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  • First Peoples: Indians, Fire, and the Land in the Pacific Northwest
    hands of its Native American inhabitants Their primary tool was fire This volume offers an interdisciplinary approach to one of the most important issues concerning Native Americans and their relationship to the land During more than 10 000 years of occupation Native Americans in the Northwest learned the intricacies of their local environments and how to use fire to create desired effects mostly in the quest for food Drawing on

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1071 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Indigeneity in the Mexican Cultural Imagination
    excluded Mexico s indigenous population from the state s self conscious efforts to shape its identity Yet until now no single book has combined the various elements of this process to provide a comprehensive look at the Indian in Mexico s cultural imagination Indigeneity in the Mexican Cultural Imagination offers a much needed examination of this fickle relationship as it is seen through literature ethnography film and art The book focuses on representations of indigenous peoples in post revolutionary literary and intellectual history by examining key cultural texts Using these analyses as a foundation Analisa Taylor links her critique to national Indian policy rights and recent social movements in Southern Mexico In addition she moves beyond her analysis of indigenous peoples in general to take a gendered look at indigenous women ranging from the villainized Malinche to the highly romanticized and sexualized Zapotec women of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec The contradictory treatment of the Indian in Mexico s cultural imagination is not unique to that country alone Rather the situation there is representative of a phenomenon seen throughout the world Though this book addresses indigeneity in Mexico specifically it has far reaching implications for the study of indigenaety across Latin

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1003 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Indigenous Agency in the Amazon
    indigenous people in the Bolivian Amazon the Mojos has coexisted with non Natives since the late 1600s when they accepted Jesuit missionaries into their homeland converted to Catholicism and adapted their traditional lifestyle to the conventions of mission life Nearly two hundred years later they faced two new challenges liberalism and the rubber boom White authorities promoted liberalism as a way of modernizing the region and ordered the dismantling of much of the social structure of the missions The rubber boom created a demand for labor which took the Mojos away from their savanna towns and into the northern rain forests Gary Van Valen postulates that as ex mission Indians who lived on a frontier the Mojos had an expanded capacity to adapt that helped them meet these challenges Their frontier life provided them with the space and mind set to move their agricultural plots and cattle herds join independent indigenous groups or move to Brazil Their mission history gave them the experience they needed to participate in the rubber export economy and the politics of white society Van Valen argues that the indigenous Mojos also learned how to manipulate liberal discourse to their advantage He demonstrates that the Mojos

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1153 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Indigenous Miracles
    in the anticipated triumph of the faith As the conversion of the Indigenous people of Mexico proceeded in earnest Catholic ritual became the medium through which Indigenous leaders and Spaniards negotiated colonial hegemony Indigenous Miracles is about how the Nahua elite of central Mexico secured political legitimacy through the administration of public rituals centered on miraculous images of Christ the King Osowski argues that these images were adopted as community symbols and furthermore allowed Nahua leaders to represent their own kingship protecting their claims to legitimacy This legitimacy allowed them to act collectively to prevent the loss of many aspects of their culture Osowski demonstrates how a shared religion admitted the possibility of Indigenous agency and new ethnic identities Consulting both Nahuatl and Spanish sources Osowski strives to fill a gap in the history of the Nahuas from 1760 to 1810 a momentous time when previously sanctioned religious practices were condemned by the viceroys and archbishops of the Bourbon royal dynasty His approach synthesizes ethnohistory and institutional history to create a fascinating account of how and why the Nahuas protected the practices and symbols they had appropriated under Hapsburg rule Ultimately Osowski s account contributes to our understanding of the

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1084 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Indigenous Writings from the Convent
    gender race and conventual writing Sara E Owens Colonial Latin American Historical Review Juan de Altamirano to ask for his help in getting church prelates to exclude Creole and Spanish women from convents intended for indigenous nuns only Drawing on this and other such letters as well as biographies sermons and other texts Monica Diaz argues that the survival of indigenous ethnic identity was effectively served by this class of noble indigenous nuns While colonial sources that refer to indigenous women are not scant documents in which women emerge as agents who actively participate in shaping their own identity are rare Looking at this minority agency or subaltern voice in various religious discourses exposes some central themes It shows that an indigenous identity recast in Catholic terms was able to be effectively recorded and that the religious participation of these women at a time when indigenous parishes were increasingly secularized lent cohesion to that identity Indigenous Writings from the Convent examines ways in which indigenous women participated in one of the most prominent institutions in colonial times the Catholic Church and what they made of their experience with convent life This book will appeal to scholars of literary criticism women

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1087 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Inheriting the Past
    scholarship This book speaks volumes about the unknown history of emerging American archaeology and its relation to those it studies This is an extraordinary book David Hurst Thomas author of Exploring Native North America Cattaraugus Reservation Arthur C Parker joined the ranks of professional archaeology Until now Parker s life and legacy as the first Native American archaeologist have been neither closely studied nor widely recognized At a time when heated debates about the control of Native American heritage have come to dominate archaeology Parker s experiences form a singular lens to view the field s tangled history and current predicaments with Indigenous peoples In Inheriting the Past Chip Colwell Chanthaphonh examines Parker s winding career path and asks why it has taken generations for Native peoples to follow in his footsteps Closely tracing Parker s life through extensive archival research Colwell Chanthaphonh explores how Parker crafted a professional identity and negotiated dilemmas arising from questions of privilege ownership authorship and public participation How Parker as well as the discipline more broadly chose to address the conflict between Native American rights and the pursuit of scientific discovery ultimately helped form archaeology s moral community Parker s rise in archaeology just

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1004 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: The Invasion of America
    cultural contact in New England and elsewhere can now proceed in an atmosphere freed from the cant of conquest The New England Quarterly The historiography of Indian European relations will never be the same The American Historical Review transplantation of European culture to a new continent a virgin land in which Native Americans were assigned the role of foil whose main contribution was to stimulate the energy and ingenuity of

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1058 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Klamath Heartlands
    United States Senator Oregon retired This plan for integrating the human community and the Klamath forests is founded on several kinds of justice Within the provisions for just relations lie the plan s several kinds of wisdom Barry Lopez Oregon governor Tom McCall called the greatest single stand of ponderosa pines to be found anywhere in the West Part of the Tribes effort to regain lands they lost in 1954

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1072 (2016-02-09)
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