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  • First Nations Partnership Programs in Child and Youth Care
    ideal situation would be that all course instructors are also members of the partnering First Nations cultural community but that is not always possible In four of the seven partnerships to date there was at least one aboriginal course instructor two programs were able to hire instructors from within their communities and Mount Currie First Nation had the exceptional capacity to recruit instructors from their own community exclusively Instructors from outside the partnering First Nations need to orient themselves both to the program and to the community upon arrival Students A special admissions procedure using flexible prior learning criteria was arranged at the university to enable students to be registered as a cohort ranging from 10 to 22 students for each training program Across the eight partnerships students have been between 21 and 50 years of age All of the First Nations communities conducted their own recruiting screening and preparatory programs for students based on locally established criteria Common student selection criteria included academic readiness likelihood of success personal wellness known to have supportive relationships with children through work and or family strong interest in Early Childhood Care and Development as a career Program costs and benefits Average costs per student ranged from 4 000 to 5 000 per term Costs varied considerably across program due to geography availability of community resource people and the extent to which students had to commute to classes or to practicum sites In one program in northern British Columbia where students relocated from six remote villages to a central community the living allowance component was substantially higher approximating the support costs for students who move away from home to attend universities and colleges in western Canada In each partnership at least 80 of the costs of the program remained within the community The communities

    Original URL path: http://www.fnpp.org/cbcycdp.htm (2016-02-09)
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  • First Nations Partnership Programs in Child and Youth Care
    and their communities and for the university based partners The First Nations Partnership Programs are coordinated by Dr Jessica Ball at the University of Victoria see Program Contacts Children are precious gifts They are the future strength of our communities We see them as a responsibility of the whole community not just of parents So when we delivered this program to develop our child care capacities it made sense that it was an open classroom where many people from the community were allowed entry into the education process and asked to contribute The whole community enjoyed it and the whole community benefited Marie McCallum Administrator Meadow Lake Tribal Council First Nations Partnership Programs Meadow Lake Tribal Council Meadow Lake Saskatchewan Saskatchewan Indian Institute of Technology and University of Victoria 1989 1993 Cowichan Tribes Duncan British Columbia Malaspina University College and University of Victoria 1993 1995 Nzen man Child and Family Services Lytton British Columbia Nicola Valley Institute of Technology and University of Victoria 1995 1997 Onion Lake First Nation Onion Lake Saskatchewan Saskatchewan Indian Institute of Technology and University of Victoria 1996 1998 Tl azt en Nation Tache British Columbia and University of Victoria 1996 1999 Treaty 8 Tribal Association Fort St John British Columbia and University of Victoria 1997 1999 Mount Currie First Nation Mount Currie British Columbia and University of Victoria 1997 1999 Little Shuswap Indian Band and associated First Nations Chase British Columbia and University of Victoria 2000 2002 The goals of the Meadow Lake Tribal Council and the concerns they voiced about the limitations of available standardized training models mirrored themes in the literature on the experience of First Nations students at mainstream universities These themes are also emerging as salient in indigenous communities on other continents where development assistance efforts often impose models that represent

    Original URL path: http://www.fnpp.org/fnpp.htm (2016-02-09)
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  • First Nations Partnership Programs in Child and Youth Care
    supported First Nations self determination in their communities and the quest for capacity building at the community level to provide quality child care and development programs that embody First Nations cultural traditions values and practices We realized that if we wanted to develop economically we first had to develop our human resources because development must come from the inside not the outside Vern Bachiu Programs and Policy Director Meadow Lake Tribal Council Vern Bachiu and Alan Pence The First Nations Partnership Programs demonstrate that First Nations people have the will and the social cohesion to take the driver s seat on the journey towards increased child and family service capacity Despite considerable differences among our partners in terms of their infrastructure location economic status and existing services for children and families all of the partnership initiatives engendered unprecedented success for students and for the community as a whole The program evaluation showed what can happen when training in Early Childhood Education and Youth Care is envisioned and implemented as a community development tool Most importantly the research process has clarified what guides the process how the pieces fit together to realize community identified goals and strategies building upon and expanding

    Original URL path: http://www.fnpp.org/fnsd.htm (2016-02-09)
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  • First Nations Partnership Programs in Child and Youth Care
    and families in their own community The Medicine Wheel teaches us about balance When you do mainstream education in isolation from the community and without much personal connection to your own experiences and who you are then you are only developing within the thinking intellectual quadrant of the Medicine Wheel This is out of balance The wheel of development does not turn smoothly When you involve your whole self especially your spirituality in learning growth and development and strengthen your connection with your community especially the Elders and their spirituality then you develop in all quadrants of the Medicine Wheel Then you have balance This program in child and youth care using the Generative Curriculum Model will enable us to get the wheel turning again in our community First Nations Intergenerational Facilitator Community based administrators who contributed to program evaluation emphasized that for genuine partnership between the university and the students communities to exist First Nations people themselves must have a place at the table to speak about their traditions values and practices on children s care and development Both the knowledge held in the university and the knowledge held in the community informed course design and delivery in each partnership program bringing multiple perspectives into the field of Early Childhood Education and Youth Care Our model for co constructed bicultural curriculum captures the bridging dimensions of social cohesion and social inclusion in many different ways In practice the socio cultural distance between a mainstream university and First Nations communities was greatly reduced the university moved over taking the passenger seat and our First Nations partner took the driver s seat The model below shows the many elements and perspectives that are brought into the teaching and learning process contributing to the co construction of curriculum A recurrent theme emerging

    Original URL path: http://www.fnpp.org/ppps.htm (2016-02-09)
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  • First Nations Partnership Programs in Child and Youth Care
    together to enable a cultural fit both in the content of the training program and the outcomes related to the goals of the community Community vision and commitment to strengthening capacity for serving children and families through a partnership program delivery Institutional vision and commitment to collaborating with community members in the pursuit of community identified goals Community based delivery Involvement of a cohort or group of students moving through

    Original URL path: http://www.fnpp.org/capb.htm (2016-02-09)
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  • First Nations Partnership Programs in Child and Youth Care
    construct bicultural ECE curriculum Provide ongoing supports for students Design and conduct program evaluation Participate in documentation evaluation Prepare and disseminate information on partnership programs Jessica Ball and partner Christine Leo Economic Development Officer for Mount Currie Alan Pence and elders The program evaluation research underscored the need for systemic changes in the ways educational institutions and policy makers conceptualize enable community inclusion in capacity building initiatives utilize and support social cohesion and social inclusion in communities promote relations of reciprocity between indigenous and non indigenous groups and respond to what First Nations people know is needed to promote the well being of their children and families Reciprocally Guided Partnerships The most salient characteristics of the partnerships between communities and university representatives has been that the partners mobilize around a specific agreed upon goal strengthening community capacity to meet the needs of children and families and the assumption that no partner has a more legitimate claim to truths or the best practices for achieving this goal In the program evaluation community members expressed their appreciation that the university based partners did not behave as ultimate authorities on what should be taught or present themselves as experts on child care and development Rather the university based partners moved out of the driver s seat so that the community partners could determine the desired goals and themes for the training through a participatory process Their overwhelming emphasis centered on themes of trust reciprocity mutual learning and sharing knowledge Community based administrators who contributed to program evaluation emphasized that for genuine partnership between the university and the students communities to exist First Nations people themselves must have a place at the table to speak about their traditions values and practices on children s care and development In earlier formative evaluations the stance of

    Original URL path: http://www.fnpp.org/partner.htm (2016-02-09)
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  • First Nations Partnership Programs in Child and Youth Care
    their ideas and get feedback Amelia Stark Administrator Tl azt en Nation Community participants in the evaluation project helped us to see that for many members of rural communities distance education is really the opposite of how it is conventionally defined For them distance education occurs when community members have to leave their communities travelling distances in order to access education and training Using the Generative Curriculum Model education is both spatially and socially closer to home keeping students in close proximity to sources of knowledge and support in their own ecologies Community based education What s in a name In order to ensure that our culture will be reflected in the structure of children s services we had to bring the training program to the community and bring the community into the training program It was like a big circle Louise Underwood Intergenerational Facilitator Cowichan Tribes The implications of basing a program in the community and involving the community throughout the delivery emerged in the evaluation project as one of the most distinctive features of the Generative Curriculum Model distinguishing it from good constructivist participatory pedagogy Instructors at mainstream campuses who were asked to comment on the model and compare it to their own teaching experiences pointed to the difficulty of doing generative curriculum in programs where students are at a distance from their home communities The absence of community in traditional university education and the exclusion of community even in some programs that are physically located in the community create major challenges for making professional training relevant students are not practicing with and receiving input and feedback from the people who they are training to serve This comparative view of varying educational terrains came sharply into focus through the evaluation project In their accounts many participants in the

    Original URL path: http://www.fnpp.org/cbd.htm (2016-02-09)
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  • First Nations Partnership Programs in Child and Youth Care
    around in this process Louise Underwood Intergenerational Facilitator Cowichan Tribes Elder Involvement In First Nations communities Elders are the main source of knowledge of traditional ways of supporting children and families Their participation was essential to the bicultural curriculum development process In all seven First Nations Partnership Programs Elders contributed significant portions of the content of each course At the same time they modeled ways of story telling listening and

    Original URL path: http://www.fnpp.org/interg.htm (2016-02-09)
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