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  • First Peoples: The Land Has Memory
    world The book captures the power and spirit of place in Native American cultures past and present Clifford E Trafzer Rupert Costo Chair University of California Riverside and coeditor of Native Universe Voices of Indian America This book paints spectacular word pictures of a setting as old as the land which lovingly embraces the everlasting life giving spirits within and without It contains powerful stories of historic proportions of honor of revered gifts and of the triumphant human spirit epitomized in the National Museum of the American Indian Henrietta Mann president Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribal College might have known it Unlike most landscapes that surround other museums on the National Mall the natural environment around the Smithsonian s National Museum of the American Indian NMAI is itself a living exhibit carefully created to reflect indigenous ways of thinking about the land and its uses Abundantly illustrated The Land Has Memory offers beautiful images of the museum s natural environment in every season as well as the uniquely designed building itself Essays by Smithsonian staff and others involved in the museum s creation provide an examination of indigenous peoples long and varied relationship to the land in the Americas an account

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1049 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Landscape of Fraud
    research a restrained even occasionally empathetic accounting of events Arizona Daily Star of their way of life History has recorded more than three centuries of speculative failures that never amounted to much but left dispossessed people in their wake This book seeks to excavate those failures to examine the new social spaces the schemers struggled to create and the existing social spaces they destroyed Landscapes of Fraud explores how the penetration of the evolving capitalist world system created and destroyed communities in the Upper Santa Cruz Valley of Arizona from the late 1600s to the 1970s Thomas Sheridan has melded history anthropology and critical geography to create a penetrating view of greed and power and their lasting effect on those left powerless Sheridan first examines how O odham culture was fragmented by the arrival of the Spanish telling how autonomous communities moving across landscapes in seasonal rounds were reduced to a mission world of subordination Sheridan then considers the fate of the Tumacacori grant and Baca Float No 3 another land grant He tells the unbroken story of land fraud from Manuel Maria Gandara s purchase of the abandoned Tumacacori grant at public auction in 1844 through the bankruptcy of

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1024 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Legalizing Identities
    the quilombo This powerful and historically rich ethnography speaks to issues of race ethnicity identity inequality and law and does so in a way that is both analytically compelling and engaging to read Susan Bibler Coutin University of California Irvine Legalizing Identities is an extremely well written empirically rich and sophisticated analysis of ethnogenesis in Northeastern Brazil It will be an appealing book for courses taught on race ethnicity Indianness Blackness law and society and Latin American studies Jonathan W Warren University of Washington developed Legalizing Identities shows how law can successfully serve as the impetus for the transformation of cultural practices and collective identity Through ethnographic historical and legal analysis of successful claims to land by two neighboring black communities in the backlands of northeastern Brazil Jan Hoffman French demonstrates how these two communities have come to distinguish themselves from each other while revising and retelling their histories and present day stories French argues that the invocation of laws by these related communities led to the emergence of two different identities one indigenous Xoco Indian and the other quilombo descendants of a fugitive African slave community With the help of the Catholic Church government officials lawyers anthropologists and activists

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1057 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Lessons from a Quechua Strongwoman
    Napo Runa of Amazonian Ecuador Using the intriguing stories and words of a Quechua speaking woman named Luisa Cadena from the Pastaza Province of Ecuador Janis B Nuckolls reveals a complex language system in which ideophony dialogue and perspective are all at the core of cultural and grammatical communications among Amazonian Quechua speakers This book is a fascinating look at ideophones words that communicate succinctly through imitative sound qualities They are at the core of Quechua speakers discourse both linguistic and cultural because they allow agency and reaction to substances and entities as well as beings Nuckolls shows that Luisa Cadena s utterances give every individual major or minor a voice in her narrative Sometimes as subtle as a barely felt movement or unintelligible sound the language supports an amazingly wide variety of voices Cadena s narratives and commentaries on everyday events reveal that sound imitation through ideophones representations of dialogues between humans and nonhumans and grammatical distinctions between a speaking self and an other are all part of a language system that allows for the possibility of shared affects intentions moral values and meaningful communicative interactions between humans and nonhumans About Janis B Nuckolls Janis B Nuckolls is an

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1088 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: The Life-Giving Stone
    simply as common everyday tools and therefore unremarkable Searcy s methodology reveals how for the ancient Maya the manufacture and use of grinding stones significantly impacted their physical and economic welfare In tracing the life cycle of these tools from production to discard for the modern Maya Searcy discovers rich customs and traditions that indicate how metates and manos have continued to sustain life not just literally in terms of food but also in terms of culture His research is based on two years of fieldwork among three Mayan groups in which he documented behaviors associated with these tools during their procurement production acquisition use discard and re use Searcy s investigation documents traditional practices that are rapidly being lost or dramatically modified In few instances will it be possible in the future to observe metates and manos as central elements in household provisioning or follow their path from hand manufacture to market distribution and to intergenerational transmission In this careful inquiry into the cultural significance of a simple tool Searcy s ethnographic observations are guided both by an interest in how grinding stone traditions have persisted and how they are changing today and by the goal of enhancing the

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1103 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Like a Loaded Weapon
    even one that involves taking to the streets but an immediate and transformative political event nonetheless The Supreme Court must lead the way by overtly turning over two centuries of discriminatory legal rhetoric that perpetuates discrimination in fact Cultural Survival Quarterly Williams book is of a rare breed for academic writing thoroughly researched meticulously sourced intelligently argued and passionate to the point of anger Law and Politics Book Review Williams s analysis of the language of Indian law makes this book a valuable addition to both history and law classes He offers specific proposals for Indian law advocates It should be required reading for Supreme Court justices Western Historical Quarterly savagery and cultural inferiority this language Williams contends has functioned like a loaded weapon in the Supreme Court s Indian law decisions Beginning with Chief Justice John Marshall s foundational opinions in the early nineteenth century and continuing today in the judgments of the Rehnquist Court Williams shows how undeniably racist language and precedent are still used in Indian law to justify the denial of important rights of property self government and cultural survival to Indians Building on the insights of Malcolm X Thurgood Marshall and Frantz Fanon Williams argues

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1045 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Lumbee Indians in the Jim Crow South
    in post Civil War North Carolina it figures identity as a complex and not always polite conversation between insiders and outsiders that changes over time Her argument is solidly grounded in archival research and also interweaves personal and family stories that enhance the narrative in beautiful ways Her insights on race identity and recognition are subtle nuanced and powerful Jean O Brien University of Minnesota This is the first book to construct a full layered sense of who the Lumbees are and how they became who they are as a Native American community Lowery demonstrates that the core characteristics of kinship reciprocity and relationship to land have persisted in Lumbee identity even as Lumbees in dialogue with outsiders enfolded new elements into their collective sense of self Lowery s cogent explanation of the choices Lumbees made to accept the racial logic of Jim Crow in order to strive for community independence is nuanced sensitive and convincing Her book will be a major contribution to American Indian southern and African American historical studies Tiya Miles University of Michigan An important new book Extraordinarily detailed Superbly written A masterful discussion that will be the standard treatment for decades to come North Carolina Historical Review describes how between Reconstruction and the 1950s the Lumbee crafted and maintained a distinct identity in an era defined by racial segregation in the South and paternalistic policies for Indians throughout the nation They did so against the backdrop of some of the central issues in American history including race class politics and citizenship Lowery argues that Indian is a dynamic identity that for outsiders sometimes hinged on the presence of Indian blood for federal New Deal policy makers and sometimes on the absence of black blood for southern white segregationists Lumbee people themselves have constructed their identity

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1047 (2016-02-09)
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  • First Peoples: Mark My Words
    mobile reservation lands become overcrowded and the state seeks to enforce means of containment closing its borders to incoming often indigenous immigrants In Mark My Words Mishuana Goeman traces settler colonialism as an enduring form of gendered spatial violence demonstrating how it persists in the contemporary context of neoliberal globalization The book argues that it is vital to refocus the efforts of Native nations beyond replicating settler models of territory jurisdiction and race Through an examination of twentieth century Native women s poetry and prose Goeman illuminates how these works can serve to remap settler geographies and center Native knowledges She positions Native women as pivotal to how our nations both tribal and nontribal have been imagined and mapped and how these women play an ongoing role in decolonization In a strong and lucid voice Goeman provides close readings of literary texts including those of E Pauline Johnson Esther Belin Joy Harjo Leslie Marmon Silko and Heid Erdrich In addition she places these works in the framework of U S and Canadian Indian law and policy Her charting of women s struggles to define themselves and their communities reveals the significant power in all of our stories About Mishuana Goeman

    Original URL path: http://firstpeoplesnewdirections.org/book.php?id=1147 (2016-02-09)
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