archive-org.com » ORG » F » FNPP.ORG

Total: 43

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • First Nations Partnership Programs in Child and Youth Care
    Aboriginal Indigenous Indian Native Early Childhood Education Children Youth Infant development Childhood Child Development Child and Youth Care Human Services Child Care ECE ECCE ECCD ECD CYC University of Victoria UVic Tribal Council Band Tribal Associations Tribal Organizations Meadow Lake Participatory Participation Emancipatory Emancipation Collaboration Community Development International Multicultural Bicultural Post Secondary Tertiary Education Professional Training Capacity Building Adult University Healing Culture Parenting effectiveness Parenting skills rearing Socialization Aboriginal Head

    Original URL path: http://www.fnpp.org/ (2016-02-09)
    Open archived version from archive

  • First Nations Partnership Programs in Child and Youth Care
    alternative to the imposition of best practices on communities by outside specialists It tells the story of an unexpected partnership initiated by an Aboriginal tribal council with the University of Victoria s School of Child and Youth Care The partnership has produced a new approach to professional education in which community leaders are co constructors of the curriculum and implementation proceeded only if both parties are present and engaged Word of this generative curriculum has spread to numerous Aboriginal communities and now over sixty communities have participated in the First Nations Partnerships Program Jessica Ball and Alan Pence show how this innovative program has strengthened community capacity to design deliver and evaluate culturally appropriate programs to support young children s development The authors Jessica Ball and Alan Pence are professors in the School of Child and Youth Care at the University of Victoria For more information on how to order please go to the UBC Press website by clicking here This site describes The philosophy principles and methodology of the Generative Curriculum Model Outcomes of the 1998 2000 program evaluation Program structure and courses Program costs Program publications How to contact FNPP Highlights of program evaluation 78 of students completed

    Original URL path: http://www.fnpp.org/home.htm (2016-02-09)
    Open archived version from archive

  • First Nations Partnership Programs: Overview
    from mainstream theory research and practice What emerged through this first pilot program was a model for generating curriculum that is bicultural construes children within the broad ecology of the community relies on local knowledge perspectives and experiences contributed by elders and other community resource people and furthers community development through the program being is delivered entirely in and by the community with support as needed from a university based team Refer to Community based delivery and Community development First Nations partners First Nations communities on reserves that have partnered with the University of Victoria to deliver the training program include Meadow Lake Tribal Council Saskatchewan Cowichan Tribes British Columbia Mount Currie First Nation British Columbia Nzen man Child and Family Services British Columbia Onion Lake First Nation Saskatchewan Tl azt en Nation British Columbia Treaty 8 Tribal Association British Columbia Little Shuswap Indian Band and associated communities British Columbia Children at Grand Opening of Pqusnalcw Eagle s Nest Centre Housing Xit olacw Child Care Centre Mount Currie First Nation British Columbia The university based partners housed in the School of Child and Youth Care at the University of Victoria are interested in extending the reach of this effective community based program through partnerships with other First Nations communities Non First Nations communities are also welcome to explore partnerships with the university based team Due to the flexibility of the model for program delivery and the openness of the curriculum to input from knowledgeable community members the program is likely to benefit a wide range of cultural communities and contribute to new learning among the university based partners Refer to Partnership Research evaluation Refer to Program evaluation A comprehensive program of research conducted from 1998 to 2000 has yielded clear evidence of the far reaching benefits of this innovative community drive participatory approach Student retention and successful program completion across the seven partnership programs is twice the national average for First Nations post secondary training More importantly over 95 of program graduates remain in their own communities rather than the common pattern of going away for training and not returning To date with three programs just completed in 1999 65 of program graduates have created new programs for children and youth 13 have assumed staff positions in existing programs in their communities and 11 are continuing with educational studies Children s programs mounted by program graduates include out of home daycares family daycares Aboriginal Head Start infant development programs youth services school readiness programs language enhancement programs and home school liaison programs Refer to Community development In developing new programs program graduates have the benefit of training that has embodied the culture of the community and that has taken account of the living conditions needs and goals of children and families in their community Because this participatory training model involves the community in all phases of program planning delivery and evaluation program graduates report few of the difficulties commonly encountered when soliciting parents involvement elder participation and other community support

    Original URL path: http://www.fnpp.org/fnppov.htm (2016-02-09)
    Open archived version from archive

  • First Nations Partnership Programs in Child and Youth Care
    Childhood Educator 19 5 24 28 Ball J 2004 Incorporating culture in early childhood programs Early Childhood Educator 19 1 Ball J 2004 First Nations Partnership Programs Incorporating culture in ECE training 46 KB The Early Childhood Educator 19 1 1 5 Ball J 2004 Intergenerational teaching and learning in First Nations early childhood care and development training partnerships 87 KB Early Childhood Educator 19 3 8 12 Ball J Simpkins M 2004 The community within the child Integration of Indigenous knowledge into First Nations childcare process and practice 265 KB American Indian Quarterly 28 3 4 480 498 2003 Ball J 2003 A generative curriculum model of child and youth care training through First Nations University partnerships 306 KB Native Social Work Journal 4 1 84 103 Ball J 2003 Incorporating indigenous knowledge in post secondary teaching 3 4 MB In M Cherian R Y Mau Eds Teaching large classes Usable practices from around the world pp 84 101 Singapore McGraw Hill Education 2002 Ball J 2002 A generative curriculum model of child and youth care training through First Nations university Partnerships 1 2 MB Workshop presented at the 12th National Child Youth Conference St John s NL October 24 Ball J Pence A 2002 The generative curriculum model A bicultural community based approach to building capacity for early childhood care and development in indigenous communities in Canada In K Boven J Morohashi Eds Best practices using indigenous knowledge pp 198 218 The Hague The Netherlands Nuffic Paris France UNESCO MOST Ball J Pence A Benner A 2002 Quality child care and community development What is the connection 1 6 MB In M V Hayes L T Foster Eds Too small to see too big to ignore Child health and well being in British Columbia pp 75 102 Victoria BC Western Geographical Press Ball J Pence A Pierre M Kuehne V 2002 Intergenerational teaching and learning in Canadian First Nations Partnership Programs 1 3 MB In M Kaplan N Henkin A Kusano Eds Linking lifetimes A global view of intergenerational exchange pp 83 100 New York NY United Press of America Inc 2001 Ball J Leo C Pierre M 2001 From the inside out A profile of Mount Currie First Nation aboriginal child and youth care program 374 KB Interaction 15 1 25 27 Ball J Pence A 2001 Constructing knowledge and training curricula about early childhood care and development in Canadian aboriginal communities 2 5 MB Toronto ON Caledon Institute of Social Policy Ball J Pence A 2001 A generative curriculum model for supporting child care and cevelopment programs in First Nations communities 1 3 MB Journal of Speech Language Pathology and Audiology 25 2 114 124 Ball J Pence A 2001 Program evaluation report Strengthening community capacity for early childhood care and development 75 6 MB Victoria BC First Nations Partnership Programs University of Victoria Ball J Pence A 2001 Training in First Nations communities Five secrets of success 519 KB Interaction 15 1 19 24 Pence

    Original URL path: http://www.fnpp.org/pub.htm (2016-02-09)
    Open archived version from archive

  • First Nations Partnership Programs in Child and Youth Care
    the importance of broader community development impacts achieved through the program Jette 1993 The FNPP entered into partnership arrangements with a total of ten Tribal Organizations over an 18 year period 1989 2007 Dr Pence was joined by Dr Jessica Ball in 1994 and when Dr Pence became engaged with tertiary education in Africa in 1999 2000 see www ecdvu org Dr Ball continued as FNPP Director through 2007 apence

    Original URL path: http://www.fnpp.org/contact.htm (2016-02-09)
    Open archived version from archive

  • First Nations Partnership Programs in Child and Youth Care
    is all ways respectful of the culturally based knowledge that resides in First Nations communities and in established Euro western sources Generative Curriculum Model Guiding Principles Support community initiative in a community based setting Promote respect all ways multicultural inputs Draw upon community and individual strengths Ensure a broad ecological perspective awareness of the child in the context of family and community Provide education and career laddering for students such that credit for this coursework will be fully applicable to future study and practice Engage in co construction of a bicultural curriculum in which Elders and other community resource people figure prominently Provide the basis for broader child youth family and community serving training and services while the immediate focus is on early childhood care and development No texts existed that could provide community specific information and few texts or materials provided culturally specific information So the initial design of the Generative Curriculum Model was not seen as radical but necessary and sensible Course content in the first two partnerships adopted a spiral structure with the idea that material generated through student instructor interaction and through the contributions of Elders would be incorporated into successive course offerings Through feedback presented

    Original URL path: http://www.fnpp.org/gcm.htm (2016-02-09)
    Open archived version from archive

  • First Nations Partnership Programs in Child and Youth Care
    all seven partnerships Findings are based on interpretation of 290 transcribed interviews and supporting documents Cross sectional data analyses were used for comparisons across partnerships and across a sample of mainstream college programs in which some First Nations students were enrolled These comparisons helped us to identify factors that contributed to different kinds of challenges and successes in program delivery and outcomes Evaluation findings highlighted here are based on the voices of program participants as well as the experiences of the university based team who worked alongside them A brief overview of findings is provided here More detailed reports have been published elsewhere See resources published after 1998 The program evaluation conducted from 1998 2000 built upon formative evaluations which assessed the first two partnerships These evaluations shed light on the impacts of the training program on social cohesion particularly on the re instatement of Elders to positions of influence and respect in community life To receive copies of these formative evaluations see Program Contacts References D I Jette 1993 Meadow Lake Tribal Council Indian Child Care Program Evaluation Unpublished Manuscript Meadow Lake Tribal Council Saskatchewan P Cook 1993 Curriculum Evaluation for the MLTC SCYC Career Ladder Project Unpublished manuscript School of Child and Youth Care University of Victoria R Regan A Kimble 1994 The Cowichan Tribes Early Childhood Education Child and Youth Care Career Ladder Project Unpublished report to the Centre for Curriculum and Professional Development Victoria A Pence M McCallum 1994 Towards an inclusionary approach in defining quality In P Moss A Pence eds Valuing Quality in Early Childhood Services New Approaches to Defining Quality London Paul Chapman The summative program evaluation conducted between 1998 2000 confirmed that the generative potential of the partnership process lay in part in the steps taken to involve as many community members

    Original URL path: http://www.fnpp.org/peval.htm (2016-02-09)
    Open archived version from archive

  • First Nations Partnership Programs in Child and Youth Care
    and culture to generate knowledge about supporting adolescents Related link CYCB 221 Adolescence Summer Science Program UBC First Nations Longhouse http www health sciences ubc ca iah summerscience html Up to chart CYCB 230 The Ecology of Health Safety and Nutrition for Children Methods of meeting children s needs for health safety and nutrition vary according to culture and environment so this course will explore the needs of children in the communities where learners plan to work Traditional ways of ensuring health and safety will be considered alongside strategies for educating and working with parents families and community members Students will identify a community health issue identify health indicators and explore community based solutions Up to chart CYCB 231 Administration of Child Care Facilities The essentials of administering a child care facility on and off reserve will be explored including staffing management program development budget management implementing statuatory regulations and meeting regional health standards Students will be required to plan and design a new childcare facility including identifying and meeting all appropriate regulations and standards for quality Students will formulate an illustrative set of policies to establish practice principles appropriate to the context of their community Up to chart STRAND COMMUNICATIONS CYCB 123 The Caring and Learning Environment ECCE This course taken either concurrently or after Curriculum Design and Implementation CYCB 122 studies the total environment of a child care facility and the integration of these environmental elements Students investigate theories of building environments that nurture and educate design and plan such environments and examine ways of administering and managing these environments The course acknowledges and builds on the knowledge of learning environments and content areas that students have previously studied and it includes activities intended to elicit from them the perspectives of their own experience Throughout the course Elders and students generate insights into learning environments from the perspective of First Nations cultures Pre or corequisites CYCB 122 Up to chart CYCB 150 Interpersonal Communications This course introduces students to the characteristics and dynamics of interpersonal communications It provides an opportunity for students to consider their own communication practices and gain personal awareness They also improve their skills in the areas of self concept personal learning styles perception verbal and nonverbal communication active listening understanding of relationships and the expression of feelings Throughout the course Elders and students give insights into interpersonal communications from the perspective of their own culture Students also produce a portfolio that represents their reflection on and integration of the course material Up to chart CYCB 151 Communicating with Children and Guiding Children s Behaviour This course introduces students to methods of communicating with children that help foster positive child development It provides an introduction to three theoretical approaches to guiding children Students identify and practice effective methods of communicating with children within the context of various theoretical approaches Throughout the course the perspectives of the First Nation s community regarding communicating with children and guiding children s behaviour are elicited from Elders and students

    Original URL path: http://www.fnpp.org/courses.htm (2016-02-09)
    Open archived version from archive



  •