evenhanded

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1136 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: The Indians' New World
    and smoothly written narratives I have ever read James Axtell The Journal of Southern History The Indians New World became at the time of its publication an instant classic The story it tells of the Catawbas balancing agency with victimization triumph with trauma can serve as a microcosm of Native American history at large Deeply researched beautifully constructed written with both power and grace it has lost none of its lustre today John Demos Yale University This thoroughly researched and gracefully written book sets a new standard in American Indian history Daniel Usner Journal of American Ethnic History Working with difficult evidence and supplementing his reading of the historical record with material from anthropology folklore and archaeology Merrell has produced a well written and impressive study Colin Calloway The Journal of American History centuries later It is a story of Native agency creativity resilience and endurance Upon its original publication in 1989 James Merrell s definitive history of Catawbas and their neighbors in the southern piedmont helped signal a new direction in the study of Native Americans serving as a model for their reintegration into American history In an introduction written for this twentieth anniversary edition Merrell recalls the book

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1055 (2016-02-09)
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